News

$2 Million Gift from the Blavatnik Family Foundation to Support Scientists in Training at Penn Biomedical Graduate Studies Program

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The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has received a $2 million gift from the Blavatnik Family Foundation to establish the Blavatnik Family Fellowship in Biomedical Research in the Penn Biomedical Graduate Studies (BGS) program. Headed by industrialist and philanthropist Len Blavatnik, the Blavatnik Family Foundation has a strong history of supporting talented young scientists at premier institutions around the globe.

The Blavatnik Family Fellowship will be competitively awarded to six Penn BGS students for each of the next four academic years. By 2021, the Blavatnik Family Fellowship will have impacted 24 students, all Blavatnik Family Fellows, by providing a crucial boost at the very moment these talented trainees are launching as independent investigators. The Fellowship ensures support for students during their work with their mentors, a pivotal relationship in their scientific journey.

“We are delighted to be able to partner with the Blavatnik Family Foundation in accelerating critical research by cultivating outstanding young minds at the beginning of their careers,” said Penn President Amy Gutmann. “We are deeply grateful to Len Blavatnik and the Blavatnik Family Foundation for this visionary gift to Penn Biomedical Graduate Studies—one of the strongest training programs in the nation—and their support for the next generation of scientific thought leaders.”

The inaugural class of Blavatnik Family Fellows was chosen in July 2018 from many nominees from the BGS program. The students selected are Divyansh Agarwal, Edward Chuang, Jinyang Li, Kamen Simeonov, Huchuan “Cedric” Xia and Linda Zhou. They are focusing on research projects with translational implications across many disease areas, including: ocular diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, pancreatic cancer, cancer metastasis, psychiatric disorders; and trinucleotide repeat expansion disorders, such as Huntington’s disease and Fragile X Syndrome.

J. Larry Jameson, EVP of the University of Pennsylvania for the Health System and Dean of the Perelman School of Medicine, explained the power and influence these students bring to their research labs: “Many of our students are playing key roles in advancing major breakthroughs here at Penn thanks to BGS’s thoughtful, expert mentors, a world-class research infrastructure, and a culture of collaboration. With the generous support of the Blavatnik Family Foundation, our talented Blavatnik Family Fellows will be able to transform their scientific passions into discoveries that improve human health.”

Len Blavatnik, a prominent entrepreneur and philanthropist, is the founder of Access Industries, a privately-held, global industrial group.

“By establishing this landmark fellowship at Penn, we hope to empower talented students to pursue high-risk, high-reward projects in the lab,” said Mr. Blavatnik. “This investment in our future will benefit cutting-edge science now and over time as these trainees grow and drive innovation in their respective fields.”

Mr. Blavatnik’s forward-thinking philanthropy has made an impact in both the United States and abroad, enriching the research landscape and creating an elite community of creative and ambitious young scientists.

The Blavatnik Family Foundation is an active supporter of leading educational, scientific, cultural and charitable institutions in the United States, Europe and throughout the world. The Foundation is headed by Mr. Blavatnik, an American and British industrialist and philanthropist. He is the founder and chairman of Access Industries, a privately-held U.S. industrial group with global interests in natural resources, media, technology and real estate.

Nancy Hirschmann: Stanley I. Sheerr Term Professor in the Social Sciences

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caption: Nancy HirschmannNancy Hirschmann, professor of political science and a core faculty member in the Program on Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies, has been appointed the Stanley I. Sheerr Term Professor in the Social Sciences. A scholar of the history of political thought, analytical philosophy nand feminist theory, Dr. Hirschmann is the author of nine books and the recipient of many fellowships and awards, including the American Council of Learned Societies Fellowship and the European University Institute’s Fernand Braudel Senior Fellowship. Dr. Hirschmann has served as Vice President of the American Political Science Association and on the editorial boards of the Journal of Politics, Political Research Quarterly, Politics & Gender, Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy and Scandanavian Journal of Disability Research.

At Penn, she directed the Program on Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies and the Alice Paul Center for Research on Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies and also served as Graduate Chair and Vice Chair of the department of political science.

The Stanley I. Sheerr Term Professorship in the Social Sciences is named for the late Stanley I. Sheerr, W’37, the former chairman of Crown Textile Company. When Mr. Sheerr passed away in 1984, his family made a gift in his memory to support faculty in the social sciences. Mrs. Sheerr passed away in 1989, but her two children—Richard Sheerr, C’69, a former member of the Penn Arts & Sciences Board of Overseers, and Constance Sheerr Kittner, CW’61—remain active Penn supporters.

Joshua Klein and Annette Lareau: Kahn Endowed Term Professors

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caption: Joshua KleinTwo SAS faculty members have been appointed Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Term Professors.

Joshua Klein, professor of physics and astronomy, has been appointed the Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Endowed Term Professor of Physics and Astronomy. Dr. Klein is a high-energy physicist and an internationally recognized scholar of experimental particle physics, neutrinos and dark matter. He was a leading team member for the SNO experiment known for “Solving the Solar Neutrino Problem” that resulted in a share of the Nobel Prize in Physics with Art McDonald in 2015. Dr. Klein serves as the chair and spokesperson for the SNO+ and MiniCLEAN Experiments and has served as a member of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment Executive Committee. He is a recipient of the Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics and a Fellow of the American Physical Society.

At Penn, Dr. Klein’s excellent teaching has been recognized by the Provost’s Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching, and he has served as chair of the School of Arts & Sciences Curriculum Committee and as a member of the Provost’s Academic Planning & Budget Committee and the Faculty Senate Executive Committee.

caption: Annette LareauAnnette Lareau, professor of sociology, has been appointed Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Term Professor in the Social Sciences. Dr. Lareau, who has a secondary faculty appointment in GSE, is a scholar of social stratification, family, childhood and education. She is the author of six books, including Unequal Childhoods: Race, Class, and Family Life and Home Advantage: Social Class and Parental Intervention in Elementary Education, which won awards from the American Sociological Association and the American Educational Studies Association. Her research has been supported by the Russell Sage Foundation, the Spencer Foundation, the National Science Foundation and the Maryland Population Center. Dr. Lareau has served as president of the American Sociological Association.

