News

Perelman School of Medicine 2017 Teaching Awards

  • April 4, 2017
  • vol 63 issue 29
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The Leonard Berwick Memorial Teaching Award

The Leonard Berwick Memorial Award was established in 1980-1981 as a memorial to Leonard Berwick by his family and the department of pathology to recognize “a member of the medical faculty who in his or her teaching effectively fuses basic science and clinical medicine.” This award recognizes outstanding teachers, particularly among our younger faculty.

David L. Jaffe

David Jaffe

David L. Jaffe is professor of clinical medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, and has been on the faculty since 2005. Dr. Jaffe is the director of medical student education for the division of gastroenterology. He serves as course director for the Module 2 course in GI pathophysiology as well as for the clinical electives in gastroenterology. Dr. Jaffe is the director of gastroenterology and endoscopy at Penn Medicine Radnor, and as part of Penn’s therapeutic endoscopy group, he has expertise in the management of complex pancreatic and biliary diseases. Influenced and inspired by a host of clinician-educators at Penn Medicine, Dr. Jaffe teaches medical students, residents and clinical fellows about the practice of gastroenterology and endoscopy, and he is proud to continue the department of medicine’s pursuit of excellence in medical education. Dr. Jaffe received the GI Division’s Excellence in Faculty Teaching Award in 2009 and the Penn Medical Students’ award for outstanding teacher in the GI pathophysiology course in 2012, 2014 and 2016. One of his former students commented that, “In the last six months, he has had a tremendous influence on me and I’m motivated to become an exemplary teacher like him, one who always cares for his students and brings out the best in them. Dr. Jaffe is one of the most dedicated teachers that I have encountered.”

Dean’s Award for Excellence in Clinical Teaching (at an Affiliated Hospital)

The Dean’s Award for Excellence in Clinical Teaching was established in 1987 to recognize clinical teaching excellence and commitment to medical education by outstanding faculty members from affiliated hospitals.  One or more Dean’s Awards are made annually, the recipients being selected on the advice of a committee composed of faculty and students. This year there are four recipients:

Kyle Kampman

Kyle Kampman

Kyle Kampman is a professor of psychiatry. He is a staff physician at the Corporal Michael J. Crescenz Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Dr. Kampman graduated from Northwestern University in 1981 and Tulane University School of Medicine in 1985. He interned at the National Naval Medical Center at Bethesda, Maryland and served as a medical officer in the US Navy from 1985-1990. He came to the University of Pennsylvania and served as a resident in psychiatry from 1990-1993. He then completed a fellowship in addiction psychiatry. In 1994 he joined the faculty in the department of psychiatry. Dr. Kampman is the director of the department of psychiatry addiction fellowship at Penn. He supervises residents at the Addiction Recovery Unit at VA. He lectures in the Brain and Behavior course, conducts clinical case presentations and lectures to medical students during their psychiatry clinical rotations. He also supervises fourth-year medical students during an elective in Addiction Psychiatry. One of his former trainees stated, “Dr. Kampman has been instrumental in my career development as a mentor and as a teacher. He is a role model for us with his honesty, knowledge and diligence and is very popular with the residents.”

Anita Lee

Anita Lee

Anita Lee is an associate professor of clinical medicine who practices inpatient and outpatient medicine at Penn Presbyterian and Penn Center for Primary Care. She enjoys teaching and working with all learners from first -year medical students to her peers and is especially interested in making sure the taking of an excellent history and physical with compassion remain the cornerstone of being a doctor. One of her trainees stated, “Dr. Lee devotes herself to her work with Perelman medical students. Her enthusiasm for clinical medicine is contagious and her Introduction to Clinical Medicine course is among the students’ favorites.”

Wanjiku Njoroge received her MD at Baylor College of Medicine in 1999. She then completed her adult psychiatry residency training at Penn. She completed postgraduate training programs in the areas of child and adolescent, infant/preschool psychiatry at the Yale Child Study Center as well as a post-doctoral, NIMH research fellowship at the Child Study Center. In addition, she was also a post-doctoral fellow at Yale University’s Edward Zigler Center in Child Development and Social Policy, and a Solnit fellow in the Zero to Three program based in Washington, DC.

Wanjiku Njoroge

Wanjiku Njoroge

Dr. Njoroge successfully received multiple research development awards from the National Research Service Award (NRSA), National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), and Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). Currently, Dr. Njoroge is the medical director of the Young Child Clinic (YCC) at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP).

She is an assistant professor and is the program director for the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship Training Program in the department of child and adolescent psychiatry and behavioral sciences at CHOP. One of her former fellows stated, “It is rare to find someone like Dr. Njoroge, who not only is a brilliant, superb teacher, but also quite simply an inspiration for budding child psychiatrists and hopeful educators like myself. She is welcoming, open and gives wonderful constructive feedback that drives students to further our own learning experiences.”

 

Kathleen Zsolway

Kathleen Zsolway

Kathleen Zsolway is a clinical professor of pediatrics and the medical director of the Care Network-CHOP Campus (CNCC) Pediatric Practice at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). Dr. Zsolway is also the director of the medical student outpatient experience at CNCC and has devoted herself to outpatient medical student clinical education. A medical student wrote, “Dr. Zsolway makes up the heart and soul of the CNCC. She is an unbelievable physician invested in her patients and her teaching.” Another student commented, “Dr. Zsolway’s enthusiasm and passion for pediatrics and teaching were infectious, and I loved working with her. She truly went out of her way to make sure that we, as medical students, learned as much as we possibly could and I can’t say enough good things about my experience working with her.”

The Robert Dunning Dripps Memorial Award for Excellence in Graduate Medical Education

Kathleen Montone

Kathleen Montone

This award was established by the department of anesthesia in 1983-1984. As a pioneer in the specialty of anesthesia and chair of the department from 1943 to 1972, Dr. Dripps was instrumental in the training of more than 300 residents and fellows, many of whom went on to chair other departments. This award is to recognize excellence as an educator of residents and fellows in clinical care, research, teaching or administration.

