News

Gift to Endow Andrea Mitchell Center for the Study of Democracy at Penn

  • August 29, 2017
  • vol 64 issue 2
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Andrea Mitchell

Andrea Mitchell

NBC News correspondent Andrea Mitchell, CW’67, and her husband, economist Alan Greenspan, have made a gift to endow the Andrea Mitchell Center for the Study of Democracy. The Andrea Mitchell Center will provide an unparalleled platform for students, faculty, and a broad public audience to explore some of society’s most pressing concerns and enhance Penn’s stature as a hub for scholarship on democratic institutions and issues. 

Penn President Amy Gutmann said, “Andrea and Alan share the University of Pennsylvania’s commitment to the essential role of path-breaking scholarship along with robust, reasoned and evidence-based dialogue in a democratic society. The Andrea Mitchell Center will engage students and faculty across disciplines in such essential research and dialogue. It also will be a premier public forum for reasoned discourse about democracy. We are all extraordinarily grateful for their exemplary generosity and abiding commitment to the study of democracy and to Penn.”

The Andrea Mitchell Center will build on the work of the Penn Program on Democracy, Citizenship and Constitutionalism, an initiative established with Mellon Foundation support in 2006. The Center’s leadership is changing as well, with Jeffrey Green, associate professor of political science, taking over from founding director Rogers Smith, Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Political Science and associate dean for the social sciences. “Rogers has fostered exploration of democracy on the global scale and encouraged scholarly collaboration across Penn,” said Steven J. Fluharty, dean of Arts and Sciences. “Jeffrey and the Andrea Mitchell Center will continue that work, allowing our faculty to engage in meaningful scholarship and invite student participation in vitally important conversations.”

“Penn has a unique capacity to promote democratic discourse about civic life,” said Ms. Mitchell. “The University’s home in Philadelphia, with its heritage of constitutionalism, combined with Penn’s academic resources, creates the perfect environment to consider complex experiences of citizenship and nationhood. Thoughtful inquiry is deeply important to me personally, and I believe it is of the utmost importance for our nation and, indeed, for all democratic nations. I am grateful that Penn is offering us this opportunity and that my husband and I are able to help make the Center a reality.”

The Andrea Mitchell Center will support academic and public programs organized around yearly themes. The opening event, Religious Freedom in Trouble? An Interfaith Discussion will be on September 28 at the National Constitution Center. The programs will engage students and postdoctoral fellows. Workshop and conference materials will be captured in a book series published in conjunction with the Penn Press.

Ms. Mitchell is the chief foreign affairs correspondent for NBC. She studied English at Penn, where she served as program director at WXPN. She began her professional broadcast career in Philadelphia at KYW Newsradio and she has been a correspondent for NBC since 1978. She is the chair of the Penn Arts and Sciences Board of Overseers and is a University Trustee Emerita. She also is a former chair of the Annenberg School for Communication Advisory Committee and is a member emerita of the Trustees’ Council of Penn Women.

Previous gifts from Ms. Mitchell and Mr. Greenspan have endowed two PIK professorships. She also supports the Kelly Writers House and the Music Department Performance Fund.

Kenneth J. Weiss: The Inaugural Robert L. Sadoff Clinical Professor in Forensic Psychiatry

  • August 29, 2017
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Kenneth Weiss

Kenneth Weiss

The Perelman School of Medicine celebrated the establishment of the newly endowed Robert L. Sadoff Clinical Professorship in Forensic Psychiatry, created in honor of the late Dr. Sadoff. It was a fitting honor that its first chairholder is one of his mentees, Kenneth J. Weiss.

“Dr. Weiss is a talented and dedicated member of the faculty who shares Dr. Sadoff’s passion for educating the future leaders in psychiatry,” said Caryn Lerman, John H. Glick, M.D. Professor in Cancer Research in the department of psychiatry. Department chair Maria Oquendo, Ruth Meltzer Professor of Psychiatry, said, “I look forward to seeing Dr. Weiss’ positive impact on the department in this new role.” Joan Sadoff, the late doctor’s wife, spoke at the reception.

Dr. Weiss has been a Penn psychiatry clinical faculty member since 2010, a clinical professor since 2013 and is the associate director of the Forensic Psychiatry Fellowship Program. Previously at Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Jefferson University and Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, he completed an internship at Philadelphia General Hospital and an apprenticeship with Dr. Sadoff.

Dr. Weiss is an APA Distinguished Life Fellow and recent president of the Philadelphia Psychiatric Society. He has authored numerous publications, and co-edited, with Dr. Clarence Watson, Psychiatric Expert Testimony: Emerging Applications. He has been honored by numerous teaching awards, including the Irma Bland Teaching Award of the American Psychiatric Association and the Golden Apple Award from the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law (AAPL).

Made possible by the generosity of an anonymous donor, the Sadoff Clinical Professorship celebrates Dr. Sadoff’s legacy as one of the founders of the specialty. While pursuing his medical degree, Dr. Sadoff was drawn to the emerging field of forensic psychiatry. Adding legal courses and experience in criminal courts to his training, he was welcomed into the AAPL in 1969. As its second president, he advanced it as the leading association supporting the professional development of forensic psychiatrists. He joined Penn’s faculty in 1972, and though he contributed to hundreds of scholarly articles and worked to serve the intersection of the medical and legal communities for many years, he always considered his role as a teacher and mentor his most important.

Katherine Milkman:  Evan C Thompson Professor

  • August 29, 2017
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Katherine Milkman

Katherine Milkman

Provost Wendell Pritchett and Vice Provost for Education Beth Winkelstein announced the appointment of Katherine L. Milkman to the Evan C Thompson Term Chair for Excellence in Teaching, effective July 1. 

Dr. Milkman is associate professor of operations, information and decisions in the Wharton School and co-director of Wharton People Analytics. Her research uses big data methodologies primarily to study how people systematically deviate from making optimal choices and how to improve decision-making in such areas as diet, exercise and saving for retirement. She has also used data approaches to study race and gender discrimination, what kind of stories are published in The New Yorker, and what makes science and The New York Times articles widely shared.

The winner of numerous Wharton teaching awards, she has taught at Wharton since 2009, received an Early Career Impact Award from the Federation of Associations in Behavioral and Brain Sciences, and was named one of the world’s leading business school professors under 40 by Poets and Quants. Her work has been widely cited in such media as The New York Times, Forbes, Huffington Post, Harvard Business Review and National Public Radio and published in such leading academic journals as Management Science, The Journal of Finance and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 

She earned a PhD in 2009 from Harvard in computer science and business and a BSE summa cum laude in 2004 in operations research and financial engineering from Princeton.

Evan C Thompson, W’64, endowed the Thompson Professorship in 2003 to recognize teaching excellence. Previous Evan C Thompson Professors include Peter Struck, now professor of classical studies in SAS; Daniel Lee, now UPS Foundation Professor in SEAS; and Dennis DeTurck, now Fox Leadership Professor and professor of mathematics in SAS.

Mark Dingfield: Associate Provost for Finance and Planning

  • August 29, 2017
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Mark Dingfield

Mark Dingfield

Provost Wendell Pritchett announced the appointment of Mark Dingfield as Associate Provost for Finance and Planning, effective September 5.

Dr. Dingfield has been executive director for planning, analysis and technology at Princeton University, where he has worked since 2010. He oversaw the planning, administration and budgetary operations of the Office of Finance and Treasury and worked closely with the Provost, EVP, trustees and deans on strategic planning to support academic and administrative priorities. His experience at Princeton included leading “Princeton Prime,” a multi-year strategic initiative to redesign and modernize the university’s financial processes and infrastructure, and leading financial planning and analysis for Princeton’s strategic plan.

“Mark brings to us a remarkable combination of skills, spanning financial administration, academic research and strategic planning,” said Provost Pritchett. “This background gives him a deep understanding of the range of initiatives at Penn. I am confident that he will bring great insight and energy to our work across the University.” 

Dr. Dingfield earned a BA in political science in 2001, with concentrations in public policy and German studies, from Swarthmore College, where he was on the Board of Managers from 2004-2009. He earned an MSc with distinction in 2003 in European public policy from the London School of Economics and a PhD in political science in 2016 from Temple University. 

He currently serves on the Board of Directors of Breakthrough of Greater Philadelphia. 

Before Princeton, he worked for six years both in Europe and in the Seattle area, as a senior product manager at Microsoft and a director at Think Act.

Peter Decherney: Faculty Director of the Online Learning Initiative

  • August 29, 2017
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Peter Decherney

Peter Decherney

Provost Wendell Pritchett and Vice Provost for Education Beth Winkelstein are pleased to announce the appointment of Peter Decherney as Faculty Director of the Online Learning Initiative. It was effective July 1.

“Peter has been an energetic and visionary chair of OLI’s faculty advisory group for the past five years,” said Provost Pritchett. “He is not only an expert in new technologies but also a highly successful online teacher. He will be an ideal partner to help us sustain Penn’s place as a leader in innovative teaching and learning around the world.”