The Kahn Endowed Term Chairs were established through a bequest by Mr. and Mrs. Edmund J. Kahn. Mr. Kahn was a 1925 Wharton graduate who had a highly successful career in the oil and natural gas industry. Mrs. Kahn, a graduate of Smith College, worked for Newsweek and owned an interior design firm. The couple supported many programs and projects at Penn, including Van Pelt-Dietrich Library, the Modern Languages College House program and other initiatives in scholarship and the humanities.

University Research Foundation: October 19

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The University Research Foundation (URF) is now accepting applications for its October 19 deadline.

The URF is an intramural program that provides three funding mechanisms: Research and Conference Support, Impact Seminar Grants and Research Opportunity Development Grants.

URF Research Grants and Conference Support provides up to $50,000 in project support and up to $3,000 for conference support. Its objectives are to:

  • help junior faculty undertake pilot projects that will enable them to successfully apply for extramural sources of funding and aid in establishing their careers as independent investigators;
  • help established faculty perform novel, pioneering research to determine project feasibility and develop preliminary data to support extramural grant applications;
  • provide support in disciplines where extramural support is difficult to obtain and where significant research can be facilitated with internal funding; and
  • provide limited institutional matching funds that are required as part of a successful external peer-reviewed application.

URF Impact Seminar Grants will make awards up to $20,000 for support for a cross-school, cross-disciplinary large-scale event to be held on Penn’s campus within a year of the award. Funding for this award can be used to augment an already scheduled University event. The event—which can be a symposium, forum or conference—should occur over one to two days and be open to the entire Penn community. It should highlight the scholarship of Penn faculty and bring distinguished scholars to Penn’s campus, with a particular focus on the University’s distinguishing strength in integrating knowledge. Documented school and/or department matching funds are required.

URF Research Opportunity Development Grants (RODG)

The Research Opportunity Grant program (Phase 1 and Phase 2) is designed to facilitate the intersection of the forward trajectory of Penn’s research frontiers with the trajectory of the national and global research priorities. RODG Applications should map on to emerging research areas with new opportunities for support. Awards from these programs should be used to develop preliminary information and data for new applications in these emerging research areas. The two programs are described at right.

Research Opportunity Development Grants: Phase 1

With an identified new research area in mind, Phase 1 grants enable a team to articulate the research focus, map Penn’s intellectual assets in the new area, coalesce the appropriate group of scholars,  identify Penn’s potential contributions in the area  in the context of national and international research initiatives and identify a funding target. Typically a Phase 1 proposal would lead to a Phase 2 application. In addition, special attention will be paid to project proposals that include mentorship of Penn undergraduates. Applications up to $10,000 will be considered.

Research Opportunity Development Grants: Phase 2

Phase 2 grants offer extensive support for up to two years to enable specific outcomes in support of a center or group proposal to an external funding organization. Activities include research workshops, preliminary studies, networking in the relevant research community, etc. Specific outcomes are expected. Documented matching department and/or school funds will be considered positively. In addition, special attention will be paid to project proposals that include mentorship of Penn undergraduates. Applications with requests between $50,000 to $200,000 will be considered.

Note that Phase 2 grants are not intended to support the development of proposals that respond to regular solicitations such as those for NIH RO1 grants or NSF Division programs. Applicants must identify a target of opportunity.

Disciplines for all award programs: Biomedical Sciences, Humanities, Natural Sciences and Engineering, Social Science and Management.

Undergraduate Participation: As part of the University’s commitment to providing research opportunities to scholars across our campus community, URF applicants are encouraged to include undergraduate student participants within the framework of their proposals.

Budget: Each URF program has separate budget requirements.

Eligibility for all award programs: Eligibility is limited to Penn assistant, associate and full professors, in any track. Instructors and research associates must provide a letter from their department chair establishing that the applicant will receive an appointment as an assistant professor by the time of the award. Adjunct faculty are not eligible to apply. Awards must be expended on University of Pennsylvania facilities, equipment and/or associated University technical staff and undergraduate students.

Detailed information, including application materials, can be found at http://research.upenn.edu/urf

Spring 2018 University Research Foundation Awards

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In the recent Spring 2018 cycle of Penn’s internally-funded University Research Foundation, the Office of the Vice Provost for Research announced awards (Conference and Seminar Support denoted by *) to the following members of the faculty for the projects listed below.

Spring 2018 University Research Foundation Awards

Erol Akçay, Biology, SAS, Evolution of social and genomic complexity

*Daud Ali, South Asia Studies, SAS, Money Use in Precolonial South Asia

Montserrat Anguera, Biomedical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Influence of altered X-linked gene dosage on the microbiome during autoimmunity

*Jaya Aysola, Office of Inclusion and Diversity, Perelman School of Medicine, Health Equity Week 2019

*Deborah Becker, School of Nursing, PennDemic: An Interprofessional Infectious Disease Outbreak Simulation

Paco Bravo, Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine, Somatostatin Receptor Imaging in Patients with Suspected Cardiac Sarcoidosis

Kathleen Brown, History, SAS, Beyond Free Speech and Safe Space: Reimagining Open Expression, Inclusion and Argument

Lily Brown, Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine, Integrating Suicide and Trauma-Focused Treatment to reduce Suicide Risk

Janis Burkhardt, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, A mouse model for X-linked moesin-associated immunodeficiency

Marija Drndic, Physics and Astronomy, SAS, Topological insulator nanoelectronic devices: engineering surface state towards spintronics and quantum computing applications

Roy Hamilton, Neurology, Perelman school of Medicine, Using Virtual Reality and Brain Stimulation to Detect and Characterize Spatial Neglect

Brent Helliker, Biology, SAS, The hydraulic legacy of C4 evolution: Phylogenetic, physiological and genetic controls on water transport in C3 and C4 grasses

*Joseph Kable, Psychology, SAS, Conference Support for the 2018 Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroeconomics

Sampath Kannan, CIS, Engineering and Applied Science, Understanding Communities and Relationships from Data

Bomyi Lim, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Engineering and Applied Science, Characterization of Pol II elongation rate in living embryos

Ignacio Lopez, Romance Languages, SAS, Archival Work—Galdos’ Rosalia manuscript

*Catriona MacLeod, Germanic Languages and Literature, SAS, Romantic Prints on the Move

Michele Margolis, Political Science, SAS, Competing identities, values, and preferences: white evangelical Christians in American politics

