News

Future-Proofing Penn Medicine: University of Pennsylvania’s $1.5 Billion Hospital Pavilion

  • May 9, 2017
  • vol 63 issue 34
  • News
  • print

caption:The Pavilion will be a patient-centric hospital to be built for the future; it is scheduled to open in 2021 as the capstone of Penn Medicine’s campus.

The University of Pennsylvania will build a $1.5 billion new hospital on Penn Medicine’s main campus. The Pavilion, which will house inpatient care for the Abramson Cancer Center, heart and vascular medicine and surgery, neurology and neurosurgery and a new emergency department, is expected to be completed in 2021. The facility will be the largest capital project in Penn’s history and Philadelphia’s most sophisticated and ambitious healthcare building project.

“Penn is proud to be the preeminent health system in the Philadelphia region. This building will be transformational, serving as the flagship facility for Penn Medicine and setting a new standard for modern healthcare delivery across the nation,” said Penn President Amy Gutmann. “This is the hospital that will define America’s best medicine for generations to come.”

The power of propinquity—proximity and affinity—will create a patient-centric pathbreaking and groundbreaking design, Dr. Gutmann added.
Flexibility to stand the test of time in the rapidly evolving healthcare field is at the heart of the new hospital’s design.

“We’re building a hospital that will allow us to deliver the very best care the 21st century can offer patients—but we’re also ‘future-proofing’ it to ensure that we can quickly and seamlessly adapt what we do to help our patients in the coming decades,” said J. Larry Jameson, dean of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and EVP of UPHS.

The Pavilion will house 500 private patient rooms and 47 operating rooms in a 1.5 million square foot, 17-story facility on the former site of Penn Tower, across the street from the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and adjacent to the medical campus’s outpatient hub, the Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine.

“As the nation’s oldest teaching hospital, the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania is rooted in a history of firsts going back nearly 150 years,” said Ralph W. Muller, CEO of UPHS. “Now, with the Pavilion, we’re poised for the next hundred years of advances in patient care.”

Some distinguishing features in The Pavilion are:

An adaptable room concept through which patient rooms are equipped to flex between an intensive care unit set-up, if needed, and a standard room as patients recover, or as the patient population and caregiving needs change in the coming years. Each spacious room will include a private bath and a comfortable area for family members and caregivers to stay close by.

A seamless flow of operations—from the emergency department through hybrid operating rooms used for both surgeries and high-tech interventional procedures through recovery and discharge—enhanced by technology and the latest research on how to facilitate and improve care team collaboration.

Telemedicine functionality that allows remote monitoring and consultations, as well as technology to link patients to their friends and families at all times. In-room technology will strengthen communication between patients, families, and care teams.

An eco-friendly construction, design and operations plan that fortifies Penn’s commitment to the environment, through pursuit of LEED certification, and innovations like the re-use of water, 100 percent outside air, and park-like, outdoor green space for patients, families and staff.

The design and planning process for the Pavilion has been orchestrated by PennFirst, an Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) team consisting of the global healthcare design firm HDR, the international architectural firm Foster+Partners, and the innovative engineering design capabilities of BR+A, as well as the construction management expertise of L.F. Driscoll and Balfour Beatty. Staff from each group—as well as Penn Medicine clinical, facilities, and patient experience experts—work collaboratively in a specially designed “integration space” to ensure cohesion and strategic planning and reduce waste at each step of the project.

The building’s design has been informed by extensive and inclusive consultation with Penn Medicine staff, from physicians and nurses to environmental and dining services workers. These groups have engaged with the design team through a series of tours and patient care simulations in multiple full-size mock-ups of the new facility’s inpatient units as well as operating rooms, family waiting areas, and spaces for staff. Patients and families have also participated in tours and provided feedback to inform plans for the Pavilion’s patient experience.

Faculty Senate Leadership 2017-2018

  • May 9, 2017
  • vol 63 issue 34
  • News
  • print

caption:Laura Pernacaption:Santosh Venkateshcaption:Jennifer Pinto-Martin

The Faculty Senate announced its new leadership for the upcoming academic year: Past Chair, Laura Perna (GSE); Chair, Santosh Venkatesh (SEAS); Chair Elect, Jennifer Pinto-Martin (SON). See the Annual Faculty Senate Reports in this week’s supplement.

Penn Vet’s David Galligan and Raymond Sweeney: Endowed Professorships at New Bolton Center

  • May 9, 2017
  • vol 63 issue 34
  • News
  • print

caption:David Galligancaption:Raymond Sweeney

Penn Vet has named two professors to endowed professorships in recognition of their expertise, research and high regard in the academic community.

David Galligan has been named to the Marilyn M. Simpson Professorship. Raymond Sweeney has been named to the Mark Whittier and Lila Griswold Allam Professorship. “Both Drs. Galligan and Sweeney are creative and energetic teachers, and have made significant impacts in veterinary medicine through their research and the training of professional and post-graduate students,” said Joan C. Hendricks, the Gilbert S. Kahn Dean of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. “Dr. Galligan has contributed to agricultural communities through his research in dairy management and milk production, and addresses the important issue of food security in the global arena. Dr. Sweeney has made significant contributions to veterinary medicine in his research of Johne’s Disease in cattle and the pharmacokinetics of antibiotics in horses.”

The Marilyn M. Simpson Professorship was established in 1983 in memory of Marilyn Simpson, a long time benefactor of the School and New Bolton Center. She was instrumental in establishing the Center for the Interaction of Animals and Society at Penn Vet in 1979.

