News

Faculty Senate Leadership 2016-2017

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caption: Reed Pyeritzcaption: Laura Pernacaption: Santosh Venkatesh

Faculty Senate Leadership 2016-2017

The Faculty Senate announced its leadership for the upcoming academic year (left to right)—Past Chair: Reed Pyeritz, William Smilow Professor of Medicine and Genetics, chief, Division of Medical Genetics, Perelman School of Medicine; Chair: Laura Perna, James S. Riepe Professor, executive director, Alliance for Higher Education and Democracy, chair, Higher Education Division, Graduate School of Education; Chair Elect: Santosh Venkatesh, associate professor of electrical & systems engineering, Penn School of Engineering and Applied Science.

See the May 10 issue of Almanac for the Supplement containing the annual Senate Committee reports.

2016 PennDesign Teaching Awards

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2016 PennDesign Teaching Awards

These awards were presented by Dean Marilyn Jordan Taylor at the School of Design Awards Ceremony on May 15 on Meyerson Plaza.

G. Holmes Perkins Distinguished Teaching Award for Standing Faculty

caption: Amy HillierThis award is given annually based on input from graduate students at PennDesign, in recognition of distinguished teaching and innovation in the classroom, seminar or studio. This year’s recipient, Amy Hillier, a professor in the department of city planning, teaches courses relating to geographic information systems, the built environment, public health and community development. She explores issues of geographic disparities and access to services and resources in disadvantaged communities, such as redlining and housing discrimination, affordable housing and public health access. One student said, “Amy is a truly inspirational lecturer. She cares passionately about everything she teaches but she also cares passionately about her students. She challenges us to think outside our own experiences and to consider the lives and situations of others.”

G. Holmes Perkins Distinguished Teaching Award for Associated Faculty

caption: Cindy SandersThis award is given annually based on the input from the graduate students in recognition of distinguished teaching and innovation in the classroom, seminar or studio. This year’s recipient, Cindy Sanders, an adjunct professor in the department of landscape architecture, is chief executive officer/partner at OLIN and a Fellow of the American Society of Landscape Architects. Her prominent projects include the Carnegie Hall Rooftop in New York City and the Delaware River Waterfront Master Plan in Philadelphia. A student said, “It’s easy to have many instructors, hard to get one mentor. Cindy took on this path with her revolutionary new course Transformational Leadership, and generously shared her personal experiences to guide us to find our own voices deep within.”

G. Holmes Perkins Distinguished Undergraduate Teaching Award

caption: Joshua FreeseThis award is given based on the input of undergraduate students to recognize distinguished teaching and innovation in the classroom, seminar or studio. It rotates each year between the architecture and fine arts undergraduate departments. This year’s recipient, Joshua Freese, a lecturer in the department of architecture, is an architectural designer. He teaches design studios and seminars in graduate and undergraduate architecture and has also taught in the landscape architecture department. He recently established Studio JF and has previously collaborated with offices like HWKN and !Melk. His teaching and design work explore the range of aesthetic effects and computational techniques of geometric tiling and tessellation systems and their application in architecture and design. One student said, “Josh was the most caring and dedicated professor I’ve had at Penn. He has a special talent for bringing out the best in his students, and helping them to become the types of designers they wish to be.”

2016 Penn Dental Medicine Teaching Awards

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Penn Dental Medicine faculty members were honored for excellence in teaching at the School’s Senior Farewell, held on May 10 at the Hyatt at the Bellevue in Center City Philadelphia. Each academic year, the graduating class recognizes members of the faculty with teaching awards, presented at this annual event that celebrates the passage of students to professional dentistry and welcomes them into the Penn Dental Medicine Alumni Society.

The Basic Science Award

caption: Faizan AlawiThis award is presented for excellence in teaching within the basic sciences. This year’s recipient is Faizan Alawi, an associate professor of pathology and assistant dean for curriculum. A member of the Penn Dental Medicine faculty since 2001, Dr. Alawi teaches oral and maxillofacial pathology for students in the School’s predoctoral and postdoctoral programs, as well as to Penn Medicine students and residents. Dr. Alawi also serves as director of Penn Oral Pathology Services. He was previously recognized with the Basic Science Award in 2010.

The Robert E. DeRevere Award

caption: Francis SmithgallThis award is presented for excellence in preclinical teaching by a part-time faculty member. The award is named in honor of Dr. DeRevere, a member of the Penn Dental Medicine Class of 1945, who served on the School’s faculty. This year’s recipient is Francis J. Smithgall, C’79, D’83, a clinical associate professor of restorative dentistry. A member of the School’s faculty since 1984, Dr. Smithgall is course director for Removable Partial Dentures and teaches predoctoral dental students in the general restorative dentistry laboratory. He was previously recognized with the DeRevere Award in 1990, 2010 and 2011.

The Joseph L. T. Appleton Award

caption: Marianne ContinoThis award is presented to a part-time faculty member for excellence in clinical teaching. This year’s recipient is Marianne Contino. Dr. Contino, a dental hygienist, has been instructing students in the predoctoral clinics since 2008. The Appleton Award is named in honor of Dr. Joseph Appleton, a 1914 alumnus of Penn Dental Medicine, who served as dean of the School from 1941 to 1951. The award was founded in 1979 by Abram Cohen, a member of the Class of 1923 and father of Dean Emeritus D. Walter Cohen, Class of 1950.