Ramah McKay, History and Sociology of Science, SAS, Making an African medical market: Private clinics and transnational capital in Mozambique and India

Marcy Norton, History, SAS, The Tame and the Wild: People and Animals after 1492

Aurelie Ouss, Criminology, SAS, Using Feedback to Improve Performance in Criminal Justice

Eugene Park, East Asian Languages and Civilizations, SAS, A Concise History of Korea

*Kevin Platt, Russian and East European Studies, SAS, Your Language—My Ear 2019: Russian and American Poetry in Conversation and Translation

*Guthrie Ramsey, Music, SAS, Sound, Gender, and the Color Line

Vincent Reina, City and Regional Planning, PennDesign, Rental vouchers and waitlists: barriers and impacts on neighborhood access and household welfare

Janine Remillard, Graduate School of Education, Improving Novice Teachers’ Instructional Practices in Mathematics: Translating Learning from Teacher Education

*Gareth Roberts, Linguistics, SAS, Penn Symposium on Cultural Evolution and Global Social Dynamics

*Adam Smith, East Asian Languages and Civilizations, SAS, Script and Sound in Old Chinese

Nancy Steinhardt, East Asian Languages and Civilizations, SAS, The Borders of Chinese Architecture

*James Sykes, Music, SAS, Sounding the Indian Ocean: Musical Circulations in the Afro-Asiatic Seascape

Patrick Walsh, Chemistry, SAS, New Polymerization Reactions with Organocatalysts

Joshua Wand, Biochemistry and Biophysics, Perelman School of Medicine, Positioning Entropy in Proteins for Exploitation for Drug Design

*Michael Weisberg, Philosophy, SAS, Killing Cats to Save Finches: Perspectives on Invasive Species and Conservation Policy

Richard Weller, Landscape Architecture, Design, Atlas for the End of the World—Atlas for the Beginning of the Anthropocene

Postdoctoral Fellowships for Academic Diversity: November 2

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The Vice Provost for Research, in partnership with the deans, established the Postdoctoral Fellowships for Academic Diversity to encourage a broad spectrum of candidates to pursue research careers in academia.

Now in its ninth year, the program seeks to attract promising researchers and educators from different backgrounds, races, ethnic groups and other diverse populations whose life experience, research experience and employment background will contribute significantly to the University’s academic mission. Fellowships are available for postdoctoral training in all areas of study at Penn.

Fellows receive a stipend of $50,000 in year 1, with $2,000 increments in years 2 and 3, as well as annual allowances for travel ($2,000) and research ($5,000) and a one-time relocation allowance of $5,000. The University also provides a medical, vision, dental and life insurance benefits package. Successful candidates will receive highly mentored scholarly and research training, as well as courses and workshops to enhance their research success skills.

The application deadline is November 2, 2018. Complete details about the program can be found at http://research.upenn.edu/postdoc

Deaths

Kofi Annan, 2005 Commencement Speaker

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Kofi Annan, Ghanaian diplomat, the seventh Secretary General of the United Nations and the first black African to hold that position, and 2001 recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, died August 18 in Bern, Switzerland, after a short illness. He was 80.

Mr. Annan was Penn’s 2005 Commencement Speaker (Almanac May 24, 2005); he received an honorary degree from the University at that time.

Aretha Franklin, Honorary Degree Recipient

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Aretha Franklin, one of America’s best singing voices of all time who was known as “The Queen of Soul,” died at her home in Detroit on August 16 from pancreatic cancer. She was 76.

Ms. Franklin received an honorary degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 2007 (Almanac May 13, 2007).

Robert Gelfand, Institute for Environmental Medicine

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caption: Bob GelfandRobert (Bob) Gelfand, senior investigator, engineering supervisor and assistant director of core systems at Penn’s Institute for Environmental Medicine (IFEM) in the Perelman School of Medicine, died August 26. He was 90.

Born in Norwich, Connecticut, Mr. Gelfand joined the US Navy in 1946 and trained as an electronic technician. He served in the reserves 1948-1953 while attending Yale, where he received his BA in engineering in 1952 and his master’s in electrical engineering in 1954.

Mr. Gelfand worked at Penn for 59 years. He was hired in 1954 by Christian J. Lambertsen, professor of medicine and pioneer in undersea and aerospace research, to help develop the hyperbaric chamber system. Dr. Lambertsen and Mr. Gelfand designed the chamber system that was used in a pioneering study of the effects of oxygen at hyperbaric pressures on the lung function of human volunteers. The Institute for Environmental Medicine (IFEM) was established to oversee chamber operations, and Mr. Gelfand’s University appointment was changed from pharmacology to the IFEM.

Mr. Gelfand began his career at Penn as an instrument designer at the Moore School of Electrical Engineering (now SEAS). Mr. Gelfand went on to serve as an assistant instructor, then instructor, and finally associate in pharmacology. He was the assistant director for bioengineering of the IFEM 1969-1986, and he served as assistant director/core systems of the IFEM 1986-2012. He held positions as IFEM’s engineering supervisor and a senior investigator with the Institute; a principal investigator for National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute; and a collaborating investigator for NASA Research Project and for the US Navy Hyperoxia Research Program. Mr. Gelfand participated in the ongoing research of the IFEM,  authoring or co-authoring 40 published papers and more than 70 abstracts and scientific presentations.

Mr. Gelfand remained an important member of the hyperbaric chamber supervisory team following transfer of the Hyperbaric Oxygen Program from the IFEM to emergency medicine in January 2013. Although he stopped actively working later that year due to his health, he continued to consult with his IFEM colleagues.

Mr. Gelfand is survived by his wife, Mildred; brother, Samuel; sister, Miriam; son, Martin (C’84); daughters, Lois (C’88; G’04), and Karen (C’93; M’01); and two grandchildren.

Richard V. Kadison, Mathematics

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caption: Dick KadisonRichard V. (Dick) Kadison, the Gustave C. Kuemmerle Professor of Mathematics, died after a short illness on August 22. He was 93.

Dr. Kadison was born in New York City, attended the Bronx High School of Science, the City College of New York and the University of Chicago, where he earned his PhD in 1950. During World War II, he was a US Navy lieutenant.

