News

$5 Million Gift to Penn Vet to Establish the Dr. Harry Werner Professorship in Equine Medicine

  • December 13, 2016
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A transformational gift of $5 million by the estate of Seth and Lucy Holcombe will establish the Dr. Harry Werner Professorship in Equine Medicine at New Bolton Center, the large animal hospital of the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine (Penn Vet).

The endowed chair is named for the Holcombe’s veterinarian and life-long friend, Harry Werner, a 1974 Penn Vet graduate. Dr. Werner cared for the Holcombe’s Morgan horses since the early days of his career, working as a veterinarian in Granby, Connecticut.

The professorship will include teaching, research, and clinical outreach, with an emphasis on equine welfare and wellness, important to both the Holcombes and Werners.
Penn Vet is conducting an international search for candidates, with a goal of awarding the professorship in 2017.

“We are delighted that Dr. Werner’s clients have honored him with this wonderful gift to improve the lives of horses through a new program at New Bolton Center,” said Joan C. Hendricks,  the Gilbert S. Kahn Dean of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

“Harry is a very distinguished alumnus, and we are extremely proud of his achievements globally to support equine welfare,” Dr. Hendricks continued. “This will provide a permanent tribute to him.”

Although Dr. Werner and his wife, Susan, were close friends with the Holcombes, the gift came as a surprise. A family lawyer delivered the news after Lucy Holcombe’s death at age 91 in January 2016. Seth Holcombe died at age 91 in 2009.

“We had no idea,” said Dr. Werner, about the donation in his honor. “Susan and I feel responsible for making sure this gift does what the Holcombes wanted it to do. We want this to enhance the health and welfare of horses.”

The professorship will be the centerpiece of what the Werners intend to become a broader program for equine wellness and welfare, attracting international speakers and reaching out to populations of working horses in need.

“This gift will allow Penn Vet to truly take a lead in providing direction on equine wellbeing and welfare to both our profession and the horse industry,” said Gary Althouse, chairman of the department of clinical studies at New Bolton Center. “The ability to dedicate significant efforts to these critical initiatives is truly transformational.”

Dr. Althouse said the new equine professorship builds upon a New Bolton Center initiative for large animal welfare, including participation in specialty training for board certification by the new American College of Animal Welfare.

Dr. Werner has dedicated his life and career to the care and welfare of animals through his practice, Werner Equine, in North Granby, Connecticut and his continued service to veterinary professional organizations at state, national and international levels.

He was the 2009 President of the American Association of Equine Practitioners and is now part of the AAEP’s Welfare and Public Policy Advisory Council. He is also on the American Veterinary Medical Association’s Animal Welfare Committee and World Equine Veterinary Association’s Board of Directors.

Dr. Werner speaks internationally and has authored many articles on equine welfare, equine lameness, pre-purchase exams, farrier-veterinarian relationships, and veterinary ethics.

$1.1 Million NSF Grant for Penn Researchers to Protect Internet Security

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University of Pennsylvania researchers Nadia Heninger, Ted Chinburg, Brett Hemenway and Zach Scherr are trying to break the internet—but only so they can protect it.

The team of computer scientists and mathematicians received a four-year, $1.1 million grant from the Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace program of the National Science Foundation (NSF) to use mathematics to better understand modern cryptography systems. Such systems allow for the transmission of secure communications over insecure wireless channels. Specifically, the researchers are focusing on a type of public key encryption called RSA.

A little more than a year into the project, they have published their first paper and are working on next steps to further combine their expertise in arithmetic geometry and cryptography. By linking these subjects in a novel way, they hope to develop tools applicable to a broad range of cryptographic systems.

The collaboration came about serendipitously. In 2014, Dr. Heninger, the Magerman Term Assistant Professor in the computer and information science department in Penn’s School of Engineering and Applied Science, gave a talk to the math department in Penn’s School of Arts & Sciences, where Dr. Chinburg is a professor and Dr. Scherr, who is now at Bucknell University, was one of several Hans Rademacher Instructors of Mathematics.

“She was doing something in a subject I knew about, namely capacity theory,” Dr. Chinburg said. “I realized that capacity theory could tell whether or not you could really improve,” an important aspect of what has come to be called the Coppersmith method.