Senior Class’s Outstanding Teaching Award

caption: Scott OdellThis award is presented to a faculty member who has gone beyond the scope of his/her responsibilities to significantly impact the class’s education at Penn Dental Medicine. This year the Senior Outstanding Teaching Award was presented to Dr. Scott Odell, D’82, an instructor in the department of oral medicine. A member of the School’s faculty since 2007, Dr. Odell teaches diagnostic radiology and is chief of emergency care and clinical director of the Medically Complex Clinic. Dr. Odell was previously recognized with the Outstanding Teaching Award in 2012, received the Appleton Award six times and has twice won the Executive Student Council’s Outstanding Service to Students Award.

The Earle Bank Hoyt Award

This award is presented for excellence in teaching to a faculty member who is a Penn Dental Medicine graduate. The award was established by a grateful patient in honor of Dr. Hoyt, a distinguished clinician and educator and member of the Class of 1918. This year’s recipient is Bruce Fisher, D’92, M’97, GD’00, RES’00, a clinical assistant professor of oral and maxillofacial surgery. Dr. Fisher has served on the faculty since 2009. During his tenure, he also held the post of director of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinic at Penn Dental Medicine.

Supporting Penn Vet Initiatives to Provide Care for Shelter Dogs with Cancer and Subsidize Cancer Treatments

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With generous grants from the Petco Foundation and Blue Buffalo Foundation, Penn Vet will advance its Shelter Canine Mammary Tumor Program and launch a cancer treatment support fund at Ryan Hospital for owners who cannot otherwise afford the full cost of cancer treatment for their pets. The announcement coincides with Pet Cancer Awareness Month in May.

“Penn Vet’s remarkable frontline research efforts and treatment options are helping to change the way we approach cancer in both animals and humans,” said Susanne Kogut, executive director of the Petco Foundation. “Through these investments, we are proud to support efforts that will help countless pets and families impacted by this disease.”

“Through our partnership with the Petco Foundation, we’re thrilled to support outstanding pet cancer research and treatment initiatives at work across the country,” said David Petrie, president of the Blue Buffalo Foundation. “The inspiring work taking place at Penn Vet exemplifies the critical role that universities and research centers play in understanding and eradicating pet cancer.”

Helping Shelter Dogs with Mammary Tumors and Women with Breast Cancer

Since 2009, Penn Vet’s Shelter Canine Mammary Tumor Program has provided care for shelter dogs with mammary tumors while advancing knowledge of both canine and human breast cancer. Founded and led by Karin Sorenmo, a professor of oncology, the program aids homeless dogs without access to the care they need to survive. The program covers surgery and follow-up care costs and helps facilitate adoption. 

Shelter dogs provide an ideal population for studying mammary tumors because only 10 percent of animals received into shelters have been spayed or neutered. The incidence of mammary tumors in unspayed female dogs is at least four times greater than in spayed dogs.

Mammary tumors in dogs and breast cancer in women have many similarities, both in terms of risk factors and biology. Many of the dogs in Penn Vet’s program have multiple tumors, often in different stages of malignant transformation, providing a unique opportunity to research cancer progression.

The two-year, $525,000 grant from the Petco Foundation and Blue Buffalo Foundation will enable Dr. Sorenmo to continue her work in improving understanding of how cancer develops and finding better and more efficient drugs to treat and prevent cancer in both dogs and humans.

“Thanks to this very generous support, we can elucidate the complex biology of breast cancer while at the same time saving the lives of some of the most vulnerable members of animal shelter populations,” said Dr. Sorenmo. “It truly is a win-win situation.”

Helping Pets with Cancer Whose Owners Cannot Afford Care

Cancer is a diverse and complex disease with a wide range of clinical outcomes. Treatments can include chemotherapy, surgery, radiation therapy and supportive care. Many patients require a combination of these treatments. In addition to navigating these options, clients also face significant financial considerations. Thanks to the three-year, $350,000 grant, Penn Vet’s Ryan Hospital will launch the “Petco Foundation & Blue Buffalo Foundation Cancer Treatment Support Fund” to provide financial assistance to pet owners who cannot afford cancer treatments.

“As a veterinarian who is trained to deliver the best in compassionate care, it is profoundly difficult, on both a professional and personal level, to experience the grief of a pet owner who has to euthanize a pet because the treatment is unaffordable,” said Erika Krick, assistant professor of oncology. “Thanks to this generous grant, these emotionally overwhelming and devastating experiences can now be transformed into moments of hope.”

Owners will now have access to top cancer experts and treatments at Ryan Hospital. The fund will cover initial treatment costs for cats and dogs needing recommended, standard-of-care, urgent cancer treatment. The pets must be in otherwise adequate health and be expected to have a good quality of life following treatment. Additional parameters may apply.

FY17 Parking Rates

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Penn’s Parking Services would like to thank its valued permit holders for their patronage at the University’s parking facilities. As part of its ongoing commitment to invest in its campus lots and garages, Parking Services made significant facility improvements this past year. These enhancements focused on general maintenance, safety and security upgrades, and improving ingress and egress at lots and garages around campus. Some of the improvements included resurfacing, resealing and restriping several lots; adding a second exit lane to improve egress in one heavily trafficked garage; completing major renovations in two garages; installing a number of additional payment kiosks; and adding security cameras and upgrading lighting. In the coming year, Parking Services will continue to identify ways to continue these investments in support of your parking experience.

Effective July 1, 2016, these  FY17 rates apply to faculty and staff of the University and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. These rate changes will be implemented in the July payroll.