Dr. Kadison served for many years as a senior member of Columbia’s mathematics department before coming to Penn in 1964 as part of the mid-1960s modernization and buildup of Penn’s mathematics department, a project undertaken by then-Provost David Goddard and then-Chairman Oscar Goldman. Provost Goddard gave up his own chair (the Gustave C. Kuemmerle Chair) to help attract Dr. Kadison to Penn. Dr. Kadison held the chair for the rest of his life.

At Penn, Dr. Kadison was instrumental in building a world-famous group in functional analysis and operator theory; in the 1970s, this was a great attraction for people to visit Penn’s mathematics department. The area of operator theory is not only pure mathematics, but it has deep connections to quantum mechanics, quantum field theory, probability theory and other areas of mathematics. Dr. Kadison worked tirelessly at the subject and its applications, and he was known worldwide.

Dr. Kadison was a member of the US National Academy of Sciences and a foreign member of the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. He was a 1969 Guggenheim Fellow. In 1999, he was awarded the Leroy P. Steele Prize for Lifetime Achievement by the American Mathematical Society and in 2012 he became a fellow of the American Mathematical Society. A few months before his passing, he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (Almanac May 1, 2018).

Dr. Kadison is survived by his wife, Karen; and his son, Lars (Marit). There will be a conference held in his memory April 5-7, 2019. More info to come; see www.math.upenn.edu/

John McCain, 2001 Commencement Speaker

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John McCain, former US Naval aviator and Vietnam War POW, and Republican congressman and senator for the state of Arizona, died August 25 from a malignant brain tumor. He was 81.

Senator McCain was Penn’s 2001 Commencement Speaker, at which time he also received an honorary degree (Almanac May 29, 2001).

Pat Miller, DAR

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caption: Pat MillerPatricia (Pat) Miller, an employee of the Office of Development and Alumni Relations  (DAR) for 42 years, died August 30. She was 59.

According to John Zeller, DAR senior vice president,
Ms. Miller “played an integral part in laying the groundwork and instituting many of the policies and procedures currently in place in Advancement Research and Analysis, as well as other Development units across the University. Her tireless efforts have boosted efficiency and accuracy in managing DAR’s vast prospect pool, ensuring that the University can maintain its fundraising prowess and uphold its tradition of excellence.”

As trainer for the Integrated Database, Ms. Miller trained scores of DAR alumni. She also served as coach of the DAR Buck$ softball team for 36 years.

Ms. Miller is survived by her sister, Barbara; her brother, Francis (Karen); her niece, Lauren Del Valle; and her nephews, Ryan Lickfeld, and James, Kevin and Sean.

Donations in her memory may be made to the Abramson Cancer Center at Penn, 3535 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 191904.

Theodore Sande, Architecture

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Theodore Sande, former lecturer in the department of architecture, died August 11 from congestive heart failure. He was 84.

Dr. Sande was born in New London, Connecticut. He earned his BS in architecture from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1956, then served in the US Navy. He earned his master’s of architecture from Yale in 1961. He joined an architecture firm in Providence, Rhode Island. He was there until it closed in 1970.

Dr. Sande then earned his PhD in philosophy from Penn in 1972. During his time in school at Penn, he served as a teaching fellow in GSFA, now the School of Design. He was a lecturer in architecture, 1976-1977. He had stints as a visiting lecturer or adjunct at Rensselaer, Williams, Case Western, Cleveland State and Ursuline College.

He worked for the National Trust for Historic Preservation, 1975-1981, where he rose to vice president in the office of historic properties. He then served as executive director of the Western Reserve Historical Society, 1981-1993, and he was a member of the Cleveland Landmarks Commission, 1985-2004. He was co-founder and first president of the Society for Industrial Archaeology.

He is survived by his wife, Solvieg Inga-Maj Imselius; his children, Susanne and Lars; and three grandchildren.

Raymond Trent, Law Library

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Raymond F. Trent, a retired clerk at Penn’s Biddle Law Library, died August 7. He was 86.

Mr. Trent was hired in 1964 as a library assistant at Penn’s law library. In 1968, he was promoted to senior library clerk, and he retired in 2013 after nearly 50 years.

In recognition of Mr. Trent’s ongoing interest in the African-American lawyer, a portion of the library’s collection consisting primarily of biographies on African-American lawyers has been named in his honor.

Mr. Trent is survived by his wife, Gwendolyn; and many nieces, nephews and friends.

Governance

September Council Meeting

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The first University Council meeting of the new academic year was held on Wednesday, September 5 in Houston Hall’s Bodek Lounge. Provost Wendell Pritchett welcomed everyone and said that President Amy Gutmann sends her regards but was on University business. Provost Pritchett announced the appointment of Caryn Lerman as this year’s moderator; she is the John H. Glick, M.D. Professor in Cancer Research at the Perelman School of Medicine. The Provost also announced the appointment of Lauren Steinfeld, chief privacy officer for Penn Medicine and senior advisor for privacy for the University, as the parliamentarian for a fourth year.

Jennifer Pinto-Martin, chair of the Steering Committee, announced the four focus issues for the year: there will be presentations on the following areas—Arts at Penn and the Sachs Program, the Power of Penn Campaign, Campaign for Wellness and Penn First. Dr. Pinto-Martin mentioned that Open Forum sessions will be held on December 5 and on February 20.

Provost Pritchett introduced the presentation and discussion on Penn’s Theme Year and Penn Reading Project, then turned it over to Beth Winkelstein and David Fox. Dr. Winkelstein thanked the President and Provost for their support and the committee that makes the recommendations about the theme and the PRP book. Mr. Fox noted that this year’s theme, the Year of Why and the PRP book, The Bridge of San Luis Rey by Thornton Wilder, offer many opportunities for integrating knowledge since the book raises philosophical and religious questions. He said that there will be a multidisciplinary event pertaining to these topics later this year.

There are grants available for relevant programs that are proposed by groups such as the College House communities or others from the Penn community. There are normally about 60-80 events supported each year with grants of approximately $500 each.

The 2019-2020 academic year will be the Year of Data, as proposed by Bethany Wiggin, associate professor of Germanic languages and literatures and Penn Program in the Environmental Humanities founding director, along with David Toccafondi, manager of the Vitale Digital Media Lab in the Weigle Information Commons at Van Pelt-Dietrich Library. The PRP book will be Weapons of Math Destruction by Cathy O’Neil.