“I am deeply honored to hold the Marilyn M. Simpson Endowed Chair Professorship in Large Animal Clinical Studies,” said Dr. Galligan. “This appointment was possible because of the wonderful colleagues I have been fortunate to have worked with over many years at New Bolton Center. I hope to carry forward their shared passion for the important role of animal agriculture in meeting global food security needs.”

Dr. Galligan is currently professor of animal health economics and director of the Center for Animal Health and Productivity at Penn Vet. He received his undergraduate degree in biology from Penn in 1976 and his veterinary degree from Penn Vet in 1981. Dr. Galligan entered dairy practice with Gap Veterinary Associates, and in 1982 returned to Penn Vet to complete a residency in clinical dairy nutrition. During this time, he developed the DAIRYLP (linear program) to formulate rations for dairy cows, which won a Lotus award for innovative spreadsheet use. Dr. Galligan graduated in 1985 from Wharton with an MBA with a focus on decision sciences. He also mentors students enrolled in the newly endowed VMD-MBA degree program at Penn Vet and the Wharton School.

Dr. Galligan’s area of research is in understanding the economic value of veterinary and associated technologies applied to animal production systems, including products and management strategies. He is keenly interested in helping veterinary medicine to position itself in a manner that promotes economic and environmental efficiency, and animal health. Dr. Galligan’s current economic research includes the development of a number of visual analytical tools to facilitate management decision-making in dairy production. 

The Mark Whittier and Lila Griswold Allam Professorship was established in 1980 by Elizabeth R. Moran in honor of Dr. Allam, who was Penn Vet’s eighth dean and co-founder of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons, and his wife, Lila. Ms.Moran has been a friend and client of New Bolton Center for over 38 years. In 2014, the Elizabeth R. Moran Award for Exceptional Service was created to honor her many contributions to the School and her support in the creation of one of the most renowned equine clinics in North America.  

“Dr. Allam was a remarkable leader in veterinary medicine and a great role model early in my career,” said Dr. Sweeney. “He and Mrs. Allam were tremendously influential in advancing the mission of New Bolton Center, and it is a great honor to hold an endowed chair in their name.”

Dr. Sweeney earned his undergraduate degree from Dartmouth and graduated from Penn Vet in 1982, followed by an internship and residency at New Bolton Center. He has spent his entire 35-year career at New Bolton Center, where he is currently professor of medicine and chief of the Section of Medicine and Ophthalmology. Dr. Sweeney has been the recipient of numerous teaching awards, including the University’s Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching. He is a four-time winner of the Carl Norden-Pfizer Distinguished Teacher Award and was awarded the Distinguished Veterinary Teacher Award from the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges.

Dr. Sweeney’s clinical specialty is internal medicine of large animals, and his research is focused on paratuberculosis and other infectious diseases of cattle, as well as studies in the pharmacokinetics of antimicrobial drugs in horses, the results of which guide rational treatment regimens for these patients. He teaches in all four years of the veterinary curriculum, including lectures, hands-on laboratories, and clinical instruction of fourth-year students.

Wharton School Faculty Teaching Awards 2017

  • May 9, 2017
  • vol 63 issue 34
  • News
  • print

The Helen Kardon Moss Anvil Award

Peter Fader

Peter Fader

This year’s recipient of the Helen Kardon Moss Anvil Award is Peter Fader, Frances and Pei-Yuan Chia Professor of Marketing. The award is presented annually to a member of the Wharton MBA faculty who exemplifies outstanding teaching quality in the classroom.

The Class of 1984 Award

Adam Grant

Adam Grant

The Class of 1984 Award is presented annually to the member of the Wharton MBA faculty with the highest average instructor rating on his or her course evaluations over the previous two semesters (Fall 2015 and Spring 2016). This year’s recipient is Adam Grant, Saul P. Steinberg Professor of Management.

Excellence in Teaching Award

Sigal Barsade

Sigal Barsade

Sigal Barsade, Joseph Frank Bernstein Professor of Management

Sarah Light

Sarah Light

Sarah Light, assistant professor of legal studies & business ethics            

Asuka Nakahara

Asuka Nakahara

Asuka Nakahara, lecturer, real estate

Emil Pitkin

Emil Pitkin

Emil Pitkin, lecturer & research scholar, statistics

Scott Richard

Scott Richard

Scott Richard, practice professor of finance

Richard Shell

Richard Shell

Richard Shell, Thomas Gerrity Professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics and Management

Nicolaj Siggelkow

Nicolaj Siggelkow

Nicolaj Siggelkow, David M. Knott Professor of Management; co-director, Mack Institute

Michael Sinkinson

Michael Sinkinson

Michael Sinkinson, assistant professor of business economics & public policy

Teaching Commitment and Curricular Innovation

Guy David

Guy David

Guy David, Gilbert and Shelley Harrison Associate Professor of Health Care Management; associate professor of medical ethics and health policy, Perelman School of Medicine

Exequiel Hernandez

Exequiel Hernandez

Exequiel Hernandez, assistant professor of management

Samir Nurohamed

Samir Nurohamed

Samir Nurmohamed, assistant professor of management

Core Curriculum Awards:

“Goes Above and Beyond the Call of Duty”

Emil Pitkin

Emil Pitkin

Emil Pitkin, lecturer & research scholar, statistics

Richard Shell

Richard Shell

Richard Shell, Thomas Gerrity Professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics and Management