Dr. Decherney has taught at Penn since 2004 and is currently professor of cinema studies and English in the School of Arts and Sciences. He is an author or editor of five books, including Hollywood’s Copyright Wars: From Edison to the Internet (Columbia University Press, 2012), which established him as a leading expert on media law and policy. In this regard, he has testified before the United States Copyright Office and filed amicus briefs in several cases, including the Supreme Court case of Golan v. Holder. He has been an Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Scholar, a fellow of the American Council of Learned Societies, and a State Department Arts Envoy to Myanmar, among numerous other honors. 

The Online Learning Initiative began in 2012, when Penn became one of the founding university partners in Coursera, the pioneering online learning platform. Penn now offers more than 90 courses and eight specializations on Coursera—with 25 million learners around the world in disciplines that encompass all 12 Penn Schools—while expanding to include the non-profit edX platform and a wide range of other new and advanced educational programs. The work of Penn faculty in online learning has also spurred numerous educational innovations on campus, especially through the Structured Active In-Class Learning Initiative. 

Orphan Disease Center Funding Opportunity: September 18

  • August 29, 2017
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The Orphan Disease Center (ODC) at the University of Pennsylvania announces the 2017 Million Dollar Bike Ride Pilot Grant Program. The program is offering 33 different research grant opportunities focusing on 23 different rare diseases. It provides a one-year grant to support research related to a rare disease represented in the 2017 Million Dollar Bike Ride. Number of awards and dollar amounts vary per disease based on fundraising totals by each disease team. This RFA is open to the international community. All individuals holding a faculty-level appointment at an academic institution or a senior scientific position at a non-profit institution or foundation are eligible to respond to this RFA. For more details about this grant program, rare disease focus areas, and how to apply, please visit the ODC website. Letters of Interest (LOIs) are due no later than Monday, September 18, 2017 by 8 p.m. Refer to the ODC website for instructions on submission. 

Contact Samantha Charleston at scharle@upenn.edu, or (215) 573-6822 with any questions.

Nancy Hodgson: Nursing’s Hillman Scholars Program

  • August 29, 2017
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Nancy Hodgson

Nancy Hodgson

Nancy A. Hodgson, the Anthony Buividas Term Chair in Gerontology and associate professor of nursing, assumed the role of director of the Penn School of Nursing’s Hillman Scholars Program in Nursing Innovation on July 1. The Hillman Scholars Program, funded by the Rita and Alex Hillman Foundation (RAHF) and launched in 2011, was established to educate a new cadre of nurse scientists and leaders to develop innovative solutions in health care. This unique program, takes students from the BSN to PhD simultaneously.

“We are excited to have Dr. Nancy Hodgson, a nationally-recognized nurse researcher, as the program’s next leader. Her academic experience and breadth of research make her an excellent choice for the position,” said Ahrin Mishan, executive director of the RAHF.

Dr. Hodgson has more than 20 years of experience in geriatric nursing education and aging research, and a long-term commitment to designing and testing intervention strategies to improve the quality of life for chronically ill older adults and their caregivers. She has a strong funding and publication record in the field of gerontology, nursing, palliative care and dementia caregiving. She is a Fellow in the American Academy of Nursing and the Gerontological Society of America.

Maureen Reilly: Penn Law Office of Career Planning & Professionalism

  • August 29, 2017
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Maureen Reilly

Maureen Reilly

The University of Pennsylvania Law School has appointed Maureen Reilly, a senior strategic legal advisor to HR and executive leadership teams at the Vanguard Group, one of the world’s largest investment firms, to the position of assistant dean and executive director for Career Services, where she will oversee the Law School’s career services initiatives.

Prior to joining Penn Law, Dr. Reilly was the principal and practice group leader for the Employment & Immigration Services team at Vanguard, where she advised on employment law matters, oversaw immigration law advice and services, and chose and directed outside law firms retained by the company.

“Maureen Reilly is an exceptional lawyer who brings a deep knowledge of what law firms, corporations and organizations are looking for when they hire law school graduates,” said Ted Ruger, dean of the Law School and Bernard G. Segal Professor of Law. “For over 15 years, she has played a key role in selecting and overseeing the lawyers and firms for her corporate clients. That experience will be invaluable in her work with our students as they enter a rapidly changing legal job market.”

Dr. Reilly is a graduate of the University of Virginia School of Law, and she also holds a BS in psychology from Frostburg State University and a PhD in industrial & organizational psychology from George Mason University. Before she joined the Vanguard Group, she served as assistant general counsel for SunGard Data Systems and an associate in the Labor & Employment Practice Group at the law firm Morgan, Lewis & Bockius in Philadelphia.

Penn Law graduates are highly successful in the job market. The Law School was ranked number one in the country in placing its 2016 graduates in full-time, bar passage-required jobs or jobs where a JD was an advantage in employment. Ninety-eight percent of the Law School’s 2016 graduating class was employed, and graduates found rewarding jobs in a variety of fields, including law firms, judicial clerkships, business and finance, public interest and government.

The Office of Career Planning & Professionalism (CP&P) provides students with programs, services, online resources and individual counseling to give them a competitive advantage throughout their careers. Eight career counselors work closely with students and alumni to think strategically and set goals for successful career development.

“I am thrilled to join the Penn Law community,” said Dr. Reilly. “I was drawn to CP&P because of their outstanding work preparing the Law School’s students for their careers. I look forward to continuing that excellence while we evolve and adapt to an ever-changing legal marketplace.”

Report of the Office of Student Conduct

  • August 29, 2017
  • vol 64 issue 2
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To the University Community:
The Offices of Student Conduct and the Sexual Violence Investigative Officer are committed to preparing a report to the University community each summer that includes the nature of violations of University rules and regulations and the sanctions imposed. Once again, we are providing our report to the University community.

—Deborah Harley, Sexual Violence Investigative Officer
—Julie Nettleton, Director, Office of Student Conduct
Incident Type (by respondents)
Academic Year
Academic Year
Academic Year
Academic Year
 
2013-2014
2014-2015
2015-2016
2016-2017
Academic Integrity (total)
160
185
201
227
    Undergraduate
127
151
149
199
    Graduate/Professional
33
34
52
28
Student Conduct (total)
162
177
203
180
    Undergraduate
134
158
175
161
    Graduate/Professional
28
19
28
19
Academic Integrity and Student Conduct (total)
2
1
0
1
    Undergraduate
1
1
0
1
    Graduate/Professional
1
0
0
0
Mediation (participants)
22
26
12
16
Group Cases (Student Organizations/Fraternities/etc.)*
3
4
4
3
TOTAL:
349
393
420
427
*Group Cases include several individuals but are being counted as one respondent.
Case Investigations: Academic Integrity**
Plagiarism
56
77
74
122
Unauthorized collaboration/use of performance of another person’s work
78
67
105
95
Misconduct during an exam
10
3
11
16
Submission of false data
0
6
1
5
Falsification of grades or transcripts
0
0
0
2
Other academic violation
1
5
9
6
Altering of exam/paper for re-grade
5
3
3
6
Misrepresentation of academic records
3
1
0
1
Provided information to another student
7
2
6
2
Cheating
23
26
42
60
Fabrication
3
3
1
1
Multiple submission
1
1
10
0
Facilitating academic dishonesty
25
15
16
23
Unfair advantage over fellow students
7
7
20
12
Case Investigations: Student Conduct**
Alcohol violation: First offense
42
15
12
41
Alcohol violation: Other
2
4
21
21
Assault
19
8
1
3
Attempted theft
3
3
0
0
Burglary
1
1
0
2
Criminal mischief
0
0
0
0
Disorderly conduct
14
36
54
44
Drug violation
15
6
3
7
Fire code violation
3
18
5
1
Forgery
2
2
1
0
Fraud
2
0
3
3
Fraudulent use of Penn ID
0
0
1
0
Harassment
8
2
1
0
Sexual violence***
7
9
7
10
Indecent exposure
1
0
0
4
Malicious mischief
0
0
0
4
Miscellaneous security violations
1
0
0
0
Disturbance/investigation of person
2
0
0
0
Relationship Violence
***
10
4
2
Retail theft/shoplifting
5
1
1
0
Stalking
***
6
3
3
Theft
3
2
0
2
Trespassing
1
2
3
7
Vandalism
2
4
5
31
Other conduct violation
5
2
19
43
Propulsion of object
0
2
0
0
Receiving stolen property
1
0
0
0
Use or possession of fake ID card
0
0
0
9
Recklessly endangering another person
1
0
7
0
Hazing
5
13
3
16
Terroristic threats
1
1
1
6
Ethnic intimidation
0
1
0
0
Incident Type (by respondents)
Academic Year
Academic Year
Academic Year
Academic Year
 
2013-2014
2014-2015
2015-2016
2016-2017
 
 
 
 
 
Use or possession of air guns/firearms/dangerous articles
0
0
0
0
Threats
2
3
1
0
Violation of safety regulations
2
1
7
0
Dangerous articles in residences
0
1
0
0
Noise violation
2
1
6
0
Threats with dangerous article
0
0
1
0
Computer violation/violation of ethical behavior in the digital environment
38
60
92
41
Violation of agreement
2
0
0
0
Misrepresentation of status to the University
1
0
0
1
Sexual harassment
2
0
1
5

**Number of Case Investigations does not equal the number of respondents because some cases involve more than one type of misconduct.