Mr. Fox noted that any member of the Penn community may submit ideas for future years’ topics. Email him at dfox@upenn.edu

WXPN Policy Board Meeting: September 25

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The next meeting of the WXPN Policy Board will take place on Tuesday, September 25, at noon at WXPN, 3025 Walnut Street. For more information call 215-898-0628 during business hours.

Honors

Joan Gluch: Faculty-Community Partnership Award

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caption: Joan GluchThe Barbara and Edward Netter Center for Community Partnerships recently selected Joan Gluch and Philadelphia FIGHT as co-recipients of the third annual Netter Center Faculty-Community Partnership Award. The winners will share $5,000 to further develop and expand projects that promote community oral health.

Dr. Gluch is associate dean for academic policies, and division chief and professor of clinical community oral health, at Penn’s School of Dental Medicine. She and her students have worked with Philadelphia FIGHT, a health services organization for people living with or at high risk for HIV/AIDS, since 2003, providing comprehensive dental health services, oral health education and community oral health assessments.

The award recognizes not only Dr. Gluch’s collaboration with Philadelphia FIGHT and a number of other community partners but also her work on academically based community service (ABCS) courses at Penn.

Nancy Hodgson: PA Long-Term Care Council

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Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf has appointed Penn Nursing’s Nancy Hodgson, the Anthony Buividas Endowed Term Chair in Gerontology and associate professor of nursing, to his 35-member Long-Term Care Council.

The Council makes recommendations to improve the Commonwealth’s long-term services and support systems with respect to regulations, licensure and financing for appropriate departments and agencies. It affords members the opportunity to directly impact the quality of care provided to older adults and persons living with disabilities. Dr. Hodgson is the co-founder of the Palliative Care Program at the Madlyn and Leonard Abramson Center (formerly the Philadelphia Geriatric Center), one of the first nursing-home based palliative care programs in the nation.

Carl June: Albany Prize

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Carl June, Richard W. Vague Professor in Immunotherapy in the department of pathology and laboratory medicine at Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine, the director of the Center for Cellular Immunotherapies in the Abramson Cancer Center, and the director of the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapies in PSOM at Penn, is one of three scientists to receive the 2018 Albany Medical Center Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research. Dr. June is receiving the award for his pioneering work in developing CAR T therapy, which became the nation’s first FDA-approved personalized cellular therapy for cancer in August 2017 and was approved for additional indications earlier this year (Almanac Septenber 12, 2017).

The prize will be awarded during a celebration on September 26 in Albany, New York. Albany Medical Center has given out the $500,000 award annually since 2001 to those “who have altered the course of medical research.”

Michael Kahana and Sharon Thompson-Schill: Psychonomic Society Mid-Career Award

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Sharon Thompson-Schill, Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Psychology and chair of the department of psychology, and psychology professor Michael Kahana recently received the inaugural psychonomic Society Mid-Career Award, given for exceptional contributions to the field of experimental and cognitive psychology.

Dr. Thompson-Schill is also the founding director of MindCORE (Center for Outreach, Research and Education), a School of Arts & Sciences initiative that unites researchers and programs across the University involving human intelligence and behavior to promote multidisciplinary collaboration. Her lab studies the biological bases of human cognitive systems. She uses a combination of psychological and neuroscientific methods, in both healthy and brain-damaged individuals, to study complex thought and behavior, including topics in perception, memory, attention, language, personality and creativity.

Dr. Kahana studies human memory and its neural mechanisms, especially episodic memory, spatial memory and recognition memory. His current research focus, funded by the US Department of Defense, is the Restoring Active Memory (RAM) project, an effort aimed at developing next-generation technologies to restore memory function in people who suffer from memory loss due to disease or traumatic injury.

Kathleen Stebe: Langmuir Lectureship Award

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Kathleen Stebe, Penn Engineering’s deputy dean for research and Richer & Elizabeth Goodwin Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, was one of two recipients of the 2018 Langmuir Lectureship Award.

The award, presented by the American Chemical Society’s Division of Colloid & Surface Chemistry and its journal, Langmuir, recognizes individuals working in the interdisciplinary field of colloid and surface chemistry. Langmuir lecturers are recognized for being outstanding scientists who display remarkable creativity in using fundamental research in colloid and interface science to develop new materials and devices.

Dr. Stebe’s research focuses on directed assembly in soft matter, including particles interacting by capillarity on interfaces, and particle assembly in complex fluids, liquid crystals and lipid bilayers. Recently, Dr. Stebe published a study showing how a specialized liquid mixture known as a bicontinuous interfacially jammed emulsion gel, or bijel, can be used to make nanoparticle-studded filters that don’t get clogged with slimy build-up.

“Professor Stebe’s insights have produced new paradigms to understand, control and exploit fluid interfaces far from equilibrium, touching fields from materials assembly to microfluidics and biology. She conducts elegant experiments supported by analysis and simulations that clearly demonstrate new concepts,” noted Langmuir editor-in-chief Françoise Winnik.

PennDesign, Ken Lum and David Hartt: Pew Grant, Fellowships

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PennDesign earned a $300,000 project grant for Design With Nature Now, a trio of public exhibitions scheduled to go on view in the summer of 2019. Ken Lum, professor and chair of the department of fine arts, and David Hartt, assistant professor of fine arts, received Pew fellowships of $75,000.

Organized by The Ian L. McHarg Center and the Architectural Archives at PennDesign in collaboration with the Ross Gallery, Design With Nature Now comprises three parallel exhibitions and related programs focused on expanding the public’s understanding of ecological approaches to design first championed by legendary environmental planner Ian L. McHarg, emeritus professor of landscape architecture and regional planning at Penn, and author of Design With Nature (1969). The Design With Nature Now exhibitions will complement an international conference at PennDesign and forthcoming publication from The Lincoln Institute of Land Policy.

Working across mediums, Mr. Lum explores the formation of individual and societal identities as they are expressed within the context of public space. Mr. Lum is planning a project on memory and history using decorative mirrors traditionally found in Chinese restaurants.