Jules van Binsbergen

Jules van Binsbergen

Jules van Binsbergen, Nippon Life Associate Professor of Finance

Natalya Vinokurova

Natalya Vinokurova

Natalya Vinokurova, assistant professor of management

Lisa Warshaw

Lisa Warshaw

Lisa Warshaw, director of Wharton Communication Program

Core Curriculum Awards:

“Tough but We’ll Thank You in Five Years”

Wayne Guay

Wayne Guay

Wayne Guay, Yageo Professor of Accounting

Luzi Hail

Luzi Hail

Luzi Hail, associate professor of accounting

Radha Radhakrishna

Radha Radhakrishna

Radha Radhakrishna, visiting professor of accounting

Sophie Reid

Sophie Reid

Sophie Reid, lecturer of communication

Nicholas Rongione

Nicholas Rongione

Nicholas Rongione, lecturer, legal studies & business ethics

Undergraduate Excellence in Teaching

Andrew Carton

Andrew Carton

Andrew Carton, assistant professor of management

Peter Conti-Brown

Peter Conti-Brown

Peter Conti-Brown, assistant professor of legal studies & business ethics

Emilie Feldman

Emilie Feldman

Emilie R. Feldman, associate professor of management

Vincent Glode

Vincent Glode

Vincent Glode, assistant professor of finance

Matthew Grennan

Matthew Grennan

Matthew R. Grennan, assistant professor of  health care management

Rom Schrift

Rom Schrift

Rom Y. Schrift, assistant professor of marketing

Joseph Simmons

Joseph Simmons

Joseph P. Simmons, associate professor of operations, information, and decisions

Richard Shell

Richard Shell

Richard Shell, Thomas Gerrity Professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics and Management

Kenneth Shropshire

Kenneth Shropshire

Kenneth L. Shropshire, David W. Hauck Professor, professor of legal studies & business ethics and director, Wharton Sports Business Initiative

Arthur van Benthem

Arthur van Benthem

Arthur van Benthem, assistant professor of business economics and public policy

William G. Whitney Award for Distinguished Undergraduate Teaching

Steven Blum

Steven Blum

Steven Blum, lecturer, legal studies & business ethics

Saikat Chaudhuri

Saikat Chaudhuri

Saikat Chaudhuri, adjunct associate professor of management and executive director of Mack Institute for Innovation Management

Stewart Friedman

Stewart Friedman

Stewart D. Friedman, practice professor of management and director of Wharton Work/Life Integration Project

Anne Greenhalgh

Anne Greenhalgh

Anne Greenhalgh, deputy director of the Wharton Leadership Program and adjunct professor of management

Scott Rosner

Scott Rosner

Scott R. Rosner, practice associate professor of legal studies & business ethics

Rapaport Family Undergraduate Core Teaching Award

Vincent Buccola

Vincent Buccola

Vincent Buccola, assistant professor of legal studies & business ethics

Hanming Fang: Class of 1965 Term Chair in Penn Arts and Sciences

  • May 9, 2017
  • vol 63 issue 34
  • News
  • print

caption:Hanming Fang

Dean Steven J. Fluharty is pleased to name Hanming Fang the Class of 1965 Term Professor of Economics in Penn Arts and Sciences.

Dr. Fang is an expert in public economics, applied microeconomic theory, and empirical microeconomics. His research integrates rigorous modeling with careful data analysis and has focused on the economic analysis of discrimination; insurance markets, particularly life insurance and health insurance; and healthcare, including Medicare. In 2008, he was awarded the 17th Kenneth Arrow Prize by the International Health Economics Association (iHEA) for his research on the sources of advantageous selection in the Medigap insurance market.

Dr. Fang has served as co-editor for the Journal of Public Economics and International Economic Review, and associate editor in numerous journals, including the American Economic Review. He is a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, where he served as the acting director of the Chinese economy working group from 2014 to 2016. He is also a research associate of the Population Studies Center and Population Aging Research Center, and a senior fellow at the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Fang is the scientific director for the Australia–China Population Ageing Hub located at the Center of Excellence in Population Ageing Research at the University of New South Wales in Australia.

The Class of 1965 Term Chair is one of five created by the class in 1990. This unprecedented 25th Reunion class gift endowed a chair for each of the four undergraduate schools and one in honor of the College for Women.

Deaths

Benjamin Barber, Political Science

  • May 9, 2017
  • vol 63 issue 34
  • Deaths
  • print

Benjamin Barber, a political theorist who worked at the University of Pennsylvania in the 1960s, died on April 24 of pancreatic cancer. He was 77 years old.

Dr. Barber was born in Manhattan and grew up in Greenwich Village. He attended Stockbridge School, a progressive boarding school in Massachusetts. He spent a year studying at the Albert Schweitzer College in Churwalden, Switzerland, and a year at the London School of Economics before earning a bachelor’s degree in 1960 from Grinnell College in Iowa. He then earned a master’s degree in government in 1963 and a doctorate in 1966, both from Harvard. He was a lecturer for three years at Albert Schweitzer College before joining Penn in 1966 as an assistant professor. He left in 1969.

Dr. Barber held a number of academic appointments at various schools and several posts at think tanks and public policy organizations throughout his career. In 1974, he helped found the journal Political Theory and was its editor for the next decade.

He had most recently been Distinguished Senior Fellow of the Fordham University Urban Consortium, founder and president of the Global Parliament of Mayors Project and the Walt Whitman Professor of Political Science Emeritus at Rutgers University.

He was author of several books, most recently Cool Cities: Urban Sovereignty and the Fix for Global Warming, published by Yale University Press in April.