***Sexual Violence, Stalking and Relationship Violence were specifically outlined in the University’s new policy in June 2014 under the now Sexual 

Violence, Relationship Violence and Stalking Policy. Prior handlings of related cases were all categorized under indecent/sexual assault and harassment.

Sanctions: Academic Integrity****
Academic support
14
30
79
79
Apology
1
5
20
4
Counseling
4
2
7
4
Essay
53
58
106
134
Meet with appropriate person related to charge
0
1
0
5
Expulsion
2
2
0
0
Notation on transcript
1
2
1
1
Other (specialized)
1
1
2
3
Probation
32
30
49
49
Reprimand
29
46
41
62
Suspension
5
5
10
3
Suspension not imposed
29
23
28
25
Suspension not imposed and imposed
12
2
4
1
Warning
11
28
28
39
Withdraw permanently from the University
0
2
0
0
Withhold/delay degree
2
4
5
6
Sanctions: Student Conduct****
Alcohol and drug education/evaluation
14
17
9
12
Alcohol/drug fine
17
2
0
0
Apology
5
5
4
3
CAPS substance abuse evaluation
6
2
1
3
Community services
12
11
26
46
Counseling
7
9
8
4
Essay
6
11
23
40
Expulsion
1
0
1
2
File sharing educational module
3
58
92
40
File sharing fine
3
0
0
0
Meet with appropriate person related to charge
0
0
7
1
No contact
1
2
7
2
Notation on transcript
0
1
0
0
Other (specialized)
22
3
9
18
Probation
10
15
14
20
Reprimand
54
17
24
24
Restitution
4
4
5
4
Suspension
1
4
7
5
Suspension not imposed
4
5
1
7
Suspension not imposed and imposed
4
0
0
0
Warning
5
30
11
18
Withdraw permanently from the University
0
1
1
0
Withhold/delay degree
0
0
3
2
Other (Specialized)
22
3
9
18
****Number of Sanctions does not equal the number of respondents because some cases result in more than one type of sanction.
Mode of Resolution of Cases
Signed agreement
128
216
267
279
Resolved by hearing
3
7
7
5
No formal disciplinary action/unfounded complaint or informal resolution
85
39
28
66
Mediation
11
13
12
8
Required educational module (Electronic File sharing ONLY)#
0
58
91
40
Unresolved*****
46
43
15
21

*****Unresolved can mean that a student is no longer a member of the Penn community, that the investigation is on-going, or that a conclusion has been reached but an agreement has not been reached.

# The OSC has created an education-based response to file sharing cases.

Deaths

Roger Abrahams, Folklore and Folklife

  • August 29, 2017
  • vol 64 issue 2
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Roger Abrahams

Roger Abrahams

Roger Abrahams, Gr’61, the Hum Rosen Professor in Folklore and Folk Literature in English Emeritus, died on June 20 at age 84.

Dr. Abrahams earned a bachelor’s degree in English from Swarthmore College in 1955, a master’s degree in literature and folklore from Columbia University in 1959 and a doctorate in literature and folklore from Penn in 1961. His dissertation, “Negro Folklore from South Philadelphia,” led to the creation of a separate department of folklore and folklife at Penn. It also became the book, Deep Down in the Jungle: Negro Narrative Folklore from the Streets of Philadelphia, published in 1964. During his student years, Dr. Abrahams became involved in the New York folk music scene. He sang on the Folkways album Foc’sle Songs and Shanties, released in 1959, and recorded his own album, Make Me a Pallet on Your Floor and Other Folk Songs, released in 1962. He also worked as an editor and writer at the folk music magazine Caravan.

He joined Penn’s department of folklore and folklife in 1985. He was named the Hum Rosen Professor of Folklore and Folk Literature in 1989. He was the inaugural director of the Center for Folklore and Ethnography, which opened in 1999 with the closing of the folklore and folklife department. That year, his home department changed to English. He became professor emeritus in 2002 (Almanac May 7, 2002).

Dr. Abrahams was president of the American Folkore Society in 1979. In 1988 he was awarded AFS’s Centennial Award for Lifetime Scholarly Achievement in 1988 and in 2005, he was awarded its Kenneth S. Goldstein Award for his contributions to strengthening folklore in higher education

Dr. Abrahams is survived by his wife, Janet; his son, Rod; his daughter, Lisa Abrahams; and a sister, Marjorie Slavin.

Pier Luigi Bargellini, Engineering

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Pier Luigi Bargellini, a longtime faculty member in what was then the Moore School of Electrical Engineering at Penn, died on August 4, 2016. He was 102 years old.

A native of Florence, Italy, Dr. Bargellini attended school at the University of Florence and the Polytechnic University of Turin in the 1930s. He married Anna Cioni in 1941 and they were together until her death in 2015.

He worked as an engineer for the Allied Military government and operated a medium wave broadcasting station before earning a master’s degree in electrical engineering at Cornell University. In 1950, he was hired as an instructor at Penn’s Moore School of Electrical Engineering. He became assistant professor in 1951 and associate professor in 1957.

While at Penn, he also served as a consultant on electronics and communications for a number of American and Italian companies including RCA, GE, ItalCable and Alenia Marconi Systems. He left Penn in 1961 and worked for Aerospace Corporation until 1965, whereupon he returned to Penn as associate professor of electrical engineering. He resigned in 1970. He then worked as a senior scientist at Comsat Laboratories in Clarksburg, Maryland.

He was the recipient of two Columbus Gold Medals from the International Institute of Communications in Genoa, Italy. 

After his retirement, he and Anna moved to Tepoztlan, Morelos, Mexico in 2008.

He is survived by his children, Clara Camara (Gabriel), Angela Nielsen (Richard) and Leonard (Leslie Moldow); grandchildren, Lara Nielsen, Anna Nielsen, Gabriela Camara, Carlos Camara (Jenny) and Sylvia; and great-grandson, Lucas.

Lillian Dabney Bryant, Penn Vet

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Lillian Dabney Bryant, a retired long-time head librarian for the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine Library, died on August 8. She was 87.

She was a librarian at Penn Vet from 1981-2001. Prior to working at Penn Vet, Ms. Bryant was a medical librarian for Hahnemann, and at the Tri-NEB library, a combined facility that served three two-year nursing programs: HUP, CHOP and PGH.

She is survived by her husband of 65 years, Winston M. Bryant; her daughter, Robyn Bryant-Farmer; and grandchildren, Liana and Raymond. A memorial service will be held Saturday, September 16, at noon at Mt. Calvary Baptist Church, 127 Walnut Ave., Ardmore, PA. 

Diana Cavallo, English

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Diana Cavallo

Diana Cavallo

Diana Cavallo, CW’53, a writer who taught in the English department at the University of Pennsylvania for 18 years, died on June 17 at age 85.

Ms. Cavallo taught fiction writing in the creative writing program from 1980-1998. She wrote novels and plays, and also wrote and performed monologues. Her play, Two Sisters, won first prize in a contest sponsored by the Ethical Society of Philadelphia. She also wrote the novels A Bridge of Leaves (1961) and Juniper Street Sketches, and the non-fiction book The Lower East Side: A Portrait in Time (1971).

In 1994, she received the Distinguished Service Award from the College of General Studies for her outstanding support of continuing education students (Almanac May 24, 1994).

Before joining Penn, she was a Fulbright Teaching Fellow at the University of Pisa in Italy. She later returned there as a special lecturer and was a featured speaker on classical American writers. She also read from her own work for the United States Information Service at various universities throughout Italy.

She is survived by her nieces, Linda Smythe and Andrea Greger.

Eleanor Dower, Nursing

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Eleanor O. Dower, Nu’56, GEd’59, a longtime faculty member at Penn Nursing, died on May 6 at the age of 94.

Ms. Dower graduated from Catasauqua High School in 1939 and from Allentown Business College in 1942. She worked in the accounting department for the Lehigh Valley Railroad for six years while saving money to attend nursing school. She graduated from the Reading Hospital School of Nursing in 1951 and worked there as supervisor of health services until 1953. She then joined Penn as a part-time nurse while earning her BS in nursing education, which she completed in 1956. She then became an instructor here and assistant to the dean of nursing. While working, she obtained her master’s degree in nursing education in 1959.

She went on to work for Widener University’s School of Nursing for 20 years until her retirement in 1987, when she gained emeritus status.

She was a member of Sigma Theta Tau and Pi Lambda Honor Societies, and was listed in Who’s Who in American Women, Who’s Who in Health Care and Outstanding Educators of America.