Mr. Hartt’s multidisciplinary work considers the history of social and cultural ideals in relation to the built environment. Mr. Hartt was also commissioned by the Beth Sholom Synagogue Preservation Foundation, which received a $300,000 project grant from the Pew Center, to create a site-responsive, multimedia installation at Beth Sholom Synagogue in Elkins Park, offering new ways to experience and interpret the Frank Lloyd Wright–designed National Historic Landmark.

Penn Nursing: #1 International Ranking

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Penn’s School of Nursing recently earned the top spot in ShanghaiRanking’s annual report on the best nursing programs in the world. Penn Nursing was awarded #1 on the list last year as well.

The Global Ranking of Academic Subjects for 2018—regarded as one of the most influential—scores the programs based on transparent methodology and third-party data, using six objective indicators including faculty awards and the number and impact of published studies.

“This affirms Penn Nursing’s global standing as a world-class institution for nursing education, research and practice,” said Penn Nursing Dean Antonia Villarruel. “We are proud of the ranking and even more proud of the impact we make every day in the lives of patients, families and communities.”

Penn Presbyterian, CHOP: US News’ Best Hospitals

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Hospitals of the University of Pennsylvania-Penn Presbyterian and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) both received high rankings in US News & World Report’s most recent Best Hospitals Rankings and Ratings list.

Penn Presby ranked #14 on the publication’s Best Hospitals Honor Roll, #1 in Pennsylvania and in the Philadelphia metro area, and it was nationally ranked in 12 adult specialties and rated high performing in one adult specialty and six procedures and conditions.

CHOP ranked #3 on the Best Children’s Honor Roll and was nationally ranked in 10 pediatric specialties, including #1 in pediatric diabetes and endocrinology and in pediatric urology; #2 for pediatric cancer, neonatology, pediatric orthopedics and pediatric pulmonology; and #3 in pediatric gastroenterology and GI surgery.

US News analyzed data from nearly 5,000 medical centers and survey responses from more than 30,000 physicians to rank hospitals in 16 adult specialties. Survival rates, patient safety, specialized staff and hospital reputation were among the factors weighed. The Honor Roll recognizes 20 hospitals for their exceptional care for complex cases across these specialties, and it recognizes hospitals by state, metro and regional areas for their work in nine more widely performed procedures and conditions.

Penn Medicine: Forbes’ #2 Best Employers for Women

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Penn Medicine was recently awarded the #2 spot in Forbes’ new “America’s Best Employers for Women” ranking. Forbes partnered with market research company Statista to create the list. Statista surveyed 40,000 Americans, including 25,000 women, working for businesses with at least 1,000 employees. All the surveys were anonymous, allowing participants to openly share their opinions.

Penn Medicine’s ranking is credited “thanks in part to professional development programs that aim to accelerate women into leadership roles by means of mentorship opportunities and skill-building workshops. These initiatives, coupled with a culture of equality, have empowered the women who make up 77% of Penn Medicine’s workforce to claim 55% of the company’s executive positions and five of the seven CEO roles at the health system’s hospitals.”

Features

Ronald O. Perelman Center for Political Science and Economics: A New Home in a Centrally Located Building

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Ronald O. Perelman Center for Political Science and Economics Open House: September 21

On Friday, September 21, 3-5 p.m., SAS will host an afternoon of short talks, refreshments, and tours of the new Ronald O. Perelman Center for Political Science and Economics, a vibrant new social science teaching and research hub that beautifully combines a contemporary addition with a renovation of the historically significant former West Philadelphia Trust Building at 133 S. 36th Street.

  • enjoy presentations from faculty and students
  • visit the academic centers housed in the building
  • get your photo with the Philadelphia skyline as the backdrop at the Selfie Station on the Alber-Klingelhofer Terrace
  • indulge in specialty ice cream from Little Baby’s and delicious international street food at stations throughout the building

caption: Exterior view of the building in present day. Photograph by Jackson Betz.In 2013, prominent Penn alumnus Ronald O. Perelman, CEO and chairman of MacAndrews & Forbes, Inc., donated a $25 million gift to the University of Pennsylvania (Almanac February 5, 2013). The gift allowed Penn to embark on a project to consolidate the University’s economic and political science departments within the School of Arts & Sciences, as well as other policy-related organizations including the Center for the Advanced Study of India (CASI), the Center for the Study of Contemporary China (CSCC), and the Penn Program on Democracy, Citizenship and Constitutionalism (DCC), in a single building.

Penn hired Toronto’s KPMB Architects to renovate the existing space and design an addition to the rear, at the corner of 36th and Sansom Streets, that would combine departmental office space with study space for students (Almanac January 27, 2015). KPMB Architects, led by designer Shirley Blumberg (Almanac April 3, 2018), designed an addition with a steel and glass façade that would complement the original building’s vertical fenestration, and renovated the interior of the original building to complement the newly-designed interior of the addition. 

caption: Interior of the building, present day. Photograph by Jackson Betz.The new building, which recently opened to the public, will have an Open House next Friday. It furthers Penn’s initiative of integrating historic and innovative, modern architecture on its campus. The completed building features 100,000 square feet of study, seminar and office space, including several sizes of classrooms. The new addition replicates the scale of the original portion of the building, including its striking double-height ground floor. The new addition emphasizes visibility, with many rooms featuring glass walls that allow their occupants to interact with people in interior common spaces and outside. The main entrance is located on 36th Street, near the intersection of the old and new buildings. Despite the large expanses of windows, the building is targeted for LEED Silver certification.

The Perelman Center for Political Science and Economics has a rich history, and though it is situated in the heart of Penn campus, not all of its history involves Penn. The West Philadelphia Title and Trust Company Building (its original name) came into existence as an early example of Penn involving itself in the construction of buildings on its campus. The University-owned corner had previously housed twin fraternity mansions, but in 1924, the University demolished the houses and sold building rights to the West Philadelphia Title and Trust Company, whose president was looking to expand from its former location at 40th and Lancaster Avenues. In turn, the bank hired Davis, Dunlap and Barney, an architectural firm of former students of influential industrial architect Paul Philippe Cret, to design a new bank building. These architects created a sleek Art Deco low-rise limestone skyscraper with ornate columns, copper details, and stone carvings, designed by sculptor Joseph Bass.

caption: The building in the 1950s. Photograph from the Free Library of Philadelphia.The building opened in 1926 and business was so successful that the bank company commissioned the firm McIlvain and Roberts to build an addition. It was completed in 1928, and that same year West Philadelphia Title and Trust Company ran into trouble. Integrity Trust Company bought them out and hired Cret himself to add new façade details. In 1940, Integrity Trust Company dissolved. Soon the building had several tenants; American Law Institute and American College of Life Underwriters occupied most of the building, but both had moved elsewhere by 1965. In 1967, the Girard Bank moved in. It was the first bank in the area to have ATMs, and as a result, many Penn students and community members remembered it fondly as the Girard Bank Building, even after its name had been changed. Penn purchased the building, but the retail space remained a bank until 2002, when Penn had the building renovated. When it reopened in 2003, an Ann Taylor store opened on the ground floor (Almanac July 15, 2003).