He is survived by his second wife, Leah (Kreutzer); his children, Cornelia, Jeremy and Rebecca; two half-brothers, Charles and Hilary; and six grandchildren.

To Report A Death
Almanac appreciates being informed of the deaths of current and former faculty and staff members, students and other members of the University community. Call (215) 898-5274 or email almanac@upenn.edu

However, notices of alumni deaths should be directed to the Alumni Records Office at Room 517, Franklin Building, (215) 898-8136 or email record@ben.dev.upenn.edu

Supplements

Honors

Abdul-Qadir Islam and Rebecca Kuss: Southern Poverty Law Center Fellowships

  • May 9, 2017
  • vol 63 issue 34
  • Honors
  • print

Penn graduate students Abdul-Qadir Islam and Rebecca Kuss have been selected as fellows in the Southern Poverty Law Center’s Teaching Tolerance project. They will spend a semester working to improve the teaching of the history of slavery in K-12 schools across the nation by curating historical documents and other teaching materials to create a readily-available resource of free, trusted and well-researched materials about the topic for teachers.

Teaching Tolerance is a multi-year initiative dedicated to reducing prejudice, improving intergroup relations and supporting equitable school experiences for children across the country. It produces and distributes anti-bias education resources at no cost to teachers.

Ivan Kuznetsov and Roxana Moussavian: Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowship for New Americans

  • May 9, 2017
  • vol 63 issue 34
  • Honors
  • print

caption: Ivan Kuznetsov

caption:Roxana Moussavian

Ivan Kuznetsov, an MD/PhD student in the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine and School of Engineering and Applied Science, and Penn alumna Roxana Moussavian have been awarded the Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowship for New Americans, a graduate school fellowship for immigrants and children of immigrants to the United States.

Fellows were chosen from among 1,775 applicants based on their potential to make significant contributions to US society, culture or their academic field. They will receive as much as $90,000 in funding over two years for the graduate program of their choice.

Mr. Kuznetsov is currently researching the computationally driven design of new proteins with functions not found in nature — which could potentially be applied to a variety of medical tasks — with support from the National Institutes of Health through the Medical Scientist Training Program. He is the son of Russian immigrants and was born in the US but spent his early years living in Russia and Austria.

Ms. Moussavian, C’11, is an entrepreneur, policy adviser and storyteller who is currently studying at Yale Law School. She is the daughter of Iranian immigrants and was born in upstate New York and raised in California. While studying at Penn, she co-founded a nonprofit that helps students from around the world obtain quality education by connecting them directly with donors through an online crowdfunding platform.

Charles O’Brien, Aimee Payne and Michael Milone: Clinical Research Achievement Award

  • May 9, 2017
  • vol 63 issue 34
  • Honors
  • print

Two research teams from Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine are among the recipients of the 2017 Clinical Research Achievement Award from the Clinical Research Forum. The award recognizes the 10 most outstanding research papers of the year.

Charles P. O’Brien, founding director of the Center for Addiction Treatment at Penn Medicine and holder of the Kenneth Appel Chair in Psychiatry, was awarded for creating the first US large-scale clinical trial of extended-release naltrexone for treating opioid addiction.

Aimee S. Payne, the Albert M. Kligman Associate Professor of Dermatology, and Michael C. Milone, assistant professor of pathology and laboratory medicine, received the award for their research using chimeric autoantibody receptor (CAAR) T cells as a targeted therapy of autoimmunity.

Dr. O’Brien is being acknowledged for his research of a novel approach to opioid addiction treatment. Instead of the standard treatment of daily doses of methadone, Dr. O’Brien and his colleagues used monthly injections of naltrexone, an opioid receptor antagonist drug that prevents the body from responding to opioids. The study was conducted at five sites in the Northeast on patients with a history of opioid addiction who had been recently released from criminal justice restrictions. After 24 weeks of treatment, patients who were randomly assigned to naltrexone experienced a longer median time to relapse and a lower rate of relapse than those assigned to usual treatment. In addition, patients in the naltrexone group had no opioid overdoses while the comparison group had seven overdoses. The findings were published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Drs. Payne and Milone, along with postdoctoral fellow Christoph T. Ellebrecht, were honored for creating a new approach to re-engineer chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells to treat the autoimmune disease pemphigus vulgaris (PV), a condition in which a patient’s own immune cells attack a protein called desmoglein-3 (Dsg3) that normally adheres skin cells. This new method removes the subset of antibody-making cells that cause an autoimmune disease, but unlike current therapies, it does so without harming the rest of the immune system. The researchers used their technique to successfully treat an otherwise fatal autoimmune disease in a mouse model, without apparent off-target effects, which could harm healthy tissue. The results are published in the AAAS online journal Science.

Barbara Savage: Harmsworth Visiting Professor, Oxford

  • May 9, 2017
  • vol 63 issue 34
  • Honors
  • print

caption:Barbara Savage

Barbara D. Savage, historian and the Geraldine R. Segal Professor of American Social Thought in the department of Africana studies at the University of Pennsylvania, has been chosen as the Harmsworth Visiting Professor of American History at the University of Oxford for the 2018-2019 academic year. Dr. Savage will also be a Fellow at The Queen’s College and be affiliated with the faculty at Oxford’s Rothermere American Institute.

As visiting professor, Dr. Savage will deliver a major fall lecture, assist with seminars and organize a symposium or conference related to American history. She will also focus on completing her study of Merze Tate, a diplomatic historian who was the first African-American woman to receive a graduate degree from Oxford, in 1935.