Kathleen Montone is a professor, clinician-educator track in the department of pathology and laboratory medicine. She graduated from Penn State University’s College of Medicine in 1989 and did her residency in anatomic pathology at HUP from  1989-1993. Following residency, Dr. Montone took a faculty position in the surgical pathology section where she concentrated her service efforts on head and neck, endocrine and infectious disease pathology. In 2010, Dr. Montone was named the surgical pathology fellowship director and in 2011 was named the chief of the surgical pathology section. In 2014, she was selected to oversee the pathology and laboratory medicine residency training program and in 2015 became the director of anatomic pathology. In 2007 and 2015, Dr. Montone received the Kevin Salhany Award for Excellence in Clinical Teaching. Dr. Montone was selected for Penn’s Academy of Master Clinicians in 2015 and graduated from Drexel University’s Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine Fellowship Program in 2016. One of her former trainees stated, “Dr. Montone really cares about everyone working together with her including her fellows. She always makes sure the program is best structured for the learning of the fellows. Any questions and difficulty, she was our first person to go to.”

Blockley-Osler Award

Allison Ballantine

Allison Ballantine

Created in 1987 by the Blockley section of the Philadelphia College of Physicians, this award is given annually to a member of the faculty at an affiliated hospital for excellence in teaching modern clinical medicine at the bedside in the tradition of Dr. William Osler and others who taught at Philadelphia General Hospital.

Allison Ballantine is an associate professor of clinical pediatrics at the Perelman School of Medicine. She is a pediatric hospitalist at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia where she is the section chief of hospital medicine in the division of general pediatrics. She is also the founder and co-director of the masters in education for physicians at the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education. She has held multiple roles in educational leadership both locally and nationally.  She was chosen to be the speaker at the CHOP graduation in 2011 and was  a recipient of the CHOP Master Clinician Award and Faculty Teacher of the Year. In addition to her passion for clinical teaching, Dr. Ballantine has a strong interest in advancing medical education through the application of the principles of instructional design and programmatic development. One of her former residents stated, “Her pearls of wisdom were applicable on a daily basis and her ability to recognize the pain and suffering in a patient and his or her family while teaching me to examine and assess the patient are things that I have tried to mirror throughout the past three years and also pass along to junior residents.”

The Scott Mackler Award for Excellence in Substance Abuse Teaching

Benoit Dubé

Benoit Dubé

This award was established in 2000 by the Penn/VA Center for Studies of Addiction and the department of psychiatry. Dr. Mackler was known for his excellence in teaching medical students, residents, post-doctoral fellows, nurses and other Penn faculty in many different departments in the area of substance abuse.

Benoit Dubé is a psychiatrist well-known to medical students. As an assistant dean for diversity and inclusion, he champions the importance of wellness during students’ academic journeys. As the director of medical student education in psychiatry, he is present in many aspects of their training: He models good communications skills for them during the Introduction to the Doctor-Patient Relationship course, makes them curious about mental health and neuropsychiatry during Brain & Behavior, and guides them through their first clinical rotation in psychiatry during their clerkships. Since significant stigma persists surrounding addiction to medicine despite improvements in our understanding of the biological underpinnings of this disease, Dr. Dubé introduced a new requirement for all medical students in 2014: attending a 12-step recovery meeting as part of their course work. Hearing first-hand about the impact of substance use disorders from addicts at various stages of recovery, rather than strictly learning from textbook cases, medical students became more aware of their own beliefs and assumptions. One of his former trainees has stated, “Dr. Dubé advocates for students to help them achieve their goals. His counseling on clerkships extends far beyond psychiatry. I cannot think of a faculty member more deserving for recognition of his efforts.”

Dean’s Award for Excellence in Medical Student Teaching by an Allied Health Professional

This award was established in 1996-1997 to recognize outstanding teaching by allied health professionals (e.g., nurses, physician’s assistants, emergency medical technicians). The two recipients were selected on the advice of a committee composed of faculty and students.

Melissa V. Shiner

Melissa Shiner

Carol O’Donoghue

Carol O’Donoghue

Melissa V. Shiner is a clinical pharmacy specialist who practices at the Corporal Michael J. Crescenz VAMC in the Inpatient Psychiatry Unit and has been there for three years. She is a board certified pharmacist in Geriatrics and Psychiatry. She graduated from Penn State University, Saint Joseph’s University, and Temple University School of Pharmacy. She completed her pharmacy practice residency at Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center. Dr. Shiner is a competent and professional colleague, while also being extremely easygoing and fun to work with. Dr. Shiner has an unwavering dedication to patients, unbridled enthusiasm and engaging attitude toward trainees at all levels, former medical students and residents have stated.

Carol O’Donoghue is a lecturer in the Perelman School of Medicine as well as at Penn’s School of Nursing and has been in the department of obstetrics and gynecology since 2008. Ms. O’Donoghue is a certified nurse-midwife and family nurse practitioner and has masters degrees in both nursing and public health. She has  loved teaching the Normal Labor and Delivery lecture for the OB/Gyn Clerkship as well as taking Perelman medical students through the thrill of their first delivery on the labor floor. In addition to medical students, she teaches obstetrics/gynecology, emergency and family medicine residents, as well as midwifery students. Teaching such bright, caring and motivated medical students is one of her favorite parts of her job here at Penn Medicine. One of her former students commented, “Throughout my time with her, she was also uniformly supportive and encouraging of all my questions and participation on the L&D floor. Her love of teaching was obvious and truly impressive. I only wish I could have spent more time with her because she made my time on the L&D floor so positive.”

Dean’s Award for Excellence in Clinical Teaching by Housestaff

Charles Hummel

Charles Hummel

This award was established in 2015 to recognize clinical teaching excellence and commitment to medical education by outstanding house staff. One award is made annually.  The recipient is selected on the advice of a committee composed of faculty and students.