Events

Penn Libraries Showcases Intrepid Women Who Made Their Mark 

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caption: Rodeo Poster, Milwaukee, 1905Visitors to the exhibit OK, I’ll Do It Myself: Narratives of Intrepid Women in the American Wilderness will be greeted by items illustrating the experiences of intelligent, exuberant and indomitable women navigators of the North and South American wilderness. Items in this monumental exhibit, spanning five centuries, are on display at the Penn Libraries thanks to the generosity and exceptional collecting prowess of Caroline Schimmel, CW’67. 

“I fell in love with Caroline Schimmel’s collection the instant I opened the first box of her 2014 gift of fiction to the Penn Libraries,” said Regan Kladstrup, director of special collections processing in the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts at the Penn Libraries. “Getting to know Caroline and, later, seeing her astounding non-fiction collection of books, manuscripts and art by and about women in the American wilderness only deepened my appreciation.” 

The product of 45 years of collecting and research, Caroline Schimmel’s exhibition OK, I’ll Do It Myself includes 145 books, photographs, manuscripts and memorabilia ranging from Metamorphosis Insectorum Surinamensium, German-born naturalist and illustrator Maria Sibylla Merian’s monumental 1705 study of the flora and fauna of Surinam, to sharpshooter and entertainer Annie Oakley’s travel trunk and gloves. 

caption: Annie Oakley, London 1891“For anyone working on larger issues around women and settlement, Caroline Schimmel’s collection is an invaluable resource. Researchers don’t always know exactly what they’re looking for, or what they will find,” said Lynne Farrington, senior curator, Special Collections. “As an academic, you may think you’re going down one path only to make discoveries within collections that change the course of your research, setting you off down other, and often more interesting, paths. That’s what great collections do—they provide you with opportunities to make important discoveries.” 

OK, I’ll Do It Myself spans the entirety of the Kamin and Goldstein Family galleries as well as spaces on the fifth and sixth floor of Van Pelt-Dietrich Library Center. The public is invited to explore this exhibit, free of charge, now through November 11. The exhibit will be open for extended hours on the evening of Thursday, October 4, in conjunction with the Annenberg Center performance of Zora Returns to Harlem, a one-woman show, performed by Antoniá Badón, about the life of acclaimed novelist and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston. See https://www.annenbergcenter.org/event/zora-returns-to-harlem

For information on the exhibit visit: http://www.library.upenn.edu/exhibits/schimmel.html 

Photographs Courtesy of Caroline F. Schimmel Collection of Women in the American Wilderness

Help Bring Music to Those Who Need it Most

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Bring the family to this scenic USATF certified 5K run to support WXPN Musicians On Call. Enjoy the course through beautiful Penn Park at the University of Pennsylvania.

New this year: WXPN has  added a separate approximately 1-mile course just for walkers they are calling the “Funky Miler!” So now you can run, walk or funk your way to help raise funds for this great cause.

Register at http://www.xpn.org/events/xpn-5k-run

Registrants get a free T-shirt (when signed up in advance) and entry into the Post-Race ’80s Dance Party with DJ Robert Drake at World Cafe Live! $5 entry to Dance Party if not registered for XPN 5K (payable at the door).

Not up for racing but want to join the fun?

Stop by to cheer on the runners and then join them for the post-race “Rock of the 80s” Dance Party with DJ Robert Drake. Wristbands are available for a donation of $5 or more.

Musicians On Call Benefit 5K Run at Penn Park, 3100 Lower Walnut Street on Sunday, October 7, rain or shine, 8-11 a.m. (run starts 8:30 a.m.)

$40 Early Bird Registration Fee

$50 Advance Registration Fee

$60 Onsite Registration at Packet Pickup/Race Day

$25 Students (All Times)

(Limited number of student registrations available. Must present valid ID if 18 or older.) 
NOTE: Baby strollers and dogs are not permitted on the 5K course. Baby strollers are allowed on the Funky Miler walking course only. 

Life Saving Measures Program: September 21

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Join PennReady on Friday, September 21, from noon to 2 p.m. for its Life Saving Measures program. Learn how to stay safe with lessons about fire sprinklers, emergency notifications, emergency procedures, Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs). All will be held at Hamilton Field at 40th St between Locust Walk and Walnut St. The rain date is the following Friday, September 28.

Supplier Show: September 25

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The annual Supplier Show hosted by Penn Purchasing Services will be held on Tuesday, September 25 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts at 3680 Walnut Street. Learn about the innovative supplier solutions from the approximately 50 exhibitors and sponsoring organizations that will be there. Attendees will discover what’s new in procurement categories such as office supplies, print and design, computers and AV, travel, computer peripherals, furniture and stationery.

Plus, you can “go green” at the show and exchange surplus office supplies at the Ben’s Attic Office Supplies Pop-Up Store. 

At 12:15 p.m., there will be a presentation of the University’s Green Purchasing Award 2018 recipients who will be recognized and receive their awards.

Attendees are encouraged to pre register at http://cms.business-services.upenn.edu/purchasing/special-event

Check the event website, for updates about exhibitors that will be in attendance. Lunch will be served. Remember—bring your PennCard to be eligible for door prizes.

Crimes

Weekly Crime Reports

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The University of Pennsylvania Police Department Community Crime Report

Below are the Crimes Against Persons, Crimes Against Society and Crimes Against Property from the campus report for August 27-September 2, 2018View prior weeks' reports—Ed.