“It will be a great honor to be at Oxford,” Dr. Savage said. “I look forward to sharing my work on African-American history with faculty and students there.”

Dr. Savage is the chair of the Africana studies department. She teaches courses in 20th-century African-American history, the history of American religious and social reform movements and the history of the relationship between media and politics.

The Harmsworth Professorship, established in 1922, has been awarded twice previously to Penn faculty members: Richard Beeman in 2003 and Richard Dunn in 1987.

Christopher Yoo: FCC Broadband Deployment Advisory Committee

  • May 9, 2017
  • vol 63 issue 34
  • Honors
  • print

caption:Christopher Yoo

Christopher S. Yoo, the John H. Chestnut Professor of Law, Communication, and Computer & Information Science at Penn Law, was recently appointed to the Federal Communications Commission’s newly created Broadband Deployment  Advisory Committee (BDAC) by FCC chairman Ajit Pai.

The mission of the 29-member committee is to provide advice and make recommendations to the FCC on how to accelerate the deployment of high-speed (broadband) internet access by reducing and removing regulatory barriers to infrastructure investment.

Professor Yoo is a leading authority on law and technology whose research focuses on the principles of network engineering and the economics of imperfect competition can provide insights into the regulation of electronic communications. He is also founding director of the Center for Technology, Innovation and Competition (CTIC), which is conducting a project analyzing which approaches to increasing Internet connectivity are most effective and efficient.

Features

Three-Year Academic Calendar, 2017-2018 through 2019-2020

  • May 9, 2017
  • vol 63 issue 34
  • Features
  • print
Fall2017 Fall Term2018 Fall Term2020 Fall Term
Move-in for First-year and Transfer Students
Wednesday
August 23August 22August 21

New Student Orientation
Wednesday-Monday

August 23-28August 22-27August 21-26
Opening Exercises and Freshman Convocation
Monday
August 8August 27August 26
First Day of Classes
Tuesday
August 29August 28August 27
Labor Day (no classes)September 4September 3September 2
Course Selection Period ends
Monday
September 18September 17September 16
Fall Term Break
Thursday-Sunday
October 5-8October 4-7October 10-13
Drop Period ends
Monday
October 9October 8October 7
Classes Resume
Monday
October 9October 8October 14
Family Weekend
Friday-Sunday
October 27-29October 19-21 (Yale)November 1-3 (Brown)
Advance Registration for Spring Term
Monday-Sunday
October 30-November 12October 29-November 11October 28-October 10
Last Day to withdraw from a course
Friday
November 10November 9November 8
Homecoming
Saturday
November 4 (Princeton)November 10 (Harvard)November 9 (Cornell)
Thur-Fri class schedule on Tue-WedNovember 21-22November 20-21November 26-27
Thanksgiving Break
Thursday-Sunday
November 23-26November 22-25November 28-December 1
Classes Resume
Monday
November 27November 26December 2
Last Day of Classes
Monday
December 11December 10December 9
Reading Days
Tuesday-Wednesday
December 12-13December 11-12December 10-11
Final Examinations
Tuesday-Thursday
December 14-21December 13-20December 12-19
Fall Term ends
Thursday
December 21December 20December 19
Spring2018 Spring Term2019 Spring Term2020 Spring term
First Day of Classes (Monday class schedule on Wednesday)January 10 (Monday classes)January 16 (Monday classes)January 15 (Monday classes)
Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Observed (no classes)
Monday
January 15January 21January 20
Course Selection Period ends
Monday
January 29February 4February 3
Drop Period ends
Friday
February 16February 22Februrary 21
Spring Term Break
Saturday-Sunday
March 3-11March 2-10March 7-15
Alumni Day
Saturday
May 12May 18May 16
Baccalaureate
Sunday
May 13May 19May 17
Commencement
Monday
May 14May 20May 18
Summer2018 Summer Term2019 Summer Term2020 Summer Term
11-Week Session Classes beginMay 21 (Mon)May 28 (Mon)May 26 (Tue)
Session I Classes beginMay 21 (Mon)May 28 (Tue)May 26 (Tue)
Memorial Day Observed (no classes)
Monday
May 28May 27May 25
Session I Classes end
Wednesday
June 27July 3July 1
Session II Classes beginJune 28 (Thurs)July 5 (Fri)July 2 (Thurs)
Independence Day observed (no classes)July 4 (Wed)July 4 (Thurs)July 2 (Thurs)
Session II & 11-Week Session classes end
Friday
August 3August 9August 7

Events

2017 Beitler Lecture:  Crisis in Criminal Justice: Mass Incarceration and Wrongful Convictions

  • May 9, 2017
  • vol 63 issue 34
  • Events
  • print

The Penn Libraries announce that Penn Law’s David Rudovsky, one of the nation’s leading civil rights and criminal defense attorneys, will deliver the 2017 Beitler Distinguished Lecture, Crisis in Criminal Justice: Mass Incarceration and the Impact of DNA Science on the Phenomenon of Wrongful Convictions on May 16 at 5:30 p.m. in the Class of 1978 Pavilion on the sixth floor of Van Pelt-Dietrich Library Center.

Professor Rudovsky will address two contentious issues in the US Criminal Justice System. First, mass incarceration: the causes and implications of the unprecedented increase in the use of criminal sanctions, including racially disparate treatment. Second, the impact of DNA post-conviction testing beyond the exoneration of thousands of innocent, but convicted persons: what we have learned about wrongful convictions and measures that can be instituted to remedy systemic flaws in our criminal justice system.