For more information:

Please contact Penn Parking Services if you have questions or would like additional information. You may do so by visiting www.upenn.edu/parking, emailing parking@upenn.edu or visiting the Penn Transportation and Parking Office, Suite 447A, 3401 Walnut Street. Business hours are Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Deaths

Nancy Dougherty, Patient Financial Services

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Nancy Dougherty, a retired managing director of patient financial services at Penn Medicine, died at home of lung cancer on May 18. She was 58 years old.

Ms. Dougherty graduated from John Bartram High School in Philadelphia. She worked in accounts payable at the Southwest Globe Times, a community newspaper in Philadelphia, before coming to Penn in 1980. She worked in financial counseling at Penn Medicine for 34 years, helping patients with insurance and facilitating admission to the hospital.

She joined the board of the University of Pennsylvania Federal Credit Union in 2011 and continued her service until the time of her death.

Ms. Dougherty retired from Penn in 2014 and moved from Clementon, New Jersey, to North Wildwood, New Jersey.

In May of 2015, she was diagnosed with lung cancer, according to her sister, Kathleen Dougherty, a managing director of patient accounting at Penn Medicine.

In addition to her sister, Kathleen, Ms. Dougherty is survived by another sister, Tricia Ware, a director of information technology at Penn Medicine; her mother, Rita; three brothers; one brother-in-law; nieces and nephews; and Scott Nolan.

Donations in her memory may be sent to Lockbox 1352, P.O. Box 8500, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19178-1352.

Condolences may be offered to the family at http://www.egizifuneral.com

David M. Silfen Memorial Celebration: June 17

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On Friday, June 17, at 1 p.m. in College Hall 200, there will be a memorial celebration for David M. Silfen, C'66, vice chair of Penn's Board of Trustees and chairman of the School of Arts & Sciences' Board of Overseers, who died on November 28. He was 69 years old (Almanac December 8, 2015).

Governance

From the Senate Office: SEC Actions

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The following is published in accordance with the Faculty Senate Rules. Among other purposes, the publication of SEC actions is intended to stimulate discussion among the constituencies and their representatives. Please communicate your comments to Patrick Walsh, executive assistant to the Senate Office, either by telephone at (215) 898-6943 or by email at senate@pobox.upenn.edu

Faculty Senate Executive Committee Actions

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Chair’s Report. Faculty Senate Chair Reed Pyeritz reported that the first cadre of Faculty Wellness Ambassadors completed a training session the week prior and will begin serving their roles in the fall. The Office of the Vice Provost for Education is coordinating the training sessions and implementation of this pilot program across the four undergraduate schools. He encouraged SEC members to volunteer to receive the training and serve as Ambassadors. After the first year, the program will be assessed for its effectiveness and may be expanded to include the other eight Penn schools. Dr. Pyeritz noted that the launch of the program is a major accomplishment for SEC this year and offered credit to Claire Finkelstein who led during the initiative’s formative stage. Dr. Pyeritz requested that next year SEC consider a number of other issues, including an examination of the roles and sizes of the Standing Faculty, the Associated Faculty and Academic Support Staff.

Past Chair’s Report. Faculty Senate Past Chair Claire Finkelstein reported that the Campaign for Community (C4C) Steering Committee met on May 10 and that C4C will continue for the 2016-2017 year. She encouraged SEC members to plan events related to open expression, difficult conversations, and diversity and inclusion in the coming year and submit applications for grant funding. She especially encouraged SEC members to consider planning events that involve multiple gatherings about difficult issues that might be confronted in departments or schools. The events do not need to be student-based or involve large numbers of participants, but they do need to maintain the spirit of C4C by providing opportunities to open dialogue and conversation on the campus. She further reported that the Provost’s Academic Planning and Budget Committee and Capital Council have met. She expressed gratitude to the Tri-Chairs with whom she served and to Paulo Arratia for his leadership in developing the Faculty Ambassador Program proposal; she also encouraged SEC members to become future Ambassadors.

Senate Committee Reports. SEC heard and briefly discussed annual reports given by the chairs of Senate Committees. Senate committee reports can be found in the supplement to the May 10, 2016 issue of Almanac.

Confidentiality and the Ombuds. Lynn Hollen Lees, professor of history emerita and University ombudsman, and Marcia Martínez-Helfman, associate ombudsman, discussed issues of sexual misconduct and the confidentiality that their office affords to those who come to them to discuss these matters. Dr. Lees noted that with the promulgation of “Procedures for Resolving Complaints Against Faculty of Sexual Assault, Sexual Violence, Relationship Violence and Stalking,” which took effect March 1, 2016, the Office of the Ombudsman was designated a “confidential resource.”  This designation enables Ombuds staff to refrain from disclosing incidents of sexual misconduct unless the reporting individual gives them permission to do so, with the sole exception of cases in which there is a reasonable belief of imminent risk of serious harm to someone. Dr. Lees and Ms. Martínez-Helfman also reported that the University has released two additional draft policies relating to sexual misconduct, with a request for comments that must be submitted on or before May 27, 2016. These draft policies are “Sexual Violence, Relationship Violence and Stalking Policy” and “Sexual Harassment Policy.” Dr. Lees shared copies of the Office handout that is provided to each visitor, which speaks to the standards of practice for the Office and follows best practices as articulated by the International Ombudsman Association.

Issues Requiring a Vote. SEC members approved the 2016 Senate Committee on Committees slate as presented. SEC members voted for the faculty representatives on the 2016-2017 University Council Steering Committee.