Charles Hummel is a fourth-year resident in obstetrics and gynecology at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He completed MD/PhD training through the UCLA Medical Scientist Training Program, where he was involved in teaching and curriculum development. He has been passionate about medical student teaching from the beginning of residency and has been recognized as an outstanding teacher, receiving the 2015 OB/GYN Department Medical Student Teaching Award and a 2016 Penn Pearl Award. An advocate for medical student education, Dr. Hummel has been described as “the epitome of what a resident should be from the medical student standpoint. He was a skilled and knowledgeable clinician, was fantastic with his patients and therefore great to learn and observe from, and he really catered to teaching medical students to make them feel comfortable.” Dr. Hummel has used his background in research to inform his approach to teaching, and his approach to teaching inspires students to think deeply about the scientific facts underlying medical knowledge. In addition to co-authoring a medical students’ survival guide for the clerkship, as Chief Resident of Education for 2016-2017, he revamped the residency’s didactic curriculum and established a wellness program for the residency; he is also conducting educational research on the effectiveness of curriculum modifications. He will pursue work in general obstetrics and gynecology as a physician with Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, with a focus on resident and medical student education and educational research after residency graduation in June 2017. One of his trainees commented, “His willingness to share his knowledge with me—a random medical student—and engage me on an interesting topic made me feel like he appreciated my interest in his field and wanted me to experience the same joy of learning that he clearly felt. To this day, I remember those facts not because I read them in a textbook but because a friendly resident went out of his way to share it with me.”

The Special Dean’s Award

Paul N. Lanken

Paul Lanken

The Special Dean’s Award was established in 1989-1990 to recognize outstanding achievements in medical education by faculty members, particularly in the development of new, innovative educational programs. The Senior Vice Dean for Education, in consultation with the Teaching Awards Selection Committee, identifies unique contributions by the faculty, resulting in their receipt of this special honor.

The 2016-2017 Special Dean’s Award honors the contributions to medical student education at the Perelman School of Medicine by Paul N. Lanken, professor emeritus of medicine and medical ethics and Health Policy at HUP. Dr. Lanken was instrumental in designing and implementing a four-year integrated curriculum related to professionalism, humanism and medical ethics for medical students. As a critical care medicine specialist in the medical intensive care unit at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania since the 1980s as well as a member of that hospital’s Ethics Consultation Committee in the early 1990s, Dr. Lanken recognized the importance of education in medical ethics and related professionalism and humanism domains. Believing that early education in these subjects was critical, he became a force for their inclusion in the medical school curriculum when the latter was being completely revised in the 1990s. Through Dr. Lanken’s leadership and efforts, teaching in these domains increased from zero curricular hours in 1990 to over 100 curricular hours currently; these efforts resulted in five new courses all of which are required for graduation. He was also the founding director of the innovative Longitudinal Experience to Appreciate Patient Perspectives (LEAPP) program in which pairs of medical students are assigned to patients with serious chronic illnesses and their families during their first month in medical school. The pairs continue to follow their assigned patients and families over the next three semesters while gaining first-hand knowledge about the impact of chronic illness on their patients and families. To further support Dr. Lanken’s efforts and in recognition of his leadership in medical education, he was appointed as Perelman’s founding associate dean for professionalism and humanism in 2004. He continued in that role until he became a professor emeritus in July 2016. One of his former students stated, “I love that Dr. Lanken is so committed to making this course the best it can be.”

Jane Glick Award

Julie Blendy

Julie Blendy

The Jane M. Glick Graduate Student Teaching Award was established in 2010 by the Glick family in remembrance of Jane Glick and her dedication to the Biomedical Graduate Studies (BGS) programs.  

This year the award is presented to Julie Blendy, professor of pharmacology. Dr. Blendy received her PhD in pharmacology at Georgetown University in 1990. She continued on to the Johns Hopkins University Medical Center in Baltimore, MD, and then to the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg, Germany for her postdoctoral research before joining the pharmacology department at Penn in 1997. Dr. Blendy, who is currently chair of the pharmacology graduate group, has provided long standing, exemplary service to the BGS/PSOM/Penn core mission of education, mentoring and training the next generation of biomedical scientists.  She has received considerable praise and appreciation for her efforts as expressed by her colleagues and former trainees from the graduate program, classes and in the lab. Her dedication to these efforts exemplifies the type of scientist and educator that Dr. Glick represented.

Medical Student Government Awards

Each year the graduating class honors one clinician and one basic scientist in recognition of their excellence in teaching. These awards are determined by a vote of the class.

Clinical Teaching Award

Amy Pruitt

Amy Pruitt

Amy Pruitt is a professor of neurology and director of Medical Student Education for Neurology. She is described as “a treasure” and “a fantastic teacher and physician who is loved by all trainees at all levels.” She is known to include clinical anecdotes related to case studies, making the material more tangible. As one student said, “Dr. Pruitt is quite possibly the smartest person I have ever met. She is an incredible student educator and an expert at her craft.” Another said, “She has a unique ability to impart information in a way that makes it impossible to forget.” A third student said, “Fantastic, phenomenal, amazing, awesome—there are just a few adjectives that come to mind when describing Dr. Pruitt.”

Dr. Pruitt received the Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching in 2007, as well as four Penn Pearls Awards presented by the medical students for outstanding teaching in 2000, 2007, 2011 and 2016. She was elected to the inaugural class of the Academy of Master Clinicians in 2013. This is the third time Dr. Pruitt has received the MSG Clinical Teaching Award.  

Basic Science Teaching Award

James White

James White

James White is an adjunct associate professor of cell & developmental biology in the Perelman School of Medicine, where he teaches a number of introductory courses, including gross anatomy, neuroscience and histology. Dr. White is described as an “engaging instructor who helps students find answers for themselves.” One student said, “Professor White is animated and clearly demonstrates a passion for cell and tissue biology. Even though the material is pretty dry, he manages to make it entertaining and interesting.” Another said, “He is clear and thorough and very good at explaining complex concepts.” Students appreciate Dr. White’s willingness to stay late and review structures with them. As one student summed it up, “Beyond being a great teacher, I think this really shows his dedication.” This is the eighth year he has won the MSG Basic Science Teaching Award.

Elizabeth Brannon and Petra Todd to Kahn Endowed Term Chairs in SAS

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Dean Steven J. Fluharty is pleased to announce two endowed term chair appointments in Penn Arts and Sciences.