In 2002, Lorraine Beitler donated a collection of over 1,000 items documenting the history of the Alfred Dreyfus affair and its impact on the art, society, and politics of France and the modern world to the Penn Libraries. The collection provides a context for international learning and debate through a program of touring exhibitions, publications, and conferences. After donating the collection, Dr. Beitler and her husband, Martin, established the Lorraine Beitler Lecture Fund to serve as a catalyst for the examination of the issues of prejudice and intolerance.

This lecture is free; to register click here.

Morris Arboretum’s Annual Plant Sale: May 12-13

  • May 9, 2017
  • vol 63 issue 34
  • Events
  • print

Morris Arboretum’s Plant Sale offers a wide array of choice plants, including many unusual and hard-to-find items, so leave room in your wagon, and your garden, for a few extra selections.

At the perennials booth this year, several native plants will be featured that will help gardeners to help the pollinators. Many of these important insects are in decline and one of the easiest things to do to support them is grow the plants that insects need. Consider dense blazing star—Liatris spicata, an elegant staple in the butterfly garden and golden Alexanders—Zizia aurea, a host plant for the black swallowtail caterpillar.

Annuals take a new twist this year with the addition of tropical foliage. Look for patterned bromeliads, exotically striped cordylines, and anthuriums with their heart-shaped leaves and long-lasting blooms. Look for ‘Stainless Steel’ —Pseuderanthemum known as the “the little black dress of horticulture.” Don’t forget the culinary herbs: basil, chives, mint, oregano, and thyme, which are all excellent pollinator plants.

The event will be held at the Horticulture Center at Bloomfield Farm, across the street from the Arboretum’s public garden on Mother’s Day weekend, May 12 & 13. Friday is members-only day; join now and save 10% on plants. Saturday the sale is open to the public.

For more info, visit the Morris Arboretum website.

Showcasing Supplier Diversity and Economic Inclusion

  • May 9, 2017
  • vol 63 issue 34
  • Events
  • print

There’s still time to make plans to attend the Penn Supplier Diversity Forum & Expo on Thursday, May 18. This event will bring together suppliers, buyers, local agencies, and organizations from across campus and throughout Philadelphia to celebrate supplier diversity; showcase the resources available to local, diverse and small businesses; and provide an excellent opportunity for business networking.

From noon-2 p.m., members of the Penn buying community are invited to visit the outdoor Expo celebration along College Green. Local and diverse suppliers will be joined by several community organizations in a large tented area where they will showcase their services and answer questions from event goers. An added treat for those in attendance will be the chance to enjoy tasty samples from many local caterers.

The Expo will immediately follow the Supplier Diversity Forum. Due to the high level of interest in the Forum and its limited seating capacity, registration has been closed for this segment of the program.

Advance registration to gain access to the Expo’s tented area and visit with the suppliers and several local organizations is required. Please bring your admission ticket with you for entry on the day of the event. The Expo will be on College Green along Locust Walk between 34th and 36th Streets.


For more information and to register for the Expo, visit the Purchasing website and click on the Penn Supplier Diversity Forum & Fair banner. The Penn Supplier Diversity Forum & Expo is hosted by the University under the auspices of the Offices of the President, Executive Vice President, Government & Community Affairs, and Penn Purchasing Services.

Celebrating Bike to Work Day at Penn

  • May 9, 2017
  • vol 63 issue 34
  • Events
  • print

Come celebrate Bike to Work Day on Friday, May 19. From 7:30 -9:30 a.m., Penn bike commuters are invited to stop by the Penn Museum Bike Share Station, near the corner of 33rd and South Streets, to learn about various bike resources found on campus.

They include:

  • How to use the Penn Bus bike rack;
  • Info about the new Penn Bike Commuter Expense Reimbursement Program that launched in January;
  • Info on how to register your bike for free;
  • Campus bike maps that show the locations of bike corrals and bike repair stations.

There will also be the Energizer Station, which is sponsored by the Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia. Bike lights will be given away to the first 50 participants to visit the resource tent.

More information about the annual event is available at the Bicycle Coalition website. This event is a collaboration between the divisions of Business Services, Facilities and Real Estate and Public Safety as well as the Office of Student Health Service.

Update: May AT PENN

  • May 9, 2017
  • vol 63 issue 34
  • Events
  • print

Fitness/Learning

Thinking About Retirement Information Sessions for Penn Faculty and Staff: May 23

Informative three-part program with each session covering an essential part of the retirement package: Penn Retirement Plan, Social Security and Medicare. Various times; 2nd floor, Houston Hall. Register online or call (215) 898-3539 (Human Resources).

AT PENN Deadlines:
The May AT PENN calendar is now online. The deadline for the Summer AT PENN is May 16.

Crimes

CCTV Locations

  • May 9, 2017
  • vol 63 issue 34
  • Crimes
  • print

The Division of Public Safety is committed to enhancing the quality of life for the campus community by integrating the best practices of public and private policing with state-of-the-art technology. A critical component of a comprehensive security plan using state-of-the-art technology is Closed Circuit Television (CCTV).
As prescribed by the University Policy “Closed Circuit Television Monitoring and Recording of Public Areas for Safety and Security Purposes” (Almanac April 29, 2008), the locations of all outside CCTV cameras monitored by Public Safety are to be published semi-annually in Almanac. The locations and descriptions of these cameras can also be found on the Division of Public Safety website.