Passing the Torch. Remarks were given by each of the Faculty Senate Tri-Chairs thanking Claire Finkelstein for her service as Past Chair, thanking Reed Pyeritz for his service as Chair, and welcoming Laura Perna as the 2016-2017 Faculty Senate Chair. Dr. Pyeritz announced that Santosh Venkatesh will serve as Chair-Elect of the Senate for the 2016-2017 year.

Trustees May Meeting Coverage

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On May 12, the University of Pennsylvania Trustees held a meeting of their Executive Committee and Budget & Finance Committee, as Alumni Weekend was about to get underway and Commencement (Almanac May 24, 2016) was coming up right after that.

Penn President Amy Gutmann mentioned some of the year’s highlights: Fulbrights, Goldwaters and other fellowships as well as the President’s Innovation (Almanac April 26, 2016) and Engagement (Almanac March 29, 2016) Prizes for Penn students. She also noted that three women faculty members (Almanac May 24, 2016) were elected to the National Academy of Sciences, calling it a “singular honor.”

Provost Vincent Price singled out the first Coursera prize that went to Al Filreis, who he described as one of the earliest and most imaginative adapters of Coursera (Almanac April 19, 2016).

EVP Craig Carnaroli gave the financial report for the three months ended March 31. For the Consolidated University, there was growth in net assets driven largely by the integration of Lancaster General Health into the UPHS, with total net assets of $14.3 billion increased $804 million, but $695 million below budget due to downturn in financial markets. The Academic component net operating income of $68 million was $8 million above the prior year; revenue of $2.2 billion was $69 million above budget while expenditures were $7 million below budget.  Total contributions totaled $229 million, an increase of $8 million from the prior  year’s first nine months. Year-to-date capital expenditures were $252 million, an increase of $60 million over the same period of the prior year.

Moody’s Investors Service has recently improved Penn’s credit ratings to Aa1 to the highest rating level in Penn’s history.

Penn Med Dean Larry Jameson announced that 140 new physicians were about to graduate from Penn Medicine. Nobel Laureate Michael Brown, C’62, M’66 (Almanac October 22, 1985) would be the PSOM speaker this year.

Dr. Jameson also mentioned that Emily Whitehead, who recently celebrated her 11th birthday and her fourth year being cancer-free thanks to the experimental T-cell therapy pioneered by Carl June and his team (Almanac January 26, 2016) was at the recent celebration in California of the $250 million gift to launch the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy at Penn (Almanac April 19, 2016). Dr. Jameson mentioned that 193 Penn Med physicians were recognized by Philadelphia magazine.

The Trustees approved two resolutions: the first pertains to the design and construction of the Robbins House renovations at 3537 Locust Walk ($9.35 million), the second one is to authorize electronic lock installation in residential buildings on approximately 6,000 doors in Kings Court, English, Mayer, the Quad, DuBois, Stouffer, Harrison, Harnwell and Rodin College Houses ($7.85 million).

Bruce C. Vladeck was appointed to the Penn Medicine Board; Susan B. Dillon to Wistar’s.

Trustees Annual Meeting: June 16-17

These meetings will be held at the Inn at Penn. Registration will be located outside of Woodlands Ballroom.

Thursday, June 16

8:30-10 a.m.

Local, National, & Global Engagement

Committee, Woodlands CD

10:15-11:45 a.m.

Facilities & Campus Planning Committee,

Woodlands AB

1:45-3:15 p.m.

Student Life Committee, Woodlands CD

3:30-5:15 p.m.

Academic Policy Committee, Woodlands CD

Budget & Finance Committee,

Woodlands AB, Inn at Penn

Friday, June 17

11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Stated Meeting of the Trustees, Woodlands

Honors

Abass Alavi: Honorary Doctorate

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caption: Abass AlaviAbass Alavi, professor of radiology and neurology and director of research education in the department of radiology in Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine, received an honorary doctorate from the Medical University of Gdańsk in Poland. Dr. Alavi is a physician-scientist specializing in the field of molecular imaging, most notably in the imaging modality of positron emission tomography (PET) and single emission computed tomography (SPECT).

He was recognized for his contributions to medicine and medical imaging during a ceremony earlier this month in Gdańsk. He has recently applied PET imaging techniques to the investigation of atherosclerosis and he is interested in its potential application to heart disease. This is the sixth honorary degree he has received during the past decade.

Karin Corbett: Ivy League Coach of the Year

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caption: Karin CorbettKarin Corbett, head coach of Penn’s women’s lacrosse team, was named Ivy League Coach of the Year for 2016.

This year, Ms. Corbett guided the Quakers to their ninth Ivy League championship in 10 years. She concluded the regular season with a career record at Penn of 187-97, which equates to a .658 winning percentage. Six of her players were named All-Ivy at the conclusion of the regular season, for a total of 85 in Ms. Corbett’s career with the Quakers. She has also coached five positional Players of the Year since the Ivy League instituted those awards in 2013—more than any other Ivy head coach.

Judith Currano: Vormelker Award

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caption: Judith CurranoJudith Currano, head of Penn’s Chemistry Library, has been selected as the 2016 Rose L. Vormelker Award winner by the Special Libraries Association (SLA) in recognition of “her commitment to advancing the development and knowledge of people from all backgrounds who are engaged in the study of chemistry.”

At Penn, Ms. Currano also teaches a course in chemical information that is required of all first-year doctoral students in chemistry, gives lectures on information resources to students in undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory courses, and is an active member of the Penn Women in Chemistry. Off campus, she has long been offering training to fellow information professionals at the SLA Annual Conference. She will receive the Vormelker Award at the opening session of the 2016 SLA Annual Conference this June in Philadelphia.