Elizabeth Brannon

Elizabeth Brannon

Elizabeth Brannon, professor of psychology, has been named Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Term Professor in the Natural Sciences. Dr. Brannon, who came to Penn from Duke University in 2015, is a prolific and renowned researcher whose work focuses on the evolution and development of quantitative cognition in non-human primates and humans. Employing research methodologies that range from behavioral techniques and event-related potentials to functional magnetic resonance imaging and single-unit physiology, she studies how number, time, and spatial extent are represented by adult humans, infants, young children, and nonhuman animals without language. Dr. Brannon’s current research into how training the primitive number sense might facilitate mathematical abilities in children and adults has potential application in guiding educational interventions at a young age that could substantially improve mathematical cognition later in life.

Dr. Brannon serves as associate editor, or on the editorial board, of several leading journals and has received numerous awards and honors, including a Society for Experimental Psychology Young Investigator Award, a National Science Foundation CAREER Award, a John Merck Scholars Award and a James McDonnell Scholar Award.

Petra Todd

Petra Todd

Petra Todd has been appointed Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Term Professor of Economics. Dr. Todd is a highly regarded econometrician, labor economist, and development economist whose main fields of research are social program evaluation, dynamic modeling of individual and household behaviors, and microeconometrics. Her work addresses problems in the estimation of effects of social programs that arise in the presence of nonrandom program placement and self-selection of program participants. She is widely recognized for the significant improvements her approaches bring relative to standard methods used in the field. Dr. Todd has published papers on the determinants of cognitive achievement, testing for discrimination in motor vehicle searches, sources of racial wage disparities, school voucher programs, sexual behavior after HIV testing and methods for evaluating and optimally designing conditional cash transfer programs. She is currently working on analyzing data from a large-scale randomized school incentive program in Mexican high schools; assessing the effects of government regulation on the operation of the privatized pension market in Chile; examining how personality factors shape educational and labor market choices in Australia; and on a book on impact evaluation in developing countries.

Dr. Todd is a former editor of the American Economic Review, the International Economic Review and the Journal of Human Capital, and a current editor of Quantitative Economics. She is a research associate at Penn’s Population Studies Center, IZA (Institute of Labor Economics), and the National Bureau of Economic Research. She has served on the Senate Committee on the Economic Status of the Faculty, the Penn Arts and Sciences Personnel Committee and Curriculum Committee and as undergraduate chair of the department of economics.

The Kahn endowed term chairs were established through a bequest by Mr. and Mrs. Edmund J. Kahn. Mr. Kahn was a 1925 Wharton graduate who had a highly successful career in the oil and natural gas industry. His wife, a graduate of Smith College, worked for Newsweek and owned an interior design firm. The couple supported many programs and projects in the University including Van Pelt Library, the Modern Languages College House and other initiatives in scholarship and the humanities.

Peggy Compton: van Ameringen Chair

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Peggy Compton

Peggy Compton

Peggy Compton has been named the van Ameringen Chair in Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing. An associate professor in the family and community health department, in the School of Nursing, Dr. Compton is one of the few nurses working in the area of pain, opioids and addiction and how they intersect.

She has built a significant program of research that includes one of the most widely used tools available to physicians and nurse practitioners to evaluate risk for misuse of prescription opioids in chronic pain patients; highly regarded studies comparing different pharmacologic and behavioral interventions; and consistent publications in high impact journals in the field.

As an established mentor, she is sought out by pre- and post-doctoral students across disciplines working with them on related projects through to publications and on to positions as faculty in nursing and medical schools. She has also played an instrumental role in the development of professional practice guidelines on the management of pain in patients with substance abuse disorders.

Penn Medicine’s Executive Leadership Transitions: Regina Cunningham, Phil Okala and Lori Gustave’s New Roles

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Regina Cunningham

Regina Cunningham

Phil Okala

Phil Okala

Lori Gustave

Lori Gustave

Regina Cunningham has been named chief executive officer of HUP effective this month after Garry Scheib stepped down from his roles as COO of the University of Pennsylvania Health System (UPHS) and CEO of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP) following more than 17 years at Penn Medicine. Mr. Scheib is credited with transformative, collaborative leadership which has led the health system’s hospitals to post industry-leading outcomes and record patient satisfaction scores. Mr. Scheib will remain in a part-time role at Penn Medicine, as well as teaching and mentoring.

“Regina’s ability to lead across many areas and her deep understanding of hospital operations, especially the role of nursing, were key factors in this appointment,” said UPHS CEO Ralph W. Muller. “As we embark on greater integration of service lines across the hospitals and physician practices, and continuously focus on quality, we are confident that Regina’s thoughtful leadership, collaborative style and expertise in administrative matters will serve the Health System well.” 

Dr. Cunningham began her tenure at Penn Medicine as associate chief nursing officer of cancer services at the Abramson Cancer Center in 2011, a role followed two years later as chief administrative officer of the cancer service line in the ACC, before she assumed her current position as chief nursing executive for Penn Medicine later in 2013. She has also served as an adjunct professor at Penn’s School of Nursing since 2012.

Prior to Penn, Dr. Cunningham held nursing leadership posts at Mount Sinai Medical Center where she served as both senior director of oncology and nursing research. She earned a BS in nursing from College of Mount Saint Vincent, master’s in nursing from NYU, and a doctorate in nursing from Penn. She completed a post-doctoral fellowship at Yale.

Following her numerous previous studies published in nursing and multidisciplinary peer-reviewed journals, Dr. Cunningham is currently principal investigator of an NIH-funded multi-site study aimed at developing knowledge and skills to support implementation of clinical trials.

Phil Okala will become COO for the Philadelphia Region of UPHS. He will be responsible for program integration across the system’s three Philadelphia hospitals. He has been senior vice president for business development since 2013. He came to Penn Medicine in 2007, following executive positions at Geisinger Health System in Danville, Pennsylvania, Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, New York, and MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.

Lori Gustave has been appointed senior vice president for business development for UPHS. She has been the chief administrative officer for Penn Medicine’s Musculoskeletal & Rheumatology Service Line and COO for orthopaedic surgery, where she oversaw design and implementation of the fully integrated Penn Musculoskeletal Center at University City and implemented a new disease team care model for the MSKR. She has also served Penn Medicine in previous roles as associate executive director and director of strategic planning at Penn Presbyterian, where she led a variety of strategic growth and operational improvement initiatives across multiple disciplines.