In the Coppersmith method, if you have two 500-digit numbers, a computer can easily multiply them and return a product, but how about doing the reverse? If you know that a huge number came from two factors but you don’t know either one, how would you determine those factors? Don Coppersmith, a cryptographer and mathematician, discovered in the 1990s that if you knew half the digits of the bigger of the two numbers, you could eventually discover both numbers precisely.

“This was a very important result and it was a surprise to many people,” Dr. Chinburg said. The Penn team wanted to go a step further. “Suppose you knew fewer of the digits of that larger number? Could you still determine a rapid algorithm to find the factors? Coppersmith had been inventing a part of capacity theory without realizing this.”

Capacity theory, an aspect of number theory, derives from the study of how electric charges disperse on different types of objects. Repelling electrical charges move to minimize their total potential energy. In the past century, scientists discovered that the physics of this process could help predict whether various problems in number theory could be solved.

To do this requires building a physical model of the number theoretic problem. If the electrical charges in that model can’t move around in a way that enables them to reach a small enough total energy, the original number theory problem cannot be solved.

In its first paper, the Penn group used this method to put sharp bounds on how far science could improve the technique Coppersmith used to prove this theorem. The researchers learned that making a substantial improvement in Coppersmith’s final result would really require a different technique.

So how does this relate to the internet? There are many different ways to attack the internet’s security; the Penn researchers decided to tackle RSA encryption.

“Cryptographers have spent several decades thinking about how you might be able to break the security of RSA encryption in various scenarios,” Dr. Heninger said. “But we didn’t have any assurances that the approaches cryptographers were taking were optimal, the best that you could do.”

That’s where the math comes in. Much like the notion of trying to solve which two factors make up a massive number, RSA encryption requires two encoded “keys” composed of many digits. One is public, the other private. Dr. Heninger uses the example of a bank to explain. A bank publishes its public key which users employ to send messages about private, personal financial information. The bank then uses its private key to decrypt those messages.

“Nobody else can decrypt the message unless they have the bank’s private key,” Dr. Heninger said. “And they can’t compute the private key from the public key. That’s the foundation of security on the internet.”

To this point, the Penn collaboration has meshed well, figuring out how to skirt the barriers of translating back and forth between what are essentially two different languages of math and computer science.

“Cryptographers are incredibly clever,” Dr. Chinburg said. “They find methodology that theoreticians never would have dreamed of. On the other hand, arithmetic geometers have invented some methods new to the cryptography community. I’m very excited that our group has the opportunity to combine the two subjects.”

It could result in a safer, more secure internet.

UCD: Breaking Ground on Trolley Portal Gardens

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Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney, University City District (UCD) President Matthew Bergheiser, UCD Board chair Craig Carnaroli and other dignitaries broke ground last week on Trolley Portal Gardens, the future site of a public space and restaurant at the 40th Street Trolley Portal. Construction on the $4.5 million project to transform the 40th Street Trolley Portal will begin next month. A public-private partnership between UCD, SEPTA, the City of Philadelphia and neighborhood stakeholders will transform the space from a blighted and unwelcoming place into a vibrant and social space featuring beautiful landscaping, movable seating and a new restaurant called Trolley Car Station.

SEPTA Travel Center @ Penn: in the Penn Bookstore on Campus

  • December 13, 2016
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Navigating the Tri-State Region via public transit just became easier for anyone who chooses to work, study or visit campus, thanks to a unique collaboration between SEPTA and Penn Transit Services. Officials from both organizations gathered at the Penn Bookstore on Wednesday, December 7, for a ribbon-cutting ceremony that celebrated the grand opening of the new SEPTA Travel Center @Penn.

Centrally located on the first floor of the Penn Bookstore at 36th and Walnut Streets, the travel center is the first of its kind. The center will be staffed by SEPTA customer service agents Mondays through Fridays from 11 a.m. until 6 p.m. In addition to providing information about SEPTA, the center will offer assistance with all forms of travel in and around Penn’s campus and the City, including Penn Transit Services, Loop Around University City (LUCY®), New Jersey Transit, Amtrak, Indego Bike Share and car sharing.

This collaboration with SEPTA will support members of the Penn community as well as area residents and visitors to University City to better understand and utilize the array of transit resources available to them.

 

ISC Service Rates for FY’18

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Information Systems and Computing (ISC) plans to hold most rate-based services steady for FY’18. This includes the Central Service Fee and ISC’s wired, wireless, voice, email and collaboration services.  All ISC service rates for FY’18 are available at www.isc.upenn.edu/rates-service-list

For help determining the services you need, please visit the ISC Client Care website at www.isc.upenn.edu/help or call (215) 898-1000.