She is survived by her sisters, Frances Whipple and Caroline Barrett.

Kenneth George, Education

  • August 29, 2017
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Kenneth D. George, emeritus professor of education at the University of Pennsylvania, died on July 9. He was 83 years old.

Dr. George joined Penn 1965 as assistant professor in the Graduate School of Education. In 1969, he became an associate professor as well as associate dean of the School. In 1974, he became a professor. He took on a secondary appointment as professor of education in psychiatry in 1977.

While at Penn, he served on the Faculty Senate, the Senate Committee on the Economic Status of the Faculty and was chair of the Grievance Committee for the University. He was awarded “Best Teacher of a Doctoral Course” and also received an “Outstanding Professor” award from the Greek system.

He was a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and served as president of the Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality.

He retired and was named emeritus professor of education in 1999.

After his retirement, Dr. George wrote two books, served as a guardian ad litem for the courts in Martin County, Florida and served as board member and president of the Unitarian Universality Congregation in Stuart, Florida.

He is survived by a niece, Patricia Ringo; a grandnephew, Tyler; a longtime friend, Andrew E. Behrendt, and Mr. Behrendt’s daughter, Elizabeth.

David Kuhl, Nuclear Medicine

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David E. Kuhl, M’55, GM’59, a former University of Pennsylvania faculty member for nearly 20 years, died on May 28. He was 87.

Dr. Kuhl was an internationally-known pioneer in positron emission tomography.

He earned a bachelor’s degree from Temple University and then a medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania, where he also completed his residency. He joined Penn’s faculty in 1958 as assistant instructor and resident of medical radiology. He became a professor of radiology in 1970.

In 1976, he left to join the University of California Los Angeles, where he remained until 1986 when he became chief of the division of nuclear medicine at University of Michigan, a position he held for 25 years until his retirement in 2011.

Dr. Kuhl developed a new method of tomographic imaging, as well as several tomographic instruments, early in his career. His techniques were eventually developed into today’s positron emission tomography. His research focused on the use of radioactive tracers and emission reconstruction tomography to develop new measures of neurochemical and metabolic processes within the living brain. The techniques he developed enabled the creation of drugs targeted to the earliest stages of degenerative brain disease.

Dr. Kuhl was a founding member of the Society of Nuclear Medicine.

His is survived by his wife, Eleanor, his son David (Diane) and his grandchildren, Katherine and Jennifer.

Linda Lentine, Penn Dental Medicine

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Linda L. Lentine, a retired employee of Penn Dental Care Center, died on July 5. She was 63.

Ms. Lentine joined Penn in 2000 as an occasional worker and became a clinical receptionist for Penn Dental Care Center that year. In 2004, she became a supervisor there. She retired this year.

She is survived by her children, Ryan and Alyse Rodriguez (Marcus); grandson, Gabriel; brother, James; and sister, Susan Cianfani.

David Maitland, New Bolton Center/Penn Vet

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David J. Maitland, a carpenter who worked at Penn Vet’s New Bolton Center for 36 years, died on July 2. He was 66.

Mr. Maitland graduated from Altoona Area High School in 1968 and attended Williamson Trade School from 1968-70. He joined Penn in 1978 and worked as a carpenter for the rest of his career. He became senior mechanic in 2002. He joined the 25-Year Club in 2003 (Almanac November 4, 2003) and retired in 2005.

He is survived by his wife, Barbara M. Rogers Maitland; his daughter, Erin M. Howell (Tad); two grandchildren, Brianna and Joseph; and three sisters, Eleanor Kraft, Joann Beck and Carol Kinser.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Friends of New Bolton Center, 382 W. Street Road, Kennett Square, PA 19348. 

Thomas Saaty, Wharton

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Thomas L. Saaty, a former professor of statistics and operations research at Wharton, died on August 20. He was 91.

Dr. Saaty, a well-known and recognized mathematician who created the Analytical Hierarchy Process, worked for the federal Arms Control and Disarmament Agency before joining Wharton in 1969 as a professor. While at Penn, he was chairman of the graduate group in operations research and a member of the graduate group in peace research (Almanac April 10, 1970). He briefly held a secondary appointment in decision sciences (Almanac January 23, 1979). He resigned in 1979 and went on to develop groundbreaking theories on strategic decision-making and resource allocation at University of Pittsburgh.

Dr. Saaty is survived by his wife, Rozann and his children, John, Daniel, Michael, Emily Harker and Linda Holker; 10 grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

H. Ralph Schumacher, Medicine

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Ralph Schumacher

Ralph Schumacher

H. Ralph Schumacher Jr., M’59, professor emeritus and former acting chief of rheumatology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and former section chief of rheumatology at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center, died on July 30 from complications of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. He was 84.

Dr. Schumacher earned a bachelor’s degree from Ursinus College and a medical degree at Penn. Between completing various fellowships, he served for two years as a staff physician in the US Air Force in California.

He joined the Penn faculty in 1967 and became a professor of medicine in 1979. He also took on a secondary appointment as professor of comparative medicine in the department of clinical studies at the School of Veterinary Medicine the same year. His research and clinical work focused on synovial fluid, gout and crystal-associated arthritis and diagnostic problems. He served twice as acting chief of rheumatology for the School of Medicine. He was primarily based at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center, where he was section chief of rheumatology from 1967 until 2005. He retired and became professor emeritus of medicine in 2012.

Dr. Schumacher published more than 400 research articles as well as 200 reviews, book chapters and editorials. He was the founding editor-in-chief of the Journal of Clinical Rheumatology.

He is survived by his wife of 54 years, Elizabeth Jean (Swisher); daughters, Heidi Wilson and Kaethe; and three grandchildren. 

Donations in Dr. Schumacher’s memory be made to Penn Medicine’s division of rheumatology at: Penn Rheumatology, 3535 Market St., Suite 750, Philadelphia, PA 19104 to support the Schumacher Rheumatology Research Fund. Donors should mention “Dr. Schumacher” in the correspondence or on the check memo and make checks payable to the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania. Donations can also be made online at http://tinyurl.com/y7vlxccc.

Donald Smith, Political Science

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Donald E. Smith, G’53 Gr’56, emeritus professor of political science at University of Pennsylvania, died on July 6 at the age of 89.

Dr. Smith, who grew up in Berlin, New Jersey, earned a dual bachelor’s degree in arts and theology from Eastern Baptist College and Theological Seminary in 1951 (now Eastern University). While studying at there, he was ordained and preached in Spanish at a small parish in Harlem. 

He completed a master’s degree in political science in 1953, followed by a doctorate in political science in 1956, both at Penn.

Dr. Smith taught at University of Rhode Island for eight years. In 1955, he joined the Penn faculty as an instructor of political science. He became an associate professor in 1964 and then professor in 1973.

He was chair of the committee on academic freedom and responsibility at Penn’s School of Arts & Sciences. He joined the 25-Year Club in 1989 (Almanac October 31, 1989).

Dr. Smith received two Fulbright fellowships for research in India and a grant from the Social Science Research Council for research in Latin America (Almanac May 1968). He was the author of Nehru and Democracy, published in 1958, India as a Secular State in 1963 and Religion and Political Development in 1970. He was the editor and a contributor to South Asian Politics and Religion in 1966 and co-editor and contributor to Anti-Americanism in the Third World in 1985. He was honored by the Association of Indians in America in 1994.

He retired and became emeritus in 1999.

He married Violet Ramanjulu of Nellore, India, in 1975. She died in 1993. He married Deborah Anthony Stuart in 2000. 

He is survived by his wife, Deborah, a sister and extended family.

Johnathan Christian Smith, Mechanical Engineering Student

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Johnathan Christian Smith, a student in the Class of 2019, died on July 27 while undergoing cancer treatment. Mr. Smith, 21, was from Trinidad and Tobago.

Mr. Smith was a mechanical engineering major and a visual artist who was in the Trinidad and Tobago Art Society. The Facebook page for his artwork described him as a “young Trinidadian artist with a knack for black and white chiaroscuro interpretations of Caribbean imagery.”

He lived in Gregory College House.

Mr. Smith was diagnosed with cancer in 2016 after experiencing eye pain. He had been on medical leave from the University while undergoing treatment.

In a statement released by the University, his parents said, “Johnathan always thought about the welfare of others before thinking about himself. His personality attracted many friends whom he considered as his extended family… the siblings he never had.”

He is survived by his parents, Hayden and Anna.

Matthew Stephens, Accounting

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Matthew Stephens

Matthew Stephens

Matthew James Stephens, W’52, WG’59, GrW’64, emeritus associate professor of accounting at the University of Pennsylvania, died on July 14. He was 86.

Dr. Stephens grew up in Drexel Hill and graduated from Upper Darby High School in 1948. He earned a BS in economics in 1952, followed by an MBA in accounting in 1959 and a PhD in finance in 1964, all from Penn’s Wharton School of Business. He also became a certified public accountant (CPA) in 1957.