HHMI Medical Research Fellows

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Three Penn graduate students have been selected as Medical Research Fellows by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI). Ryan Kiefer and Richard Maduka from the Perelman School of Medicine and Megan Clark from the School of Veterinary Medicine will each spend a year in a laboratory working with a mentor on a biomedical research project. Each Fellow will receive $41,000 in grant support.

Mr. Kiefer, a third-year medical student at the Perelman School of Medicine, will perform basic and translational science research under the mentorship of Terence Gade, an assistant professor of radiology who is part of the Penn Image-Guided Intervention Laboratory. They will study the metabolic stress response of live cancer in an effort to develop a novel imaging paradigm for dormant cancer states that may lead to improved detection and treatment.

Mr. Maduka, also in his third year at the Perelman School of Medicine, will perform basic science research under the mentorship of Celeste Simon, a professor of cell & developmental biology who runs her laboratory within Penn’s Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute. They will work to characterize the role of the HIF1-alpha gene and B lymphocytes in pancreatic cancer, and the mechanism by which these factors promote accelerated oncogenesis.

Ms. Clark, a second-year student at Penn Vet, has pursued immunology research in the lab of Phillip Scott, professor of microbiology & immunology in Penn Vet’s department of pathobiology. Ms. Clark will use a murine model to examine how tissue-resident memory T cells migrate into non-inflamed skin sites and how they are retained in the skin to provide protection against leishmaniasis.

David Issadore: Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Award

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caption: David IssadoreDavid Issadore, an assistant professor in the department of bioengineering with a secondary appointment in electrical & systems engineering, received the 2015 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Award for “Microchip Diagnostic for the Rapid Isolation and Identification of Human Plasma-Derived Exosomes.” He will receive support from the Hartwell Foundation for three years at $100,000 direct cost per year.

Dr. Issadore’s research focuses on microelectronics, microfluidics, nanomaterials and molecular targeting, and their application to medicine. These multidisciplinary skills enable him to explore new technologies that can bring medical diagnostics from expensive, centralized facilities directly to clinical and resource-limited settings.

Carl June and Alain Rook: Clinical Research Achievement Awards

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Carl H. June and Alain H. Rook of the Perelman School of Medicine are among the recipients of the 2016 Clinical Research Achievement Award. They were honored at an awards ceremony last month in Washington, D.C.

Dr. June, the Richard W. Vague Professor in Immunotherapy in the department of pathology & laboratory medicine, was acknowledged for his myeloma research progress, including papers on two different T-cell therapies published in the New England Journal of Medicine and Nature Medicine.

Dr. Rook, a professor of dermatology and director of the Cutaneous Lymphoma Program at Penn Medicine, was acknowledged for his research on resiquimod therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. He planned and served as principal investigator on a study on this topic published in the journal Blood.

Ebbing Lautenbach and Ben Z. Stanger: AAP Members

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Two Penn Medicine physicians, Ebbing Lautenbach, chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases and the Robert Austrian Professor in the department of medicine, and Ben Z. Stanger, an associate professor of medicine and associate investigator in the Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, have been elected to the Association of American Physicians (AAP).

Dr. Lautenbach, also a professor in the department of biostatistics & epidemiology and a senior scholar in the Center for Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics, has focused on the control of bacterial infections in healthcare and community settings. He has recently researched the role of biomarkers to inform the use of antibiotics.

Dr. Stanger and his lab study how cells acquire their specialized features and their ability to adapt to new roles when given exposure to new, different conditions. His work has focused on gastrointestinal cancer and tissue regeneration.

Dorothy Roberts: Two Honors

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caption: Dorothy RobertsDorothy Roberts has been selected to receive the Society of Family Planning Lifetime Achievement Award. She will be honored in November at the 2016 annual meeting, the North American Forum on Family Planning, in Denver, Colorado.

She has also been named to Harvard Law’s Women Inspiring Change list for 2016. The Third Annual Harvard Law International Women’s Day Portrait Exhibit showcases the astounding contributions of women around the world to the areas of law and policy. The honorees were nominated by Harvard Law students, faculty or staff.

Dr. Roberts is the George A. Weiss University Professor of Law & Sociology, the Raymond Pace & Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander Professor of Civil Rights and a professor of Africana studies. She is also the 14th Penn Integrates Knowledge (PIK) Professor and the director of the Program on Race, Science & Society.

Merle J. Slyhoff: AALL Hall of Fame

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Merle J. Slyhoff, collection development librarian at the University of Pennsylvania’s Biddle Law Library, has been named one of four winners of this year’s American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) Hall of Fame Award. This award recognizes AALL members who have made significant, substantial and long-standing contributions to the profession of legal information management. Ms. Slyhoff will be recognized at the 109th AALL Annual Meeting & Conference in Chicago in July.

Soccer Without Borders: 2016 Lipman Family Prize

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The Wharton School named Soccer Without Borders as the winner of the 2016 Barry & Marie Lipman Family Prize, made possible by a multi-million dollar gift by Barry Lipman, W’70, and his wife, Marie, in 2011, and enhanced by an additional gift last year (Almanac September 1, 2015). Chosen from more than 170 applicants, Soccer Without Borders received $250,000 at an award ceremony last month.