 

University of Pennsylvania Cameras

39th St. & Baltimore Ave.
(Vet School—Hill Pavilion)
38th & Walnut Sts.Museum (Kress entrance-interior)
40th St. & Baltimore Ave.39th & Walnut Sts.Museum (loading dock-exterior)
41st St. & Baltimore Ave.40th & Walnut Sts.Museum (upper loading dock-exterior)
42nd St. & Baltimore Ave.4119 Walnut St.Museum (Warden Garden-main entrance)
43rd St. & Baltimore Ave.100 Block of S. 37th St.Museum (Stone Courtyard-lower courtyard)
31st & Chestnut Sts. (Left Bank)Blockley Hall (bike racks 1-8)Osler Circle Courtyard
33rd & Chestnut Sts.Blockley Hall (roof)Palestra (1&2)
34th & Chestnut Sts.BRB II (loading dock–exterior)Pennovation Works
36th & Chestnut Sts.BRB II (roof – rear and front)Pennovation Works (gate)
38th & Chestnut Sts.Caster Building (rear entrance)Pottruck (bike racks 1&2)
40th & Chestnut Sts.Caster Building (bike racks 1&2)Public Safety Annex Building (2-5)
4040 Chestnut St. (front)Chemistry Building (bike racks 1-4)Richards Labs (rear door)
41st & Chestnut Sts.CineMarkRinge Squash Court Parking
46th & Chestnut Sts.CRB (roof)Rodin (bike rack)
Steve Murray Way & Chestnut St.College Green (1&2)Schattner (coffee shop)
38th St. & Hamilton WalkCollege Green (lower)Schattner (bike rack)
36th St & Locust WalkCollege Hall (exterior basement)SEAS (Courtyard)
37th St & Locust WalkCRB-Stemmler Hall (main entrance)Shoemaker Green (1-8)
38th St & Locust WalkCRB-Stemmler Bridge (interior)Singh Center (courtyard)
39th St & Locust WalkCRB-Stemmler Bridge (main entrance hall)Singh Center (east loading dock)
40th St & Locust WalkEnglish House (Law School bike rack)Singh Center (Nano roof terrace north)
41st & Locust StsFels Institute of GovernmentSingh Center (nitrogen loading dock)
42nd & Locust StsFisher-Bennett Hall (overseeing Levine Bldg.)Singh Center (roof terrace south)
43rd & Locust StsFranklin FieldSingh Center (west loading dock)
39 & Ludlow StsGarage 40 (rooftop)SLC (roof, rear)
40th & Ludlow StsGenerational Bridge (1&2)Solomon Labs (1-4)
34th & Market Sts

36th & Walnut Sts.
Gregory College House (bike rack)

Steinberg Conference Center
36th & Market StsGSE on Plaza 1Steinberg Hall-Dietrich Hall (Joe's Cafe)
38th & Market StsGSE on Plaza 62Steinberg Hall-Dietrich Hall (trolley)
40th & Market StsHarnwellStellar-Chance Labs (loading dock)
40th & Pine StsHarrison (1&2)Stellar-Chance Labs (main entrance)
41st & Pine StsHayden Hall (east door & west door)Stellar-Chance Labs (roof-rear)
42nd & Pine StsHilton (Homewood Suites - 1&2)Stellar-Chance Labs (roof-front)
36th & Sansom Sts (Franklin Bldg)Hollenback (lower level rear parking)Tandem Accelerator Laboratory
38th & Sansom StsHollenback (rooftop)Translational Research Labs, 31st St
4040 Sanson St (rear)Houston Hall/Wynn CommonsTranslational Research Labs, 31st St. (upper level)
Steve Murray Way & Sansom StIrving & Preston StsTranslational Research Labs, 30th st. (lower level South)
33rd St. & Smith WalkJerome Fisher (main entrance)Translational Research Labs, 30th St. (lower level North)
34th & Spruce Sts.John Morgan Building (Hamilton Walk)VHUP (bike rack)
36th & Spruce Sts.Jon M. Huntsman Hall (NE corner)VHUP (dog walk 1&2)
37th & Spruce Sts.Kane Park (Spruce St Plaza)Van Pelt-Dietrich Library (Button)
38th & Spruce Sts.Law School (Sansom St)Van Pelt-Dietrich Library (Ben Statue)
39th & Spruce Sts.Left Bank (loading dock)Van Pelt-Dietrich Library (Marke's Cafe 1&2)
40th & Spruce Sts.Levy Dental (loading dock)Van Pelt Manor (bike rack)
41st & Spruce Sts.Meyerson Hal (bike racks 1&2)Weiss Info Commons (front door)
31st & Walnut Sts. (Left Bank)Mod 7 (North)Weiss Info Commons (rear door)
33rd & Walnut Sts.Mod 7 (Southeast)Wharton EMBA (loading dock)
34th & Walnut Sts.Mod 7 (West)Williams Hall (bike racks 1-3)
36th & Walnut StsMuseum (33rd St-exteriorWXPN/World Cafe Live
37th & Walnut Sts.Museum (Kress entrance-exterior)WXPN/World Cafe Live (SW side-upper level)
  1920 Commons (Spruce 38 rooftop)


 