—Tom Murphy, Vice President for Information Technology  and University Chief Information Officer

Data Rates (Monthly)    

     FY’18

IP Address Fee (CSF)    

$1.56

Port Fees 
10Base-T   

$4.75

100Base-T  

$4.75

1000Base-T    

$4.75

10000Base-T 10GbE*

$80.00

Activation fees apply to all port activations. 
See: www.isc.upenn.edu/pennnet-ethernet-ports-rates 

* Limited availability. Ongoing monthly connectivity charges include a bandwidth surcharge to support increased costs associated with the campus backbone and external Internet. Additional  installation fees may include fiber, additional optical components and contractor charges. Please contact ISC Client Care at help@isc.upenn.edu to discuss associated costs for specific network environments.

Wireless Networks

FY’18

Access Point Installation     

$800*

Access Point Support & Port Fee

$30.50


*This is an estimate for budgeting purposes. Monthly support costs include equipment capitalization, hardware and software maintenance, and staff support.
                           
Telephony 
Rates for PennNet and Traditional Phone Services will remain the same for FY’18.
For a complete description of telephony services and rates, see: www.isc.upenn.edu/pennnet-phone-rates 

Email Services
Rates for PennO365 email will remain the same for FY ’18. 
For more information, please visit: www.isc.upenn.edu/penno365-rates

Penn Video Network (PVN) Rates (Monthly)  

  FY’18

PVN Outlet      

$21.50

 

PVN operates the campus cable television network and the Penn Video Productions group, which offers full Coursera production, as well as a range of other professional video services for the Penn community. PVN can also broadcast course-related content to academic buildings and student residences. For a complete description of Penn Video Productions rates and available services, see: www.isc.upenn.edu/phone-tv-video

 

Penn Dental: Bone Symposium at Penn Wharton China Center in Beijing

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Penn Dental Medicine recently presented a research symposium at Penn Wharton China Center (PWCC) in Beijing, drawing researchers and practitioners from throughout China. A Symposium on Bone Biology and Its Impact on Periodontics and Implantology, the November 12 program was the first to be presented by Penn Dental Medicine through support from Penn’s China Research and Engagement Fund (CREF), awarded to the School last year. 

Penn Dental Medicine was among the inaugural recipients of the CREF awards, which were announced by Penn President Amy Gutmann in September 2015 in conjunction with a week-long series of events marking the first 100 days of the PWCC. The CREF program is designed to stimulate and support activity in China and engagement with the Penn Wharton China Center. 

Penn Dental Medicine’s CREF grant, Advancing Research and Clinical Practice, includes three research symposia – the recently presented bone symposium, one that will address biofilm and a third on stem cells. The CREF grant will also fund a conference on the delivery of dental care to China, where a variety of approaches to delivering dental care are evolving. 

Syngcuk Kim, associate dean for global affairs, is the principal investigator of the grant with co-principal investigators Songtao Shi, chair and professor, department of anatomy and cell biology; Dana Graves, interim chair and professor of periodontics and vice dean for scholarship and research; and Hyun Koo, professor of orthodontics and divisions of pediatric dentistry & community oral health. 

“The program was very well received by participants and our China partners,” said Dr. Graves, who led the development of the bone symposium. “I believe it can lead to more collaborative research in this area going forward.” 

The program included lectures by Dr. Graves on the mechanisms of diabetes-impaired fracture healing and one by Penn Dental Medicine’s Shuying Yang, associate professor, department of anatomy & cell biology, on bone formation, along with eight researchers from partnering schools throughout China addressing a variety of related topics. The participating lecturers represented Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University School of Stomatology, Capital Medical University School of Stomatology, Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South, Wuhan University School of Stomatology, and Sichuan University West China School of Stomatology. A poster session featuring research of postdoctoral/junior faculty and students from schools throughout China was also part of the program followed by an awards dinner. 

The next CREF-award symposium to be presented at PWCC in 2017 is being organized by Dr. Koo on the topic of biofilm.