Soccer Without Borders, which works in 10 countries on three continents, uses soccer as a vehicle for positive change, providing newcomer refugee, asylee and immigrant youth with a toolkit to overcome obstacles to growth, inclusion and personal success. The organization was co-founded and is led by Mary McVeigh, a former professional soccer player. Many participants have fled severe violence and discrimination, and more than 70% are refugees or have sought asylum in the US.

Class of 2016 Ivy Stone

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The Class of 2016 Ivy Stone (above) was designed by Jesus Perez, C’16, and will be made from Vermont gray granite. The stone will be installed at the southeast corner of 37th Street and Locust Walk.

Student Awards

Senior Honor Awards

*Althea K. Hottel Shield Award: Renata M. O’Donnell, C’16

*Gaylord P. Harnwell Flag Award: Julie M. Bittar, C’16

*David R. Goddard Loving Cup Award: Jane R. Meyer, C’16

*R. Jean Brownlee Skimmer Hat Award: Mahalatchmi Subramaniam, W’16

*Spoon Award: Robert C. Lundquist, C’16

*Bowl Award: Jesus O. Perez, C’16

*Cane Award: Chad R. Payne, W’16

*Spade Award: Sebastian E. Negron-Reichard, C’16, W’16

Leadership Awards

*Association of Alumnae Fathers’ Trophy: Jennifer C. Hebert, C’16

*Class of 1915 Award: Samuel H. Mattis, W’16

*James Howard Weiss Memorial Award: David D. Lai, C’16

*Penn Student Agencies Award: Laura C. Sorice, C’16

*Penn Alumni Student Awards of Merit: Alexis E. Block, E’16; Guthrie M. Gintzler, E’16, W’16; Brad M. Hebert, C’16, W’16; Cheyenne R. Rogers, C’16; Amanda A. Russoniello, W’16

*Sol Feinstone Undergraduate Awards: Roderick M. Cook, C’16; Mabel Oviedo, C’16; Cheyenne R. Rogers, C‘16; Sam Trinh, C’16

James Brister Society Student Leadership Award: Nicolas F. Garcia, C’16

Association of Latino Alumni Student Leadership Award: Diana C. Cabrera, C’16

Association of Native Alumni Student Leadership Award: Danielle M. Tiger, C’16

Black Alumni Society Student Leadership Award: Adebisi A. Ogunrinde, C’16, W’16

University of Pennsylvania Asian Alumni Network Student Leadership Award: Jin S. Kim, C’16

Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Alumni Association Student Leadership Award: Roderick M. Cook, C’16

Trustees’ Council of Penn Women Leadership Award: Megan C.Yan, C’16, W’17

William A. Levi Kite & Key Society Award for Service and Scholarship: Brad M. Hebert, C’16, W’16

Note: Awards marked with an asterisk (*) were presented during the Ivy Day ceremony on May 14. The other awards were presented at different award ceremonies this semester.

Penn Prize for Excellence in Teaching by Graduate Students

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caption: Penn Prize for Excellence in Teaching by Graduate Students 2016 recipients.

Earlier this month, ten Penn students received the Penn Prize for Excellence in Teaching by Graduate Students, which recognizes the profound impact of graduate students on undergraduate education at Penn. Nominations for this annual prize come directly from undergraduates.

The 2016 recipients are:

Richard Eisenberg, computer & information sciences

Ambar La Forgia, health care management & economics

Andrea Lloyd, Romance languages

Marcus Michelen, mathematics

Paul Mitchell, anthropology

Stan Najmr, chemistry

Kaitlin Kylie Pomerantz, fine arts

Lindsey Reuben, Romance languages

Rachel Stonecipher, communication

Sarah Wolf, chemistry

Features

Annual International Children’s Festival at Annenberg Center: June 2-4

  • May 31, 2016
  • vol 62 issue 36
  • Features
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The 2016 Philadelphia International Children’s Festival will take place at the Annenberg Center on June 2-4, 2016 with circus, theatre, story-telling and music performances for the whole family. Plus, enjoy the free outdoor Fun Zone with crafts, activities and performances. The Children’s Festival Fun Pass is good for a full day of fun on Saturday, June 4. Enjoy three shows, the Fun Zone and a free lunch for only $25. It’s the best way to experience the Children’s Festival.

At the Fun Zone on the Outdoor Plaza, enjoy a host of engaging and hands-on activities for the whole family. Perfect for families and school groups, the Fun Zone offers face painting and crafts as well as a full schedule of performances. The Fun Zone will be open 9 a.m.-1 p.m. on weekdays and 9 a.m.-3 p.m. on Saturday.

For tickets, see http://www.annenbergcenter.org/

Philadelphia’s youth have a lot to say. Their eloquent and profound voices take center stage with the Teen Voices of the City Ensemble, or T-VOCE. Celebrate today’s young people as they come together for an evening of choral music, spoken word and dance focusing on the impact of community and family. Art Sanctuary, Opera Philadelphia and Annenberg Center Live partnered to create T-VOCE, an ensemble that provides music education and performance opportunities for students whose high schools lack music programs. Come be inspired by the words, thoughts and talents of Philly youth.

Recommended for ages 13+. Thursday, June 2, 7 p.m.

Stories and Songs Charlotte Blake Alston

Tell me a story! For centuries, many cultures used stories to pass down beliefs, myths, history and values to generations. Master storyteller and host of the Philadelphia Orchestra’s preschool concert series, Charlotte Blake Alston captivates audiences with stories and songs from the African and African-American oral traditions.

Recommended for all ages.