Between earning his bachelor’s degree and MBA, Dr. Stephens served as a First Lieutenant in the Army during the Korean War, serving in Munich and Paris. He then worked for Arthur Andersen.

He joined Penn in 1956 as an assistant professor of accounting and a lecturer in accounting and finance. He taught in the Wharton School for 45 years. From 1972 to 1985 he also served as Vice Dean and director of the Wharton Undergraduate Division. In 1996, he retired and become emeritus associate professor of accounting.

While at Penn, Dr. Stephens was awarded the Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching (1971), the Outstanding Professor Award-Evening School (1977), the Wharton Activities Council Award of Merit (1979) and the Wharton Distinguished Services Award (1985). He served as chair of the 25-Year Club in 1990-91.

He is survived by his wife, Beryl (Obermann); two children, Matthew and Kathleen; three grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

Samuel Tucker, Pediatrics and Neurology

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Samuel H. Tucker, M’56, GM’60, an emeritus associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine, died on April 7. He was 86.

Dr. Tucker attended Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire and graduated from Princeton University in 1952, before earning his medical degree from University of Pennsylvania in 1956.

He actively served in the US Naval Reserves and retired with the rank of Captain.

He joined the School of Medicine faculty in 1958 as assistant instructor and taught for 20 years. In 1976, he became associate professor of pediatrics with a secondary appointment in neurology. His secondary appointment was continually renewed through 1996. In 1992, he retired and became emeritus associate professor of pediatrics.

He is survived by his wife, Robin; sons, Alden and Robertson, and their mother, Martha; a twin sister, Elizabeth Tucker Ripley; stepdaughters Susan Laquintano, Jacqueline Moses, Crissa Robin Carroll and Ellisa Beth Budnick; a stepson, Matthew Justus; one grandson; and 14 step-grandchildren whom he helped raise.

Albert Winegrad, Endocrinology

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Albert I. Winegrad, C’49, M’52, emeritus professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, died on July 20 at the age of 90.

Dr. Winegrad had been the Ware Professor of Medicine and director of the Cox Institute of Diabetes Research at Penn. He was a past vice president of the American Diabetes Association and winner of the 1986 Banting Medal for his pioneering work in diabetic neuropathy.

He joined Penn in 1957 as an associate instructor of endocrinology in the School of Medicine. In 1960, he became assistant professor and in 1966, he became associate professor. He was named professor of medicine in the Cox Institute in 1970. In 1992, he retired and became emeritus professor of medicine.

He is survived by many nieces, nephews, great-nieces and great-nephews.

Contributions in his memory may be made to the George S. Cox Research Institute, c/o Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania. 

Memorial for Eric Schneider

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The Penn Urban Studies program has announced a memorial for Eric Schneider to be held Saturday, September 9, at 2 p.m. at College Hall, Rm. 200. A reception will follow. Dr. Schneider, assistant dean and associate director for academic affairs in the College and adjunct professor of history in SAS, died on March 22. He was 66 (Almanac April 11, 2017)

Please RSVP to vkarkov@sas.upenn.edu.


To Report a Death

Almanac appreciates being informed of the deaths of current and former faculty and staff members, students and other members of the University community. Call (215) 898-5274 or email almanac@upenn.edu.

However, notices of alumni deaths should be directed to the Alumni Records Office at Room 517, Franklin Building, (215) 898-8136 or email record@ben.dev.upenn.edu.

Esther Lafair, Criminology Center

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Esther Lafair

Esther Lafair

Esther M. Lafair, CGS’76, a retired executive secretary in the Criminology Center of the University of Pennsylvania, died on July 2. She was 86.

Ms. Lafair was a graduate of Overbrook High School. She earned a bachelor’s degree from Penn in 1976.

She worked at Penn as a secretary and then an administrative assistant in the department of criminology from 1971-1998. She joined the 25 Year Club in 1997 (Almanac September 30, 1997). She worked for the Urban Tree Connection until her retirement in 2006.

As an amateur linguist, Ms. Lafair contributed to The New Dictionary of American Slang and to various books, newspapers and journals. 

She is survived by her a daughter, Eleni Zatz Litt (Neil); brother, Theodore (Sally); sister, Gloria Fraimow; and grandchildren, Jordan Zatz Landau (Elyssa Goldman-Landau), Debora Zatz, Shauna Horvath, David Brenner (Alexandra), Peter Litt (Lana Xu), Eve Nora Litt (Aislinn Wallace) and Anna Litt; and six great-grandchildren.

Governance

Welcome Back from the Senate Chair: Knowledge As a Beacon

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There is a heightened sense of anticipation at the start of a new academic year. Hues are brighter, sounds crisper, aromas sharper, and the very air crackles with electricity. I have always looked forward to this time of year and, as the Chair of the Faculty Senate, I now have the privilege of welcoming you, our fabulous students who are our raison d’être, our wonderful staff without whom this place will come to a standstill, and our distinguished and diverse faculty who are in the vanguard of that most wonderful of human pursuits, the creation of knowledge, back to our lovely and ever-evolving campus. And a particular welcome to the newest members into our fold: you will sense that the colours are just that little bit sharper and the air just that little bit more rarefied, but I assure you we old hands feel it too.

Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose, wrote Jean-Baptiste Karr in 1849, and while it is certainly true that some verities in the Academy are timeless there is an undeniable feeling of change in the air. It is echoed outside our walls in societal unrest and turbulence, hand-in-hand with the most dramatic of advances and changes in technology, sociology, and the human condition. And it is mirrored inside the Academy in the burgeoning new curricula of study, the effervescent search for integrative understanding at the interstices of disciplines, and the truly pan-university creation and integration of knowledge. It is not an accident that the Provost’s Academic Theme Year for 2017–2018 was identified as the Year of Innovation.

In the spirit of the times, the Faculty Senate of the University of Pennsylvania will be taking the extraordinary step of coordinating a University-wide Teach-In on the Production, Dissemination, and Use of Knowledge to be celebrated during March 19–22 of Spring Semester 2018. At a time when the Academy itself feels under siege our goal in the Teach-In is to reaffirm the fundamental search for knowledge that is at the heart of the Academy, in the process knitting together each of the 12 Schools that comprise the University. This is a large endeavour that we do not lightly enterprise; our hope is to engage the entire University community and, indeed, to reach out to the broader civic community around us, in common cause around something that is at the very cornerstone of our being. If you have insights, thoughts, or ideas, or would like to be involved in some fashion, I invite you to reach out to us at the Office of the Faculty Senate (senate@pobox.upenn.edu).

This is going to be an exciting year. On behalf of the Tri-Chairs of the Faculty Senate, Past Chair Laura Perna, Chair-Elect Jennifer Pinto-Martin, and myself, I extend to you all the warmest of welcomes.

Policies

OF RECORD: Policy on Secular and Religious Holidays

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The Policy on Secular and Religious Holidays guides instructors and students in those circumstances when significant observances occur during the period that classes are in session. Anyone with further questions or concerns is encouraged to contact the Office of the Chaplain, which serves as an important resource for all members of the Penn community. The Chaplain and Associate Chaplain can help if any student’s observance seems to conflict with academic expectations.

As a reminder, Jewish holidays begin at sunset. This year, Rosh Hashanah will be observed on Thursday, September 21 and Friday, September 22. Yom Kippur will be observed on Saturday, September 30. Thus, Rosh Hashanah begins at sunset on Wednesday, September 20 and Yom Kippur begins at sunset on Friday, September 29.

––Wendell Pritchett, Provost

  1. The University recognizes/observes the following secular holidays: Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Memorial Day, July 4, Thanksgiving and the day after, Labor Day and New Year’s Day.
  2. The University also recognizes that there are several religious holidays that affect large numbers of University community members, including Christmas, Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, the first two days of Passover and Good Friday. In consideration of their significance for many students, no examinations may be given and no assigned work may be required on these days. Students who observe these holidays will be given an opportunity to make up missed work in both laboratories and lecture courses. If an examination is given on the first class day after one of these holidays, it must not cover material introduced in class on that holiday.
    Faculty should realize that Jewish holidays begin at sundown on the evening before the published date of the holiday. Late afternoon exams should be avoided on these days. Also, no examinations may be held on Saturdays or Sundays in the undergraduate schools unless they are also available on other days. Nor should seminars or other regular classes be scheduled on Saturdays or Sundays unless they are also available at other times.
  3. The University recognizes that there are other holidays, both religious and secular, which are of importance to some individuals and groups on campus. Such occasions include, but are not limited to, Sukkot, the last two days of Passover, Shavuot, Shemini Atzeret and Simchat Torah, Chinese New Year, the Muslim New Year, Diwali, Navaratri, Rama Navami, Paryushana and the Islamic holidays Eid Al-Fitr and Eid Al-Adha. Students who wish to observe such holidays must inform their instructors within the first two weeks of each semester of their intent to observe the holiday even when the exact date of the holiday will not be known until later so that alternative arrangements convenient to both students and faculty can be made at the earliest opportunity. Students who make such arrangements will not be required to attend classes or take examinations on the designated days, and faculty must provide reasonable opportunities for such students to make up missed work and examinations. For this reason, it is desirable that faculty inform students of all examination dates at the start of each semester. Exceptions to the requirement of a make-up examination must be approved in advance by the undergraduate dean of the school in which the course is offered.