Deaths

Lewis Rowland, Neurology

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Lewis P. Rowland, neurologist and former chairman of the neurology department at University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, died on March 16 at age 91.

Dr. Rowland was born Lewis Phillip Rosenthal in Brooklyn, New York. His father, Henry Rosenthal, changed the family surname when Lewis was a teenager because Ivy League colleges had quotas for Jews and he did not want his sons to be turned down due to their last name, according to the New York Times.

In 1943, Dr. Rowland joined the US Navy. He then attended Yale University for undergraduate studies and medical school, earning his MD in 1948.

He met his wife, Esther, in 1952 at a fundraising party for national health insurance. They married three months later and moved to Bethesda, Maryland, in 1953, where Dr. Rowland took a position at the NIH. During the McCarthy era, FBI agents sought to question him about his involvement with the Association of Interns and Medical Students due to suspected Communist leanings. Because Dr. Rowland refused to be interrogated, he was fired from the NIH.

He worked for Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx and Columbia University before joining Penn in 1967. Early on, he became known for his work on the biochemical bases of inherited neurological disorders.

He was hired as professor of neurology and chairman of Penn’s neurology department (Almanac January 1968). He also became director of the neurology department’s Biomedical Center for Clinical Neurological Disorders and chairman of the faculty committee to organize a new interdepartmental course in neurobiology at the medical school.

In 1973, Dr. Rowland returned to Columbia University, where he was chairman of neurology until his retirement in 1993.

He focused his research and patient care on ALS and was founder and director of the Eleanor and Lou Gehrig MDA/ALS Center until 1999 and founder and co-director of the H. Houston Merritt Clinical Research Center for Muscular Dystrophy and Related Diseases at Columbia.

Dr. Rowland was president of the American Neurological Association from 1980-1981 and the American Academy of Neurology from 1989-1991. He was editor-in-chief of the journal Neurology from 1977-1987 and editor of Merritt’s Textbook of Neurology, Current Neurologic Drugs, and Clinical Cases in Neurology. More recently, he had served as president of the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation and a member of the Institute of Medicine (now the National Academy of Medicine).

He is survived by his wife, Esther; brother, Theodore; children, Steven, Joy Rosenthal and Andrew; five grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

William J. Zellerbach, Former Trustee

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William J. Zellerbach, W’42, a former University of Pennsylvania Trustee, died on February 5 at age 96.

Mr. Zellerbach was born and raised in San Francisco. After graduating from the Wharton School in 1942, he joined the US Navy and served as a lieutenant during World War II. He was in a Navy beach battalion and saw combat action in North Africa, Italy and the South Pacific.

After returning home, Mr. Zellerbach worked for Crown Zellerbach Corporation, founded by his great-grandfather. It was then one of the largest paper manufacturers in North America. He also was president of the Zellerbach Paper Company for many years. In addition, he was chairman of the Zellerbach Family Foundation and led the foundation’s change in focus to service for the disadvantaged—particularly immigrants, refugees and youth and community arts.

Mr. Zellerbach joined the Board of Overseers of the Wharton School in 1973 (Almanac December 18, 1973). The Zellerbach name was already well known at Penn due to Mr. Zellerbach’s father, Harold Zellerbach, the emeritus life trustee for whom the Zellerbach Theatre at Annenberg Center was named (Almanac October 1968). He joined his father in becoming a Penn Trustee in 1976 (Almanac November 9, 1976). That same year, the Zellerbach Family Professorship in the Performing and Dramatic Arts was established by the family. In 1990, the Zellerbach Family Professorship of Sociology was established with gifts from the Harold and Doris Zellerbach Fund as well as from Mr. Zellerbach (Almanac November 27, 1990).

Mr. Zellerbach was appointed by President Lyndon Johnson to serve on his advisory committee for the Agency for International Development. He also helped establish a Boys Club in Hunters Point, San Francisco, in 1959.

Mr. Zellerbach was married to his wife, Margery, for more than 70 years; she predeceased him in September 2016.

He is survived by his children, John (Mary Ellen), Thomas (Amy), Charles (Patricia) and Nancy Boschwitz (David); his grandchildren, Joseph, Elizabeth Ruffer (Todd), Jennifer O’Connor, Will, Hilary Reek (Terry), Emily Boschwitz and Elliot Boschwitz; and great-grandchildren, Amaya and Tyler.


To Report A Death

Almanac appreciates being informed of the deaths of current and former faculty and staff members, students and other members of the University community. Call (215) 898-5274 or email almanac@upenn.edu.

However, notices of alumni deaths should be directed to the Alumni Records Office at Room 517, Franklin Building, (215) 898-8136 or email record@ben.dev.upenn.edu

Governance

Faculty Senate Executive Committee Agenda

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Wednesday, April 12, 2017, 3-5 p.m., 2nd floor Meyerson Conference Room, Van Pelt Library

  1. Approval of the Minutes from the SEC Meeting of March 15, 2017
  2. Chair’s Report
  3. Past-Chair’s Report on Academic Planning & Budget, Capital Council and Campaign for Community
  4. Discussion on Upcoming Senate Activities
  5. Graduate Student Unionization
    Discussion with Wendy White, Senior Vice President and General Counsel
  6. Update from the Office of the Executive Vice President
    Discussion with Executive Vice President Craig Carnaroli
  7. Faculty Awareness of Textbook and Supply Costs
    Discussion with Christopher Bradie, Associate Vice President, Penn Business Services
  8. Update from Penn Global and International Student and Scholar Services  
    Discussion with Amy Gadsden, Penn Global Executive Director, and Rudolph Altamirano, International Student and Scholar Services Director
  9. New Business

Policies

Of Record: Salary Guidelines for 2017-2018

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The University of Pennsylvania’s merit increase program is designed to recognize and reward the valuable contributions of faculty and staff to the University’s commitment to the highest levels of excellence in teaching, research and administration by paying market competitive salaries in a fiscally responsible manner. The merit increase pool for fiscal year 2018 is based on market trends and economic conditions. With this in mind, the following guidelines are recommended.