This summary is prepared by the Division of Public Safety and includes all criminal incidents reported and made known to the University Police Department between the dates of August 27-September 2, 2018. The University Police actively patrol from Market St to Baltimore and from the Schuylkill River to 43rd St in conjunction with the Philadelphia Police. In this effort to provide you with a thorough and accurate report on public safety concerns, we hope that your increased awareness will lessen the opportunity for crime. For any concerns or suggestions regarding this report, please call the Division of Public Safety at (215) 898-4482.

08/28/18          2:06 AM           4020 Spruce St            Male wanted on warrant/Arrest

08/28/18          12:25 PM         3333 Walnut St            Secured bike taken from bike rack

08/29/18          2:15 AM           4100 Spruce St            Laptop taken by male

08/29/18          2:22 AM           4100 Baltimore Ave      Male wanted on probation violation/Arrest

08/29/18          12:32 PM         3400 Spruce St            Firearms violation/Arrest

08/29/18          1:52 PM           4100 Baltimore Ave      Secured bike taken from bike rack

08/30/18          1:42 PM           3400 Spruce St            Violation of the Uniform Firearm Act/Arrest

08/31/18          9:48 AM           233 S 33rd St               Unsecured bike taken

08/31/18          10:41 AM         3928 Spruce St            Unsecured chairs removed from porch

08/31/18          1:28 PM           3701 Locust Walk        Complainant receiving harassing emails

08/31/18          3:36 PM           231 S 34th St               Laptop taken

08/31/18          4:20 PM           3320 Smith Walk          Property taken

08/31/18          4:20 PM           219 S 33rd St               Secured backpack taken

09/01/18          4:08 PM           3400 Spruce St            Unsecured wallet taken from locker

09/02/18          9:00 AM           4000 Ludlow St            Complainant assaulted and robbed by unknown males

09/02/18          10:28 PM         3700 Spruce St            Intoxicated driver/Arrest

18th District

Below are the Crimes Against Persons from the 18th District: 5 incidents (1 assault, 1 aggravated assault, 1 domestic assault and 2 robberies) with 1 arrest were reported between August 27-September 2, 2018 by the 18th District covering the Schuylkill River to 49th Street & Market Street to Woodland Avenue.

08/27/18         1:57 AM          3604 Chestnut St         Robbery

08/29/18         11:19 AM        4600 Locust St             Assault

08/29/18         5:16 PM           429 S 46th St              Aggravated Assault/Arrest

09/02/18         3:36 PM           4210 Samson St          Domestic Assault

09/02/18         9:01 PM           40th & Walnut St          Robbery

Bulletins

Planning an Event? Email Almanac

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Mounting an exhibit? Orchestrating a concert? Planning a play? Showing a film? Let Almanac know so it can be included in the monthly AT PENN calendar!

Almanac’s monthly AT PENN calendar is the only all-inclusive calendar of Penn events on campus. With a readership in print and online, a free listing in the AT PENN increases visibility and attendance.

Email us at almanac@upenn.edu with your event details, including the event date, time, topic, speaker information and sponsors. For more information, visit https://almanac.upenn.edu/deadlines-for-submitting-at-penn-information

One Step Ahead: Don’t Succumb to “Peer” Pressure

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Another tip in a series provided by the Offices of Information Systems & Computing and Audit, Compliance & Privacy

Don’t Succumb to “Peer” Pressure

There are several ways in which malicious parties may attempt to lure you into surrendering financial assets to them. Some of the methods previously discussed here, along with advice on how to guard against them, include:

Recent news reports have highlighted an insidious new variation on these tactics. Attackers send email to their victims claiming to be in possession of compromising material, such as video footage obtained through a hijacked webcam. (A victim’s password is often included in the message, implying that the attacker has tapped into the victim’s devices and accounts.) The attacker then threatens to share the compromising material with all the victim’s contacts on email and social media unless financial payment is made.

The passwords used in these blackmailing scams were pulled from circulating lists of passwords compromised in large-scale data breaches, often years ago. A blanket email is sent to countless recipients in hopes that some individuals will panic and make payment.

When faced with these types of extortionary schemes:

  • Immediately change your password wherever it matches the one shown. Going forward, a password manager (like the University-supported product LastPass) can help you to create and keep track of strong passwords that can be easily changed as needed.  Also make sure that other information associated with your password, like email addresses or physical addresses, have not been altered. Learn more at https://www.isc.upenn.edu/how-to/lastpass
  • For peace of mind, consider covering your webcam when it is not in use. A bit of tape or a small Post-It note is enough to guard against unintended video- or image-sharing.
  • Do not pay. Attackers try to trick you into believing they possess compromising material which does not in fact exist. There is also no guarantee they will behave as promised upon payment.

Got 10 minutes? Make smart use of your time with the Information Security Essentials Online Training videos at https://www.isc.upenn.edu/security/aware/infosec_online-training

Calling All Scarecrows for Morris Arboretum’s 11th Annual Scarecrow Design Contest

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caption: Mo'ne Scare Throw

It’s time to start thinking scarecrows and Morris Arboretum’s Annual Scarecrow Design Contest! Use your ingenuity to create a scarecrow for this year’s theme: A Moment in Time, a significant occasion in the designer’s life that they associate with a single, public figure. These scarecrows may be a sports or film star, an artist or musician, a book character, chef or politician. 

Sign-up by Wednesday, September 26 to ensure your place in the contest. Entry fee is $25 for members and $30 for non-members with a $5 discount for those who reuse their wood frame from a past year. Straw, burlap, twine and frames for those who need them are all provided. Details and online registration are available at www.bit.ly/MAcrows

These scarecrows will be on display along Scarecrow Walk at the Oak Allée for more than four weeks, from Saturday, October 6 through Tuesday October 31. Now in its eleventh year and more popular than ever, Scarecrow Walk is a must see for the fall season. Visitors of all ages may vote for their favorite scarecrow to determine which will be the winners. Prizes will be awarded to the top five winning Scarecrow designers with $150 for the first-place winner.

FY2019 Penn Hotel Rates

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The Penn Hotels have announced their Fiscal Year 2019 rates.  They are:

  • Hilton Inn at Penn/$264 per night
  • Sheraton Philadelphia University City Hotel/$194 per night

Please make a note of these rates if you will be hosting out-of-town visitors or holding an event on campus this year.