Editor’s Note: For mor information, visit FY 2018 Recognized Holidays.

Honors

Gustavo Aguirre: ARVO Proctor Medal

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Gustavo D. Aguirre

Gustavo D. Aguirre

Gustavo D. Aguirre, professor of medical genetics and ophthalmology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, was recently awarded the Proctor Medal from the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO).

 Dr. Aguirre was chosen for his development of unique canine models of retinal degeneration, which provide basic information about their counterpart human diseases. This preclinical work has established safety and efficacy for most of the clinical trial work in progress on neurotrophic factors as well as gene therapy.

The Proctor Medal, named in memory of Francis I. Proctor, honors outstanding scientific research as applied to ophthalmology. Established in 1949, it was the first ophthalmology-related award to honor non-clinicians in the field.

Joshua Becker and Elissa Kranzler: Russell Ackoff Fellowships

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Annenberg doctoral students Joshua Becker and Elissa Kranzler are this year’s recipients of the Russell Ackoff Doctoral Student Fellowship Award from the Wharton Risk Management and Decision Processes Center. The fellowship is awarded to University of Pennsylvania doctoral students who are pursuing research in decision making under risk and uncertainty.

Mr. Becker’s project, “Can Social Influence Improve Financial Forecasting?”, will use a web-based experiment to identify whether social influence can improve collective accuracy for estimates of such values as stock prices, exchange rates and employment figures.

Ms. Kranzler’s project, “Harnessing the Power of a ‘Neural Focus Group’ to Predict Population-Level Anti-Smoking Message Effects on Risky Decisions Among Adolescents,” will examine the relationship between neural response in a small sample of adolescents during exposure to anti-smoking messages and population-level measures of intention to share messages and perceived message effectiveness.

The fellowship is named in honor of Russell Ackoff, professor emeritus of management science, whose work was dedicated to furthering the understanding of human behavior in organizations.

Jere Behrman: Irene B. Taeuber Award

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Jere R. Behrman, the William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Economics and a sociology and research associate of the Population Studies Center at the University of Pennsylvania, recently received the biennial Irene B. Taeuber Award.

The Irene B. Taeuber Award, sponsored by the Population Association of America and Princeton University’s Office of Population Research, recognizes an unusually original or important contribution to the scientific study of population, or for an accumulated record of exceptionally sound and innovative research. Dr. Berhman’s research spans the topics of empirical microeconomics, economic development, early childhood development, labor economics, human resources, economic demography, household behaviors, life-cycle and intergenerational relations and policy evaluation. He has published 415 articles in leading demographic, economic, sociology, public health, nutritional and biomedical journals and 35 books. He has also served on 157 PhD dissertation committees.

Stephanos Bibas: Third Circuit Nomination

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Stephanos Bibas

Stephanos Bibas

The White House recently announced that the University of Pennsylvania Law School’s Stephanos Bibas will be nominated by President Donald Trump to join the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. Mr. Bibas is a professor of law and criminology and director of Penn Law’s Supreme Court Clinic.

Professor Bibas is a former federal prosecutor and noted scholar of criminal procedure. He has argued six times in front of the Supreme Court. He is author of the books The Machinery of Criminal Justice (Oxford University Press, 2012) and Rebooting Justice: More Technology, Fewer Lawyers, and the Future of Law (with Benjamin H. Barton, Encounter Books, 2017).

“We are tremendously proud that Stephanos Bibas has been nominated to the Third Circuit,” said Ted Ruger, dean of Penn Law and Bernard G. Segal Professor of Law. “Professor Bibas possesses a brilliant legal mind, and is one of our most exceptional teachers and scholars. In the course of his career, he has produced incisive scholarship, advocated outstandingly for the clients of the Supreme Court Clinic, and been a mentor to many Penn Law students. His intellect, experience and character make him an exceptional choice for the federal bench.”

“I am deeply honored to have been nominated,” Bibas said. “I’ve had the great good fortune to learn from outstanding jurists, including Judge Higginbotham and Justice Kennedy, and have learned a tremendous amount from my colleagues and students at Penn Law. Penn has supported me in all that I’ve done: teaching generations of students, writing scholarship, litigating before the Supreme Court and preventing wrongful convictions through the work of the Quattrone Center for the Fair Administration of Justice.”

Prior to joining Penn Law, Bibas was an Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York. He received a BA from Columbia University in 1989 at the age of 19, a BA from the University of Oxford in 1991, a JD from Yale Law School in 1994 and an honorary MA from Oxford in 1998. Following his graduation from Yale Law, Bibas served as a law clerk to Judge Patrick Higginbotham of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit and Justice Anthony Kennedy of the Supreme Court. 

Chun-Hsi Chung: American Board of Orthodontics President

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The American Board of Orthodontics recently announced Penn Dental Medicine’s Chun-Hsi Chung as its new president. Dr. Chung is the Chauncey M. F. Egel Endowed Chair of the department of orthodontics. He previously has been a director of the ABO, a position with an eight-year term. ABO directors establish policy affecting board certification of specialists in orthodontics. Dr. Chung was a director representing the Middle Atlantic Society of Orthodontists.

“It has been a great honor for me to serve as a director of the American Board of Orthodontics,” Dr. Chung said. He added, “for the coming year as president, I look forward to working closely with colleagues on how to respond intelligently to the environmental changes in terms of the certification process. I will focus more on promoting board certification for new orthodontic graduates and experienced practitioners. The goal is to have the majority of AAO (American Association of Orthodontists) members board-certified in the near future.”

In addition to serving on the ABO’s Executive Committee, Dr. Chung is also the ABO’s liaison to the American Association of Orthodontists, the College of Diplomates of the American Board of Orthodontics, the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, the Council on Dental Education and Licensure, the Graduate Orthodontic Residents Program, the World Federation of Orthodontists and the Society of Educators.

Ronald Fairman: Society for Vascular Surgery Foundation Chair

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Ronald Fairman

Ronald Fairman

Ronald M. Fairman, chief of Penn Medicine’s division of vascular surgery and endovascular therapy and the Clyde F. Barker–William Maul Measey Professor in Surgery and professor in radiology at Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine, has been named chair of the Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) Foundation. He has served as president of the Society for the past year.

“The Foundation is entering an exciting phase,” Dr. Fairman said. “Our mission is widening. I am fortunate to be serving at a time when we are expanding resources to assist with fundraising and grant writing and as we start doing more to support patient education, patient advocacy and vascular health awareness.”

In his new role, Dr. Fairman will oversee the foundation’s grant-making initiatives.

The foundation is supported by the Society for Vascular Surgery, American College of Surgeons, American Podiatric Medical Association, Eastern Vascular Society, Midwestern Vascular Surgical Society, New England Society for Vascular Surgery, Society for Clinical Vascular Surgery, Southern Association for Vascular Surgery, Vascular & Endovascular Surgery Society and the Western Vascular Society.

Grant Frame: NEH Grant

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Grant Frame, associate professor of Assyriology at University of Pennsylvania and associate curator of the Babylonian section at Penn Museum, was recently awarded a two-year, $245,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities for his Royal Inscriptions of the Neo-Assyrian Period (RINAP) Project. This is the fifth award the RINAP project has received. With the latest grant, Dr. Frame has received a total of $1.2 million from the NEH since 2008. Dr. Frame is the director and editor-in-chief of a team that is editing and transcribing all of the known royal inscriptions of the Neo-Assyrian Kings. The new grant will allow the completion of three volumes in addition to the four that have already been completed.

Oliver Garden: International Canine Health Award

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Oliver Garden

Oliver Garden

Oliver Garden, chair of department of clinical studies at Penn Vet, received the International Canine Health Award from the Kennel Club Charitable Trust. Dr. Garden was recognized for “his tireless work as a small animal internist and immunologist” and received £40,000 (approximately $51,000) to support his future work.

The International Canine Awards were presented on May 24 at the Kennel Club in London. The awards were underwritten by a major gift from Vernon and Shirley Hill of Metro Bank.

“It is truly humbling to be honored in this way by the Kennel Club,” Dr. Garden said. “I feel a sense of immense pride in receiving this award, which is as much a recognition of the countless colleagues, postgraduate students, residents and veterinary students with whom I have had the sincere pleasure of working over the past two decades, as it is a reflection of any of my own achievements ... I very much look forward to continuing my work on canine malignancies and autoimmune diseases at Penn Vet, which wonderfully embraces the ethos of translational research and One Health. I offer my heartfelt thanks to Vernon and Shirley Hill for generously sponsoring this award and for their love of dogs.”