Faculty Increase Guidelines

Below are the standards for faculty increases that the deans are asked to follow. The deans will give the department chairs their own guidelines at the school level regarding available resources.

  • The minimum academic salary for new assistant professors will be $69,000.
  • Merit increases for faculty should be based solely on performance as evidenced by scholarship, research, teaching and service to the University and the profession. As in previous years, there will be no cost of living increase for continuing faculty.
  • The aggregated merit increase pool for faculty will be 3.0 percent. Some Schools and Centers may have financial constraints that can only support budget growth of less than 3.0 percent. Salary increase recommendations that are below 1.0 percent for non-meritorious performance, as contrasted with general limits applied to an entire class of faculty, must be made in consultation with the Provost. Likewise, salary increases that exceed 5.0 percent due to market conditions must also be made in consultation with the Provost. Deans may wish to give careful consideration to salary adjustments for faculty who have a strong performance record but whose salaries may have lagged behind the market.

Staff Increase Guidelines

Presented below are the merit increase guidelines for July 1, 2017.

  • This year, the University has set an aggregate merit salary increase pool of 3.0 percent with a range for individual increases of zero to 5.0 percent. Merit increases should not exceed 5.0 percent. Some schools and centers may have financial constraints that affect the salary increase percentage that can be awarded, resulting in a merit increase pool of less than 3.0 percent. Administrators of these schools or centers will communicate this information separately, after consultation with the Provost and the Executive Vice President.
  • Monthly, weekly and hourly paid staff members are eligible for a merit increase if they are regular full-time, regular part-time or limited service status employees, and are employed by the University on or before February 28, 2017. The following groups are not covered under these guidelines: student workers, interns, residents, occasional and temporary workers, staff on unpaid leave of absence, staff on long term disability, and staff who are covered by collective bargaining agreements.
  • The merit increase program is designed to recognize and reward performance. The foundation of this program is the Performance and Staff Development Plan. Salary increases should be based on performance contributions within the parameters of the merit increase budget. The performance appraisal system documents each employee’s performance and contributions and establishes performance goals for the new fiscal year. All employees must receive a Performance and Staff Development Plan for the next review cycle whether or not they receive a merit increase. Schools and Centers are requested to submit performance appraisals by June 1, 2017. The Division of Human Resources’ Staff and Labor Relations team is available to discuss performance management issues.
  • Merit increases should average no more than 3.0 percent and may average less if a School or Center establishes a lower percentage merit pool based on financial considerations. The aggregated salary pool within a School or Center may not exceed 3.0 percent regardless of performance rating distributions. Performance expectations should be raised each year as employees grow in experience and job mastery. Performance ratings and raises should reflect a normal distribution for all employees. Employees with unacceptable performance are not eligible for a merit increase.
  • The University’s salary ranges have been increased effective April 1, 2017. All staff salaries must be at or above the minimum of their respective grades as of April 1, 2017.
  • There will be no bonuses, in keeping with the elimination of discretionary bonuses announced in prior years.

The Division of Human Resources’ Compensation office is available to discuss specific merit increase parameters with Schools and Centers. Staff and Labor Relations team members are available to discuss performance management issues.

—Amy Gutmann, President
—Vincent Price, Provost
—Craig Carnaroli, Executive Vice President

Features

2017 President’s Engagement and Innovation Prize Winners at Penn

  • April 4, 2017
  • vol 63 issue 29
  • Features
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University of Pennsylvania President Amy Gutmann announced the selection of eight undergraduates as recipients of the 2017 President’s Engagement and Innovation Prizes. Awarded annually, the President’s Engagement and Innovation Prizes provide $100,000 in funding for Penn seniors to design and undertake post-graduation projects that make a positive, lasting difference in the world.

Seven Penn seniors were named recipients of the President’s Engagement Prize. They are Alexa Salas, Camilo Toro and Yaneli Arizmendi for Lanzando Líderes; Marcus Henderson and Ian McCurry for Homeless Health and Nursing; and Antoinette Zoumanigui and Selamawit Bekele for Project Y.V.E.T.A. This year’s President’s Innovation Prize was awarded to William Fry for SolutionLoft.

“These members of the Class of 2017 have set out to implement an extraordinarily promising venture, and each has brought to the table an outstanding ability and an infectious eagerness to make a tangible, substantial, sustainable impact,” President Gutmann said. “I am deeply grateful to the Selection Committees for recommending to me a group of projects that embody the spirit of public service and innovation upon which the University was founded. From Philadelphia to Senegal, Lanzando Líderes, Homeless Health and Nursing, Project Y.V.E.T.A. and SolutionLoft tackle timely, consequential challenges with innovative, inspiring solutions. I congratulate all of this year’s Prize recipients, and I look forward to seeing the positive differences they will make in Philadelphia, across the country and around the world.”

Each project will receive up to $100,000, plus a $50,000 living stipend per team member. The student recipients will spend the next year implementing their projects. Details on their projects are as follows:

Alexa Salas, Camilo Toro and Yaneli Arizmendi

Alexa Salas, Camilo Toro and Yaneli Arizmendi

Alexa Salas, Camilo Toro and Yaneli Arizmendi, Lanzando Líderes: Ms. Salas and Mr. Toro, seniors in the College of Arts & Sciences, and Ms. Arizmendi, a senior in the School of Nursing, will design a community-based after-school program for Latino high school students in South Philadelphia. They will develop an experiential, bilingual, culturally inclusive curriculum to serve as the touchstone for the program, which will work with Latino immigrant families and members of the community. Their project, Lanzando Líderes, aims to bridge educational disparities and help students develop self-efficacy to reach their personal, educational and professional goals. They are being mentored by Toni Villarruel, the Margaret Bond Simon Dean of Nursing.

Ian McCurry

Ian McCurry

Marcus Henderson

Marcus Henderson

Marcus Henderson and Ian McCurry, Homeless Health and Nursing: Building Community Partnerships for a Healthier Future: Mr. McCurry and Mr. Henderson, both seniors in the School of Nursing, will integrate innovative healthcare case management into the current program of homeless services offered by the Bethesda Project, a Philadelphia-based nonprofit that provides proactive case management and housing services to the homeless population. Through their work with Bethesda and other key partners, Mr. Henderson and Mr. McCurry seek to decrease health disparities and increase access to high-quality, person-centered healthcare for this underserved population. They are being mentored by Terri Lipman, assistant dean for community engagement and the Miriam Stirl Endowed Term Professor of Nutrition in the School of Nursing.