 

New Staff Members at Penn’s Office of Government and Community Affairs

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Penn’s Office of Government and Community Affairs (OGCA) welcomes Leigh Whitaker as director of city relations. Prior to joining Penn, she served as the vice president of communications for SugarHouse Casino, where she was responsible for developing and implementing a comprehensive community and city relations plan. She is a graduate of Clark Atlanta University and Temple University’s Beasley School of Law, and is a licensed attorney in Pennsylvania. In her role, Ms. Whitaker will serve as Penn’s liaison with the City of Philadelphia and City Council and will advise the University community on matters relating to local government.
 

Geoff Heath joins OGCA from the Delaware House of Representatives, where he served as special projects and data manager for the Democratic Caucus. He holds a bachelor’s degree in political science and a master’s degree in public administration from the University of Delaware. As associate director, he will foster depth across the strategic activities led by the Federal, Commonwealth, City, and Community Relations staff.
 

Norman Scott recently joined OGCA as administrative coordinator, managing daily operations and supporting marketing and community engagement activities. He is a 2016 graduate of Temple University, where he studied media business and entrepreneurship. 

Contact OGCA with any comments or questions about Penn’s government and community relations activities: ogca@pobox.upenn.edu or (215) 898-1388.

Oliver Garden: Chair of Penn Vet’s Department of Clinical Studies-Philadelphia

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The University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine (Penn Vet) has announced the appointment of Oliver Garden as chair of the department of clinical studies-Philadelphia.

As chair, Dr. Garden will lead the department in providing the best clinical care to companion animal patients at Ryan Hospital; developing new approaches to improving companion animal health through innovative and impactful research; and educating and training the next generation of veterinary students.

Prior to joining Penn Vet, Dr. Garden served as professor of comparative medicine and immunology and head of the Oncology Special Interest Group at the Royal Veterinary College, University of London. He also served as a clinician in the Queen Mother Hospital for Animals, the largest companion animal referral center in Europe, where his clinical interests were gastrointestinal and immune-mediated diseases. Dr. Garden’s research focuses on regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells in dogs and mice, in both the healthy organism and in the context of autoimmune disease and cancer.

“Dr. Garden’s internationally recognized expertise and research, his enthusiasm for interdisciplinary collaboration and his desire for increased public understanding of the importance of veterinary medicine make him a perfect fit for Penn Vet,” said Joan C. Hendricks, the Gilbert S. Kahn Dean of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. “We look forward to watching the department of clinical studies-Philadelphia thrive under his leadership.”

Dr. Garden graduated from the Royal Veterinary College after earning his bachelor of science degree from King’s College London. Following a rotating internship in small animal medicine and surgery, Dr. Garden completed a Wellcome Trust Clinical PhD program in small animal gastroenterology and immunology at the Royal Veterinary College, followed by a Wellcome Trust Research Training Fellowship at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine. He then held a residency in small animal internal medicine at Cornell University. Dr. Garden also completed a Wellcome Trust Advanced Fellowship within the department of immunology at Imperial College London, where he later served as a visiting professor. He is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine and the European College of Veterinary Internal Medicine-Companion Animals.

Penn Vet’s department of clinical studies-Philadelphia plays a vital role in the School’s three-part mission of research, education and service. The department is home to hospital staff and 45 faculty members who combine clinical practice with ongoing research, positioning veterinary medicine as a leading influence in both animal and human health.

Governance

Faculty Senate Executive Committee Agenda

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The following agenda is published in accordance with the Faculty Senate Rules. Any member of the standing faculty may attend SEC meetings and observe. Questions may be directed to Patrick Walsh, executive assistant to the Senate Office, either by telephone at (215) 898-6943 or by email at senate@pobox.upenn.edu

Faculty Senate Executive Committee Agenda
Wednesday, January 18, 2017
3-5 p.m.
Glandt Forum, 3rd Floor, Singh Center for Nanotechnology 

1. Approval of the Minutes of December 7, 2016 (1 minute)
2. Chair’s Report (5 minutes)
3. Past-Chair’s Report on Academic Planning & Budget, Capital Council, and Campaign for Community (5 minutes)
            C4C applications are being accepted now at
            https://provost.upenn.edu/initiatives/campaign/grants
4. Update from the Office of the President (45 minutes)
Discussion with President Amy Gutmann
5. Discussion on the Role and Representation of the “Non-Standing Faculty” at Penn   (45 minutes)
6. New Business (1 minute)