Thursday, June 2, 10 a.m. and noon

Friday, June 3, 10 a.m.

Saturday, June 4, 11:15 a.m. and 1:45 p.m.

Playing By Air

Back by popular demand, the beloved troupe Playing By Air returns with its unique blend of music, comedy, juggling and circus. These award-winning performers captivate audiences with their high-energy and breathtaking feats. Playing By Air’s infectious spirit of fun, humor and creativity inspires and encourages playfulness in us all. Recommended for all ages.

Thursday, June 2, 10 a.m. and noon·

Friday, June 3, 10 a.m. and noon

Saturday, June 4, 12:30 p.m.

Catch Me! (Attrape-moi)

Watch as Flip FabriQue, the new cool kids on the circus scene, flip, jump, spin and soar. Fun, fast-paced and fearless, these acrobats take athleticism and showmanship to new heights. From bouncing off balance beams to scaling a trampoline wall, Catch Me! features daring stunts in a cirque sensation that’s a treat for adults and children alike. Recommended for ages 6+.

Thursday, June 2, noon

Friday, June 3, noon

Saturday, June 4, 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.

The Girl Who Forgot to Sing Badly

by Finegan Kruckemeyer

Peggy O’Hegarty and her parents are packers who squeeze foxes into boxes and bikes into brown paper bags. In this fun-filled one-man show, ingenious Irish actor Louis Lovett takes the audience on an adventure through snowy lands and wild seas after Peggy discovers everyone in her city is gone. As she desperately tries to save the day, we learn about love, loss, the reassurance of goats and the courage to sing gloriously on or off-key. Recommended for ages 7+.

The U.S. tour of The Girl Who Forgot to Sing Badly is supported by Culture Ireland. This production was originally commissioned by The Ark, A Cultural Centre for Children, Ireland and produced by The Ark in association with Theatre Lovett.

Thursday, June 2, 10 a.m. and noon

Friday, June 3, 10 a.m. and noon

Saturday, June 4, 11:15 a.m. and 1:45 p.m.

AT PENN

Events

Penn Museum’s “Navajo Film Themselves” on June 11

  • May 31, 2016
  • vol 62 issue 36
  • Events
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In 1966, Annenberg School for Communication Professor Sol Worth collaborated with anthropologist John Adair and Penn graduate student Richard Chalfen on a project in Pine Springs, Arizona to create an experimental set of films made by Navajo people. Out of that research project came a series of seven Navajo-produced films, collectively known as “Navajo Film Themselves,” as well as a now classic book by Professors Worth and Adair, Through Navajo Eyes.

The 50th Anniversary of “Navajo Film Themselves,” a special film program at the Penn Museum on Saturday, June 11, from 5-7 p.m. in the Museum’s Rainey Auditorium, will take a fresh look at the groundbreaking project, its history and its legacy half a century later. The evening will feature the premiere of a 1966 introduction to the project, created by Richard Chalfen, featuring new audio and archival photographs as well as original footage of the Navajo filmmakers at work. The program also will also include a rare local screening of one of the original films, A Navajo Silversmith by John Nelson. Following the screenings there will be a Q & A period. For more information, visit: www.penn.museum/

Human Resources: Upcoming July & August Programs

  • May 31, 2016
  • vol 62 issue 36
  • Events
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Professional and Personal Development

Improve your skills and get ahead in your career by taking advantage of the many development opportunities provided by Human Resources. You can register for programs by visiting knowledgelink.upenn.edu or contacting Learning and Education at (215) 898-3400.

Resumes Brown Bag; 7/19; 12:30-1:30 p.m. Resumes and cover letters are your tools to market yourself for your next position. Do you wonder how to create an effective, dynamic resume? Workshop topics will include effective resume styles and format. We’ll discuss how to focus on the employer’s needs instead of your own, how to use powerful assertions, how to inspire and excite the employer and buzzwords to include to catch the employer’s attention.

SMART Goals Brown Bag; 7/21; 12:30-1:30 p.m. SMART is a handy acronym for the five characteristics of well-designed goals: Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant and Time-bound. It’s a simple tool used to go beyond the realm of fuzzy goal-setting into an actionable plan for results. Put yourself on the fast track to success by applying the SMART principles to every project or goal on your plate!

STEP UP: Introduction; 8/2; 9 a.m.-noon; $150 for 7-session program. STEP UP is Penn’s own unique pre-supervisory training program designed for those who are ready to make the move from staff member to first-line manager. Across seven half-day classroom sessions and seven online modules, you’ll build a foundation of skills, tools and information that will help you excel in your career. Note: While the completion of STEP UP doesn’t guarantee a promotion to a supervisory role at Penn, it will give you the skills you need to take your career to the next level.

Accountability That Works Brown Bag; 8/2; 12:30-1:30 p.m. Take charge of your actions and efforts to become more effective and promote better relationships throughout Penn. Join us for an engaging video and discussion that focuses on three basic concepts that make up the accountability model: responsibility, empowerment and accountability.

How to Make Yourself Indispensable; 8/23; 12:30-1:30 p.m. To be indispensable, employees need to be better than great. They need to perform with a mindset that drives them to think, act and behave differently. In this brown bag, learn how to take ownership of your responsibilities and results, take initiative to go above and beyond what is expected of you, expand your sphere of influence, perform well under pressure, adapt to changing situations, be someone others want to work with, help others improve their performance and avoid being “irreplaceable”—locked into your role and unwilling to share your knowledge.