Selamawit Bekele and Antoinette Zoumanigui

Selamawit Bekele and Antoinette Zoumanigui

Antoinette Zoumanigui and Selamawit Bekele, Project Y.V.E.T.A.: Ms. Zoumanigui and Ms. Bekele, both seniors in the College of Arts & Sciences, are spearheading Project Y.V.E.T.A., Youth for Vocational Education and Training in Agriculture, a school that will empower the marginalized youth of Senegal called Talibés. In partnership with the Senegalese Ministry of Agriculture, Project Y.V.E.T.A. will provide Talibés with an education focused on improving numeracy and literacy skills while also providing technical training in agriculture and agri-entrepreneurship. Project Y.V.E.T.A.’s integration of traditional education with vocational skills is the first of its kind in Senegal. They are being mentored by Cheikh Babou, associate professor of history.

William Fry

William Fry

William Fry, SolutionLoft:  Mr. Fry, a senior in the College of Arts & Sciences and Wharton School, will use the President’s Innovation Prize as a catalyst for SolutionLoft, a company that he co-founded in 2016. SolutionLoft aims to bring the power of software creation to everyone, regardless of technical skills or income level. To reach this goal, SolutionLoft has designed a proprietary code engine that enables code to be re-used, streamlining the development process. Mr. Fry is being mentored by Jeffrey Babin, associate professor of practice in mechanical engineering and applied mechanics.

“These prize-winning projects,” said Provost Vincent Price, “exemplify the vision and passion of our Penn students, who are strongly committed to making a difference in the world. We are indebted to their outstanding faculty advisors and to the staff of the Center for Undergraduate Research and Fellowships (CURF), who worked closely with them to help develop their ideas into these inspiring new ventures.”

Over the past two years, Penn has awarded nearly $1.5 million in Prize funds and living stipends between the President’s Engagement Prize and President’s Innovation Prize, making these the largest prizes of their kind in higher education. Eighty seniors submitted applications for both Prizes this year, with proposals spanning a diverse array of social impact ideas. 

The President’s Engagement and Innovation Prizes are intended to strengthen Penn’s commitment under the Penn Compact 2020 to impactful local, national and global student engagement, as well as innovation and entrepreneurship.

The Prizes are generously supported by Trustee Judith Bollinger and William G. Bollinger, Trustee Lee Spelman Doty and George E. Doty Jr. and Emeritus Trustee James S. Riepe and Gail Petty Riepe. Vice Provost for Education Beth Winkelstein chaired the President’s Engagement Prize Selection Committee on behalf of Provost Price, and Executive Vice President Craig Carnaroli chaired the President’s Innovation Prize Selection Committee.

Events

Online Learning and Inclusive Teaching

  • April 4, 2017
  • vol 63 issue 29
  • Events
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The Faculty Senate invites the Penn community to two upcoming events of special interest to faculty, post-docs and teaching assistants.

Tuesday, April 4, 4-6 p.m., 8th floor, Jon M. Huntsman Hall, Online Learning at Penn:  Where Are We Going?; panelists: Peter Decherney (SAS/English), Kostas Daniilidis (SEAS/CIS), Don Huesman & Anne Trumbore (Wharton Online Learning). No RSVP required. What is the vision for Online Learning at Penn? What innovations are happening now across schools? Join the Faculty Senate Committee on Faculty and the Academic Mission for this interactive discussion on the future of online learning at Penn. Participation is encouraged for faculty members who oversee academic programs in their schools.

Friday, April 7, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., 6th floor, Kislak Center, Van Pelt-Dietrich Library; Inclusive Teaching Practices, a community discussion of inclusive teaching and diversity in the classroom and other venues where teaching takes place. This conversation will bring together Penn faculty, instructors and students, both undergraduate and graduate, to discuss our aspirations related to teaching a diverse student body, and to learning in this setting, as well as the challenges in pursuing inclusive teaching, and the sorts of actions we want to take to address those difficulties and pursue our goals. This dialogue is intended to enable us to hear from one another, to promote greater understanding of our varied perspectives and experiences, all while identifying practices we can employ going forward. All who are teachers or students at Penn are welcome; PennCard required; lunch is included with RSVP. Hosted by the Center for Teaching and Learning, co-sponsored by the Faculty Senate.

Continuum

  • April 4, 2017
  • vol 63 issue 29
  • Events
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TEXT

Continuum, by Rebecca Kamen

Continuum, by Rebecca Kamen is a new exhibit opening on April 13 in the Esther Klein Gallery. It is an exploration of the relationship between inner and outer space, showcasing the multimedia installation NeuroCantos, created in collaboration with sound artist Susan Alexjander. The exhibit will run through May 27. There will be an opening reception April 13, 5-7:30 p.m., featuring a live performative dance element by Megan Mizanty.

Closing Reception for Children

  • April 4, 2017
  • vol 63 issue 29
  • Events
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There will be a closing reception this Thursday, April 6, from 4-6 p.m. for the current exhibit of Jerry Porter’s photographs of Children from around the world. It will be an opportunity for those who have not seen the show to meet the photographer, see his numerous photographs and chat about them. The show is at the Burrison Gallery, on the second floor, Inn at Penn, 3611 Walnut Street; it closes on April 12.

Update: April AT PENN

  • April 4, 2017
  • vol 63 issue 29
  • Events
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Talks

4      A la découverte d’un continent oublie; Guillaume Soulez, Université Sorbonne Nouvelle; 5 p.m.; Cherpack Seminar rm. 543, Williams Hall (French & Francophone Studies).

     Show me the Money: Spring Conference; Adam Block, Sony Music Entertainment; 5 p.m.; rm. 345, JMHH (Wharton Undergrad Media & Entertainment Club).

5    Silvers Visiting Scholar Lecture: Speaking Jewish, Writing English; Hana Wirth-Nesher, Tel Aviv University; 5 p.m.; B26, Stiteler Hall (Jewish Studies Program).