Penn Park

Field 1Penn Park Drive (entrance)
Field 1 (bike rack)River Field
Field 2Ropes Course
Field 2 (bike rack)Ropes Course Maintenance Bldgs.
Field 2 (NE corner)Softball Stadium (bike racks 1&2)
Field 2 (SW corner)Softball Stadium (men’s restroom)
Field 2 (north bike rack)Softball Stadium (women’s restroom)
Field 4 (South Street Bridge)Tennis Center
Lower 30th & Walnut Sts. (1&2)Tennis Center (Field 4)
Paley Bridge (1&2)Tennis Center (Field 4 walkway)
Paley Bridge (entrance walkway)Tennis Center (Transit Stop)
Paley Bridge (walkway to Penn Park)Utility shed
Parking Lot (SW corner)Walnut St. Bridge (Upper)
Parking Lot (NE corner)Walnut St. Bridge (Pedestrian Walkway)
Penn Park (NE corner)Weave Bridge (East)
Penn Park (North)Weave Bridge (Hollenback)
Penn Park (Plaza)Weave Bridge (Bower Field)
 Weave Bridge (Penn Park ramp)

 

University of Pennsylvania Cameras

Hospital of the University of PennsylvaniaPerelman and SmilowPenn Presbyterian Medical Center
34th St. Pedestrian BridgeCivic Center Blvd. at East Service Dr.3910 Bldg. (entrance)
Dulles Bldg. (bike racks–Spruce St.)Convention Ave & Health Science Dr.3910 Bldg. (loading dock)
Emergency Department (Driveway 1-4)East Service Dr. and Health Sciences Dr.3910 Bldg. (parking lot)
Gates Bldg. (fire exit door–Spruce St.)Health Sciences Dr. (outside loading dock–1& 2)Advanced Care Canopy (Bench)
Maloney Bldg. (entrance—36th & Spruce Sts.)Perelman (front door)Advanced Care Canopy (ED 1&2)
Miller Plaza (adjacent to Stemmler)Perelman (loading dock)Advanced Care Canopy (Trauma–1-4)
Penn Tower/HUP Bridge/Civic CenterPerelman Parking garage entrance (Health Sciences Drive)Cupp Lobby (entrance)
Penn Tower Bridge (Hospital side)PCAM staff entrance (Convention Ave.)Garage (front &side)
Ravdin Bldg. (Driveway–Civic Center Blvd.) Heart and Vascular Pavilion (front entrance)
Rhoads Bldg. (1st floor–Hamilton Walk) Heart and Vascular Pavilion (rear entrance)
Rhoads Bldg. (1st floor–patio) Helipad
Rhoads Bldg. (basement–dock ramp) Mutch Bldg. (roof)
Rhoads Bldg. (loading docks 1&2) Powelton Ave.
Rhoads Bldg. (loading dock ramp) Powelton Ave. (dock)
Rhoads/Stemmler bike rack Powelton Lot
Spruce St. between 34th & 35th Sts. (facing east) Scheie Eye Institute (north door)
Spruce St. between 34th & 35th Sts. (facing west) Wright/Saunders Bldg. (main entrance)
Spruce St. (Maloney entrance & morgue driveway)  
Spruce St. (Morgue, Maloney Ground –36th St.)  
Spruce St. (west fire tower door)  
White Bldg. courtyard  
White Bldg. (entrance – Spruce St.)  

Weekly Crime Reports

  • May 9, 2017
  • vol 63 issue 34
  • Crimes
  • print

The University of Pennsylvania Police Department Community Crime Report

About the Crime Report: Below are all Crimes Against Persons, Property and Crimes Against Society from the campus report for April 24-April 30, 2017.

This summary is prepared by the Division of Public Safety and includes all criminal incidents reported and made known to the University Police Department between the dates of April 24-April 30, 2017. The University Police actively patrol from Market Street to Baltimore Avenue and from the Schuylkill River to 43rd Street in conjunction with the Philadelphia Police. In this effort to provide you with a thorough and accurate report on public safety concerns, we hope that your increased awareness will lessen the opportunity for crime. For any concerns or suggestions regarding this report, please call the Division of Public Safety at (215) 898-4482.

 

4/25/171:37 AM4100 Ludlow SProperty taken from vehicle
4/25/171:50 AM4028 Sansom StBackpack taken from living room
4/25/1710:09 AM13-19 Ludlow StLaptop taken from lobby
4/25/171:59 PM3100 Walnut St2 bikes taken
4/26/178:21 AM3400 Spruce StJacket taken from staff locker room
4/26/179:17 AM3400 Civic Center Blvd$70 currency taken from vehicle
4/26/176:29 PM4033 Baltimore AveUnknown person fraudulently received money from complainant
4/26/178:01 PM209 S 33rd StSecured bike taken
4/27/173:23 AM4000 Walnut StFemale wanted on warrant/Arrest
4/27/176:14 PM3409 Walnut StUSPS stamps taken from counter
4/28/1711:18 AM4034 Sansom StreetProperty taken from residence
4/28/176:02 PM3909 Spruce StSecured bike taken
4/29/173:06 AM3744 Spruce StOffender hit by offender/Arrest
4/29/1710:55 AM3637 Locust WalkProperty taken from residence
4/29/172:09 PM3700 Locust WalkProperty taken from residence
4/29/173:52 PM4038 Spruce StPackage taken from porch/Arrest
4/30/1711:20 PM3800 Market StMale wanted on warrant/Arrest

 

The University of Pennsylvania Police Department Community Crime Report

Below are the Crimes Against Persons from the 18th District: 16 incidents with 6 arrests (10 assaults, 3 aggravated assaults and 3 robberies) were reported between April 24-April 30, 2017 by the 18th District covering the Schuylkill River to 49th Street & Market Street to Woodland Avenue.

4/24/175:15 AM3000 Market StDomestic Assault
4/24/1711:18 AM4000 Walnut StIndecent Assault
4/29/173:15 AM3744 Spruce StAssault/Arrest