Quality of Worklife Workshops

Dealing with the demands of work and your personal life can be challenging. These free workshops, sponsored by Human Resources and led by experts from Penn’s Employee Assistance Program and Quality of Worklife Department, offer information and support for your personal and professional life challenges. For complete details and to register, visit www.hr.upenn.edu/myhr/registration or contact Human Resources at (215) 573-2471 or qowl@hr.upenn.edu

Guided Meditation—Take a Breath and Relax; 7/7, 717, 7/28, 8/11 & 8/23; 12:30-1:30 p.m. Practice mindful breathing that focuses your attention on the present moment with kindness, compassion and awareness. Self-massage and gentle mindful movements that promote relaxation and reduce stress may also be included in the one-hour workshop. No experience necessary.

The Power of Positive Thinking; 7/11; 12:30-1:30 p.m. Positive thinking is more than being happy. Positive thoughts can help with handling stress at home and at work in a more constructive way. This session will provide steps and advice to identify and overcome negative thinking and focus on positive thinking.

Time Management; 8/10; 12:30-1:30 p.m. Each of us makes major decisions and reacts to important situations based on our perceptions of time and its value to us. This session will guide you through the hallmarks of quality time management, which include the ability to set reasonable time expectations and conservation strategies, knowledge of personal time perception strengths and weaknesses, sensitivity to time constraints and the ability to evaluate current goals based on them, and respect for your own time and valuing the time of others.

—Division of Human Resources

Crimes

Weekly Crime Reports

  • May 31, 2016
  • vol 62 issue 36
  • Crimes
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The University of Pennsylvania Police Department Community Crime Report

About the Crime Report: Below are all Crimes Against Persons or Crimes Against Society from the campus report for May 16-22, 2016. Also reported were 10 Crimes Against Property (5 thefts, 2 frauds, 1 auto theft, 1 other offense and 1 case of vandalism). Full reports are available at: www.upenn.edu/almanac/volumes/v62/n36/creport.html Prior weeks’ reports are also online. —Eds.

This summary is prepared by the Division of Public Safety and includes all criminal incidents reported and made known to the University Police Department between the dates of May 16-22, 2016. The University Police actively patrol from Market Street to Baltimore Avenue and from the Schuylkill River to 43rd Street in conjunction with the Philadelphia Police. In this effort to provide you with a thorough and accurate report on public safety concerns, we hope that your increased awareness will lessen the opportunity for crime. For any concerns or suggestions regarding this report, please call the Division of Public Safety at (215) 898-4482.

05/20/16    11:39 AM    3929 Sansom St    Complainant struck in face

18th District Report

Below are the Crimes Against Persons from the 18th District: 11 incidents with 2 arrests (5 robberies, 4 assaults and 2 domestic assaults) were reported between May 16-22, 2016 by the 18th District covering the Schuylkill River to 49th Street & Market Street to Woodland Avenue.

05/16/16    6:16 PM    4539 Sansom St    Domestic Assault/Arrest

05/17/16    12:50 AM    3401 Civic Center Blvd    Assault

05/18/16    1:58 PM    500 S 48th St    Robbery (3 complainants)/Arrest

05/18/16    10:02 PM    4600 Spruce St    Robbery

05/18/16    10:08 PM    4400 Sansom St    Assault

05/18/16    10:26 PM    400 S 46th St    Assault

05/19/16    5:56 AM    4432 Ludlow St    Robbery

05/19/16    3:34 PM    237 S 49th St    Domestic Assault

05/20/16    1:41 PM    3929 Sansom St    Assault

05/21/16    9:06 PM    217 S 45th St    Robbery

05/22/16    2:08 AM    4522 Osage Ave    Robbery

Bulletins

Lynda.com: Now Available to All Penn Faculty and Staff

  • May 31, 2016
  • vol 62 issue 36
  • Bulletins
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Information Systems & Computing is pleased to announce that Penn has entered into a new, expanded agreement with Lynda.com, an online video training service that provides instructional videos covering a wide range of software products, technologies and business topics. The new agreement now includes all Penn full-time and part-time faculty and staff. 

With hundreds of course offerings and new courses added weekly, Lynda.com provides a convenient learning experience. Courses are designed for all learning levels and are often presented in three- to five-minute segments, playlists make it easy to manage and customize your Lynda.com experience and bookmarks allow easy reference to favorite course sections. Access to Lynda.com is available 24/7 from your desktop or mobile device, allowing you to learn at your own pace and schedule.

Whether you’re looking to brush up on existing skills, learn new skills or explore what’s up and coming, ISC invites you to include Lynda.com as part of your professional development. To access Lynda.com at Penn, go to http://lynda.upenn.edu and authenticate via your PennKey and password.

For more information, visit Penn’s Lynda.com service at https://www.isc.upenn.edu/lyndacom

Changes: Penn Travel Services

  • May 31, 2016
  • vol 62 issue 36
  • Bulletins
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Penn Purchasing Services and Penn Travel Services are pleased to announce that after the completion of a collaborative request for proposal process that brought together representatives from various Schools and Centers, the University has renewed its contract with World Travel. The competitive bidding effort has resulted in several new changes in the travel management company’s contract with Penn, including significantly reduced fees for booking travel, enhanced automation for ticketing, inclusion of an international specialist on World Travel’s agent team, and the company’s commitment to service level requirements that meet and exceed Penn’s standards for excellence.

To learn more about the savings University departments will experience along with the travel assistance that World Travel offers Penn travelers, contact travel@upenn.edu