6    The Need for Speed: Evolutionary Specializations of xElectric Fish Ion Channels for Generating Brief Signals; Harold Zakon, University of Texas at Austin; 4 p.m.; Tedori Family Auditorium, Stephen A. Levin Building (Biology).

    Dylan Interpretations, Interpreting Dylan; panel discussing Bob Dylan’s most recent work; 5 p.m.; Arts Café, Kelly Writers House (KWH).

7    What Are/Should We Be Doing When We Do Normative Inquiry?; David Plunkett, Dartmouth; 3 p.m.; rm. 402, Claudia Cohen Hall (Philosophy).

11    Generation Stalin: French Writers, the Fatherland and the Cult of Personality; Andrew Sobanet, Georgetown; 5 p.m.; Cherpack Seminar Room 543, Williams Hall (French and Francophone Studies).

    Risley, The Imperial Japanese Troupe, and Philadelphia; Frederik Schodt, translator, writer; 4:30 p.m.; Terrace Room, Claudia Cohen Hall (Center for East Asian Studies).

12    Show Me the Money in Media & Entertainment: Spring Conference; Lew Schneider (C’83), The Goldbergs and Everybody Loves Raymond; 5 p.m.; rm. G60, JMHH (Wharton Undergrad Media & Entertainment Club).

AT PENN Deadlines

The April AT PENN calendar is now online. The deadline for the May AT PENN is April 11.

Crimes

Weekly Crime Reports

  • April 4, 2017
  • vol 63 issue 29
  • Crimes
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The University of Pennsylvania Police Department

About the Crime Report: Below are all Crimes Against Persons, Property and Crimes Against Society from the campus report for March 20-26, 2017. View prior weeks' reports. —Ed.

This summary is prepared by the Division of Public Safety and includes all criminal incidents reported and made known to the University Police Department between the dates of March 20-26, 2017. The University Police actively patrol from Market Street to Baltimore Avenue and from the Schuylkill River to 43rd Street in conjunction with the Philadelphia Police. In this effort to provide you with a thorough and accurate report on public safety concerns, we hope that your increased awareness will lessen the opportunity for crime. For any concerns or suggestions regarding this report, please call the Division of Public Safety at (215) 898-4482.

03/21/20171:50 PM4001 Spruce StTheftCopper wire taken from building
03/21/20171:51 PM601 University AveTheftEquipment taken from trailers
03/22/20171:38 PM4040-4042 Walnut StFraudUnauthorized charges on credit card
03/23/20173:13 PM3400 Civic Center BlvdTheftMedication taken from purse
03/23/20174:34 PM380 University AveTheftSecured bike taken
03/23/20177:51 PM3701 Walnut StTheftProperty taken from locker
03/23/201711:39 PM4055 Spruce StBurglaryComputer taken from residence
03/24/201712:52 AM4035 Chestnut StFraudAccount created without authorization
03/24/20175:23 PM3601 Walnut StTheftMerchandise taken without payment/Arrest
03/24/20175:55 PM3400 Spruce StDisorderly ConductMale causing disturbance/Arrest
03/24/20176:28 PM3400 Spruce StOther OffenseMale wanted on probation violation/Arrest
03/24/20176:54 PM300 S 38th StVandalismWindow to vehicle broken
03/24/20179:18 PM3411 Chestnut StTheftSecured bike taken
03/25/20171:19 AM4000 Market StDUIIntoxicated driver arrested
03/25/20172:07 PM3417 Spruce StOther OffenseMale cited for trespass
03/25/20173:15 PM201 S 40th StTheftUnsecured wallet taken, charges made on credit card
03/25/20175:02 PM4200 Locust StRobberyOffenders attempted to take cell phone
03/25/20177:26 PM319 41st StTheftUnsecured backpack taken
03/26/20173:34 AM4000 Delancey StDrunkennessIntoxicated male/Arrest
03/26/20176:36 PM3700 Spruce StFraudUnauthorized charges made

18th District

Below are the Crimes Against Persons from the 18th District: 8 incident with 3 arrests (5 robberies, 2 aggravated assaults, 1 domestic assault) were reported between March 20-26, 2017 by the 18th District covering the Schuylkill River to 49th Street & Market Street to Woodland Avenue.

03/20/201712:49 PM42nd and Walnut StDomestic Assault
03/20/201711:51 PM4332 Pine StRobbery/Arrest
03/22/20177:26 PM4600 Market StAggravated Assault/Arrest
03/22/20177:50 PM48th and Market StAggravated Assault/Arrest
03/22/201710:01 PM46th and Hazel AveRobbery
03/23/20172:38 PM46th and Market StRobbery
03/24/20172:29 AM817 S 48th StRobbery
03/25/20175:10 PM42nd and Locust StRobbery

Bulletins

One Step Ahead: Sharing Your PennKey Password Is Not Smart Computing

  • April 4, 2017
  • vol 63 issue 29
  • Bulletins
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PennKey passwords are like keys– they are used to gain or unlock access to areas that otherwise are protected from others.

When you are given your PennKey password and the access it provides to Penn’s information systems, it is in support of your work duties and/or educational pursuits. Your password is a symbol of the trust placed in you to act in a responsible manner when using Penn’s systems. As part of that responsibility, you are expected to follow Penn’s Acceptable Use Policy and—not share your password—with anyone. Password security of each individual account is an important line of defense against unauthorized users on the system. Keeping your account secure is necessary not only to protect your own files and resources, but to protect the entire system.

Sharing your PennKey password may also mean that you are sharing access to data that is protected as confidential under federal and local laws. You may be providing the “keys” to others who are not authorized to access that type of data thereby placing Penn as well as yourself at risk. In addition, your PennKey password is also a “key” to your personal information, and protecting it helps keep a “lock” on your privacy. Think of it like sharing your banking information. Would you give someone else your bank account or credit card number? Not a smart thing to do, and neither is sharing your password.

If you have shared your PennKey password with someone else, you should immediately change it. Information regarding how to change your password is available on the PennKey website.

Once reset, do not share your PennKey password with anyone.