Vartan Gregorian: Honorary Degree from University of South Carolina

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Vartan Gregorian, provost at University of Pennsylvania from 1977-1981, was awarded an honorary doctor of letters from the University of South Carolina.

Dr. Gregorian is currently president of Carnegie Corporation of New York. He is a past president of both Brown University and the New York Public Library.

Irene Hurford: Exemplary Psychiatrist Award

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Irene Hurford

Irene Hurford

Irene Hurford, an assistant professor in the department of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania, was recently chosen for the 2017 Exemplary Psychiatrist Award from the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI). Dr. Hurford, who also directs the Psychosis Education, Assessment, Care, and Empowerment (PEACE) Program through Horizon House Inc., is one of five recipients of the award. The award honors “the exceptional contributions that … psychiatrists make to improve the lives of people living with mental health conditions.”

Dr. Hurford’s research focuses on measuring cognition, treatment outcomes and early interventions for early psychosis as well as and program evaluation. In her role at PEACE, she helps people in early stages of psychosis learn to manage their symptoms and meet their life goals. She also is the principal investigator for statewide program evaluation of first episode psychosis programs in Pennsylvania.

Carl June: American Society of Clinical Oncology’s Award

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The University of Pennsylvania’s Carl June was recently awarded the David A. Karnofsky Memorial Award from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

Dr. June is director of the Center for Cellular Immunotherapies at Perelman School of Medicine and director of the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy.

Dr. June, whose work focuses on the mechanisms of lymphocyte activation, was chosen for his work on a therapy for refractory and relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia that treats patients with genetically engineered versions of their own T cells. The treatment is currently being used to treat children.

Tanja Kral: Alan N. Epstein Research Award

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Tanja Kral

Tanja Kral

Tanja Kral, associate professor of nursing in the department of biobehavioral health sciences at Penn Nursing, has been chosen for the Alan N. Epstein Research Award from the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior (SSIB).

The award recognizes an SSIB member whose work advances the understanding of ingestive behavior and who is less than 15 years from their most advanced degree. It is named in memory of Alan N. Epstein, a Penn professor of biology who pioneered the study of the neural and endocrine controls of ingestive behavior (Almanac January 14, 1992).

 “I am greatly humbled and honored to be receiving this prestigious award,” said Dr. Kral a nutrition scientist, “I would like to offer my sincerest gratitude to SSIB for this honor and for the recognition of my work on identifying behavioral phenotypes for childhood obesity.”

Terri Lipman: Advanced Practice Award

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The Pediatric Endocrinology Nursing Society (PENS) recently awarded diabetes expert Terri H. Lipman its Excellence in Advanced Practice Award. Dr. Lipman is the Miriam Stirl Endowed Term Professor of Nutrition, a professor of nursing of children in the department of family & community health, assistant dean for community engagement and a pediatric nurse practitioner in the division of diabetes & endocrinology at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

The award recognizes a PENS member who holds a graduate degree in nursing and demonstrates clinical skills in pediatric endocrinology nursing as well as leadership in activities such as innovative clinical care, education, research, publication, presentations, mentoring and child advocacy.

“As a long-time member of the PENS organization, I am truly honored to receive this award,” Dr. Lipman said. “In its 30th year, PENS is renowned for its commitment to education and research, and empowering nurses worldwide to provide optimal care for children with endocrine disorders. I am very grateful for the recognition of my leadership in pediatric endocrinology nursing research, education and practice.”

Matthew McHugh: AcademyHealth Mentoring Award

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The Interdisciplinary Research Group on Nursing Issues recognized Matthew McHugh, of Penn Nursing, with the 2017 AcademyHealth Mentoring Award. Dr. McHugh holds the Rosemarie Greco Term Endowed Associate Professorship in Advocacy and is associate professor of nursing, associate director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research (CHOPR) and faculty director of the nursing and health care management coordinated dual degree program.

The IRGNI Mentoring Award honors a senior scientist who contributes to the career development of young investigators who are engaged in research focused on interdisciplinary health services research on nursing issues.

“Dr. McHugh is a wonderful and generous mentor for students and faculty alike and is most deserving of this national recognition in health services and policy research,” said Linda H. Aiken, CHOPR director and the Claire M. Fagin Leadership Professor in Nursing.

Penn Medicine: Best Places to Work

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Penn Medicine placed seventh on Forbes magazine’s annual “Best Employers in America” list, which ranks mid-sized and large employers across the nation. Penn Medicine was included among some of the most well-known and influential companies in the nation, such as Costco, Google and REI. 

“We are extremely proud of the exceptional care we offer our patients, which is sustained by the commitment, compassion and talent exhibited by every single person who works at Penn Medicine,” said Ralph W. Muller, CEO of the University of Pennsylvania Health System. “Our staff is our greatest asset as we work together to continue our efforts as a health care leader.”

See the full list of Forbes’ “Best Employers in America.”

Features

Renovated Hill College House: Preserving Original Design

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Hill College House has reopened to Penn students now that its 15-month, $80 million renovation is complete. The design and construction team was led by Mills + Schnoering Architects and aims for LEED Gold certification. Hill College House was originally designed by Finnish American architect Eero Saarinen and built in 1960 to house women students. The extensive renovation to the five-story, 195,000 square foot brick building preserves the original design for communal living by providing numerous public spaces of varying scales.

Hill College House is home to 500 Penn freshmen from all over the world. Hill College House was originally made up of four identical L-shaped “houses” and this aspect of the design was kept in the renovation. The four sections are now color-coded in bold colors: red, blue, green and yellow.

Highlights of the ‘new’ House include:

  • A 50% expansion of dining facilities
  • Restoration of the iconic “drawbridge” entrance and landscaped “moat”
  • Removal, restoration and refitting of over 400 windows
  • New furniture and finishes that echo the building’s midcentury style and the bold color palette and furnishings of the original design
  • All new mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems and the introduction of air conditioning
  • LED lighting in the center atrium
  • New elevator and lift in compliance with accessibility standards
  • Perimeter wall insulation, a new roof and restoration of two outdoor courtyards.

The building was created with small rooms—mainly for sleeping—and a number of floor lounges and community lounges to encourage socialization. 

AT PENN

Events

Human Resources: Upcoming September Programs

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Professional & Personal Development Programs

Improve your skills and get ahead in your career by taking advantage of the many development opportunities provided by HR. You can register for programs by visiting knowledgelink.upenn.edu or contacting Learning and Education at (215) 898-3400.

Using Spark Hire Video Interviewing presented by Recruitment; 9/6; 12:30-1:30 p.m.; free. Interviewing for jobs at Penn? With Spark Hire Video Interviews growing in popularity at the University, we want you to be prepared. Recruitment and Staffing welcome you to learn from our experts on how to best use the Spark Hire Video Interview tool as a candidate. We will cover what Spark Hire Video Interviews are, why hiring managers at Penn are using the tool and how you as an interviewee can best use it.

Embracing Change; 9/12; 12:30-1:30 p.m.; free. In this short course, author and business coach Todd Dewett explains how you can harness the power of change and benefit those around you by avoiding quick reactions, adopting a positive attitude and developing a 30-day plan to integrate change.

Managing Relationships; 9/13; 12:30-1:30 p.m.; free. Managing relationships isn’t always easy, especially when conflicts arise. With the right strategies, you can effectively manage even the most difficult relationships. This workshop can show you how. You’ll learn to find “win-win” solutions to personal and professional conflicts with assertiveness, collaboration, handling internal reactions and other skills.

Writing Series Session 2—The Challenge of Communicating; 9/13; 9 a.m.-noon and 1-4 p.m.; $75. Before beginning any business communication, it is a best practice to know your audience, and perception forms our understanding of reality. What we see, hear and interpret is what we consider to be true. Another person who may see, hear and interpret something entirely different from the same communication will regard that different perception to be true. In this interactive workshop, participants learn that when our perceptions are different from those with whom we interact, sharing meaning becomes more challenging. Best practices of determining content purpose and structuring materials will be demonstrated, keeping the audience and social perceptions in mind. Note: This session is being offered as part of Business Writing Series. Classes can be taken individually or consecutively as a series. Participants who choose to take the program consecutively will have the option of receiving coaching on their writing the hour prior to the session start time.

Presentation Skills; 9/14; 12:30-1:30 p.m.; free. Fear. That’s the main reason most people won’t make presentations—or make them poorly. By following some simple lessons anyone can conquer presentation phobia and go on to make his or her case successfully and professionally.

Involvement and Engagement;  9/19; noon-1 p.m.;  free. Do you ever ask yourself, “What can I do today to change my life for the better?” Thankfully, research supports that there is something we can do, and it’s actually quite easy. In this session, we will explore two actionable concepts that you will enjoy adding to your daily/weekly routine and that will help you live a happier, positive, purposeful life!

TED Talk Tuesday: Adam Grant—Are you a Giver or a Taker; 9/26; 12:30-1:30 p.m.; free.In every workplace, there are three basic kinds of people: givers, takers and matchers. Organizational psychologist Adam Grant breaks down these personalities in his TED Talk video and offers simple strategies to promote a culture of generosity and keep self-serving employees from taking more than their share.

Models of Excellence Nomination Workshop; 9/26; 2-3 p.m.; free. Do you work with someone who shows special initiative or demonstrates outstanding leadership? Have you noticed that a colleague or team excels at fostering workplace collaboration or shows an especially deep commitment to service? If so, then recognize them as a Model of Excellence. The Selection Committee depends on the content of the nominations to make its decisions. Therefore, nominations submitted should be as detailed and descriptive as possible in order to convey a nominee’s exceptional performance and award worthiness. Be sure to attend this workshop and learn about how best to write your nomination.

Engaging Others in Your Career Path; 9/27; 12:30-1:30 p.m.; free. We all know that networking is an important part of creating our own career path, but how many of us have ever stopped to think about our networking strategy? In this brief session, you will discover the three categories of professional networks, how they can help you in your career path and how you can change your approach to networking to further your career at Penn.

Quality of Worklife Workshops

Dealing with the demands of work and your personal life can be challenging. These free workshops, sponsored by HR and led by experts from Penn’s EAP and Quality of Worklife, offer information and support for your personal and professional life challenges. For complete details and to register, visit www.hr.upenn.edu/myhr/registration or contact HR at (215) 573-2471 or qowl@hr.upenn.edu

Guided Meditation: Take a Breath and Relax; 9/8; 12:30-1:30 p.m. Practice mindful breathing that focuses your attention on the present moment with kindness, compassion, and awareness. Self-massage and gentle mindful movements that promote relaxation and reduce stress may also be included in the workshop. No experience necessary.

Mindfulness Monday: From Mind Full to Mindful; 9/11; 12:30-1:30 p.m. Mindfulness is “paying attention, on purpose, in the present moment, non-judgmentally,” according to Jon Kabat-Zinn. Mindfulness practice develops awareness of your present thoughts and feelings to help you manage different situations. In this once-a-month experiential workshop, you’ll see how mindfulness can help you become more engaged and effective both at home and in the workplace. No prior meditation experience necessary.

Mindfulness Skills Course; 9/27; 3-4:30 p.m. The four-week mindfulness skills course, offered by Penn’s EAP, is designed to teach you the core principles and practices of mindfulness, which include breathing meditation, body scan, sitting meditation and movement meditation. In addition, each class will focus on a theme linking mindfulness, stress and quality of life, and ample time will be devoted to experiential guided meditations. 

Thinking about Retirement; 9/28; 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; free. This is a special program for staff who are approaching retirement soon. These information sessions feature expert guest speakers and Penn Benefits specialists

Penn Healthy You Workshops

Get the tools you need to live well year-round. From expert nutrition and weight loss advice to exercise and disease prevention strategies, we can help you kickstart your body and embrace a healthy lifestyle. These free workshops are sponsored by HR. For complete details about upcoming programs and registration, visit www.hr.upenn.edu/myhr/registration or contact HR at (215) 573-2471 or qowl@hr.upenn.edu

                Spinning; 9/7, 11:30 a.m.

                Gentle Yoga; 9/12, noon

                Chair Yoga; 9/15, noon

                Zumba; 9/20, noon

                Gentle Yoga; 9/26, noon

September Wellness Walk; 9/22; noon-1 p.m.; free. It has been proven that spending more time outside reduces stress, increases energy levels, and boosts immunity. You can start achieving these goals by meeting the Center for Public Health Initiatives staff at noon in front of College Hall by the Ben Franklin statue. We will start with some quick and easy warmup stretches and then get our feet moving. The walk will be approximately two miles and we will inform you when we have reached the one-mile mark in the event that you need to exit the walk early. We hope you will be able to join us. Bring your water bottle and don’t forget your sneakers.

—Division of Human Resources

Arboretum’s 10th Annual Scarecrow Design Contest

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This year participants in the Morris Arboretum’s Scarecrow Design Contest may create a scarecrow for the theme: Halloween Spooky Favorites, which ties perfectly with the new contest end date, October 31. Anticipated scarecrow creations are witches, ghosts and skeletons, interspersed with fictional characters such as Edward Scissorhands and Wednesday Addams.

Sign-up by September 27 to ensure a place in the contest. Entry fee is $35, with a $5 discount for those who register by September 18. Another $5 discount is offered for those who re-use their wood frame from years past. Straw, burlap, twine and frames are all provided, for those who need them. Details and registration are available at www.bit.ly/MAcrows.

Penn Home Ownership Services Hosts Two September Workshops

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September brings two informative workshops from Penn Home Ownership Services (PHOS) to campus. 

On Thursday, September 7, attendees will get answers to the important topic about “Is Home Ownership for Me?” One of the program’s lenders, Guaranteed Rate, will be present at the workshop. 

On Thursday, September 28, featured presenter Clarifi will share the ins and outs of “Understanding Your Credit Report.”

Both September workshops will be held at Learning and Education, 3624 Market Street, Suite 1A South from 12:30–1:30 p.m. Advance registration is required. 

Visit www.upenn.edu/homeownership for more information.

Crimes

Weekly Crime Reports

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The University of Pennsylvania Police Department Community Crime Report

About the Crime Report: Below are all Crimes Against Persons, Property and Crimes Against Society from the campus report for August 14-20, 2017. View prior weeks' reports. —Ed.

This summary is prepared by the Division of Public Safety and includes all criminal incidents reported and made known to the University Police Department between the dates of August 14-20, 2017. The University Police actively patrol from Market Street to Baltimore Avenue and from the Schuylkill River to 43rd Street in conjunction with the Philadelphia Police. In this effort to provide you with a thorough and accurate report on public safety concerns, we hope that your increased awareness will lessen the opportunity for crime. For any concerns or suggestions regarding this report, please call the Division of Public Safety at (215) 898-4482.

08/15/175:55 PM4109 Walnut StItems taken from hotel room
08/15/178:34 PM3400 Spruce StComplainant struck in the face/Arrest
08/16/174:46 AM4109 Walnut StVehicle damaged by unknown male
08/16/179:59 AM120 S 30th StComplainant received unwanted phone call
08/16/1712:08 PM51 N 39th StOffender on warrant/Arrest
08/16/176:58 PM3400 Spruce StConfidential sex offense
08/17/1712:06 PM3400 Spruce StItems taken out of closet
08/17/175:33 PM4001 Walnut StMerchandise taken without payment/Arrest
08/18/177:20 PM3800 Locust WalkUnsecured iPhone taken
08/19/177:05 AM3400 Spruce StItems taken from newsstand
08/19/175:09 PM4050 Spruce StProperty taken from residence
08/19/176:15 PM3820 Locust WalkOffensive words written on walls
08/19/176:42 PM3900 Pine StPurse and lunch bag taken by unknown males
08/19/1711:16 PM4000 Walnut StMale wanted on warrant/Arrest
08/19/1711:51 PM3800 S 42nd StIntoxicated male/Arrest
08/20/175:30 PM3400 Chestnut StIntoxicated driver/Arrest

18th District Report

Below are the Crimes Against Persons from the 18th District: 7 incidents and 2 arrests (2 domestic assaults, 3 assaults, 1 rape, 1 robbery) were reported between of August 14-20, 2017 by the 18th District covering the Schuylkill River to 49th Street & Market Street to Woodland Avenue.

08/14/1712:29 PM3950 Market StAssault
08/14/177:06 PM4000 Spruce StDomestic assault/ Arrest
08/15/178:40 PM3400 Spruce StDomestic assault/ Arrest
08/16/176:58 PM3401 Spruce StRape
08/19/176:43 PM3914 Pine StRobbery
08/20/1712:38 AMS. 47th & Locust StAssault
08/20/174:04 AMS. 38th & Ludlow StAssault

Bulletins

One Step Ahead: Know Your Local Support Provider

  • August 29, 2017
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One Step Ahead: Another tip in a series provided by the Offices of Information Systems & Computing and Audit, Compliance & Privacy

People use various forms of technology in every aspect of their work and most cannot perform vital tasks when technology fails. If help is needed, do you know who to contact?

Contrary to popular belief, there are no generic “computer people” who will fix any issue for a given person at the University. Penn is a decentralized environment and the same is true for IT: Schools and Centers each have their own IT groups that are responsible for providing support to the members of their respective organizations.

Whether you are in need of assistance or just have a question about technology at Penn, your first point of contact is your Local Support Provider, or “LSP.” Your LSP is best equipped to provide you with computing support that is specifically tailored to your environment, and can help connect you to the right IT resources and services available to members of the University. LSPs can help not only with troubleshooting technical problems and issues, but they can also provide valuable assistance and guidance on software installations, network connections, securing your work technology tools, and using technology during work-related travel.

So, do you know who your LSP is? 

If not, please visit: https://www.isc.upenn.edu/get-it-help

For additional tips, visit One Step Ahead on the Information Security website.