Faculty Senate Executive Committee Actions

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The following is published in accordance with the Faculty Senate Rules. Among other purposes, the publication of SEC actions is intended to stimulate discussion among the constituencies and their representatives. Please communicate your comments to Patrick Walsh, executive assistant to the Senate Office, either by telephone at (215) 898-6943 or by email at senate@pobox.upenn.edu

Faculty Senate Executive Committee Actions
Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Chair’s Report. Faculty Senate Chair Laura Perna informed SEC members of the January meeting location and indicated that President Gutmann would be the meeting’s guest. She also indicated that the focus group on Non-Standing Faculty, which was postponed from November, will be held at that meeting.|

Past-Chair’s Report. Faculty Senate Past Chair Reed Pyeritz reported that the Academic Planning and Budget Committee and Capital Council met and that the Campaign for Community Steering Committee met on November 29. The Campaign for Community continues to review applications on a rolling basis.

Approval of Membership Roster for the Senate Ad Hoc Committee to Review the Academic Calendar. SEC members voted to approve the roster.

Selection of Chair for the 2017 Senate Nominating Committee. SEC members unanimously elected Susan Marguiles as chair from among that committee’s final roster.

Discussion and Vote: Selection of six members to serve on the Ad Hoc Consultative Committee for the Selection of a Provost. Professor Perna reminded the committee that the Faculty Handbook allows the Senate to select six persons from among its membership to serve on this committee. The Handbook indicates that, to the extent possible, the selected members should be diverse with respect to background characteristics and school representation. She noted that all SEC members and Senate Committee Chairs were invited to nominate themselves. A ballot was distributed in person and by email; the voting period remained open for 24 hours, until Thursday, December 8, at 5 p.m., at which point the final results were tallied and the names of the six nominees receiving the most votes were forwarded to the president.

Follow-up from November SEC Meeting. Professor Perna led a discussion of potential actions the Faculty Senate might take in the coming months to build on the statement passed at the November 16 SEC meeting (Almanac November 22) and the March of Solidarity. She reported that the Senate Committee on Faculty Development, Diversity, and Equity and the University Council Committee on Diversity and Equity have been discussing matters of campus and classroom climate. On December 2, the Faculty Senate and the Office of the Vice Provost for Faculty co-sponsored a two-hour Diversity Forum during which participants discussed school-level practices for increasing faculty diversity and inclusion. SEC members shared information related to diversity and inclusion in their own schools and discussed possibilities for unconscious bias training and additional resources to improve teaching and advising, as well as other issues.

Panel Discussion: Current Mental Health Trends. Vice President for Public Safety Maureen Rush convened a panel of administrative leaders at Penn who are responsible for handling matters related to student mental health issues and sexual violence, assault and stalking. Panelists were William Alexander, director of Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS); Sharon Smith, director of Student Intervention Services; Deborah Harley, sexual violence investigative officer; Jessica Mertz, director of Student Sexual Violence Prevention and Education; and Patricia Brennan, director of Special Services in the Division of Public Safety.  The panelists briefed SEC on their roles at Penn and addressed SEC members’ questions.

Honors

Fatih Birol: Carnot Prize

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Fatih Birol, executive director of the International Energy Agency, was recently awarded the Carnot Prize for his “distinguished contributions to energy policy.” The Carnot Prize is awarded by the Kleinman Center for Energy Policy at Penn’s School of Design.

“We honor Fatih Birol for guiding the complex and politically fraught process of global collaboration on energy policy,” Penn President Amy Gutmann said. “Dr. Birol is steadily advancing inclusivity and equity by expanding the IEA’s role beyond primarily ‘first world’ interests to encompass a much broader global community.”

“I am extremely honored by this distinction, which celebrates a forefather of the energy revolution, a mathematician and scientist Nicolas Sadi Carnot,” Dr. Birol said. “Carnot’s work has helped improve our understanding of energy efficiency, a topic to which we are very much attached at the IEA. It’s a special pleasure to be in the company of Penn students who will be the future leaders of our industry.”

Dr. Birol will put his $25,000 in prize money toward IEA’s collaborative efforts with Clean Energy Ministerial, specifically their Women in Clean Energy Initiative.

In addition, a new graduate fellowship at the International Energy Agency was named in honor of Dr. Birol.

Penn-Made President Dennis DePerro: St. Bonaventure University

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Dennis DePerro, Gr’06,has been named the 21st president of St. Bonaventure University in Allegheny, New York. Dr. DePerro, now the dean of the Purcell School of Professional Studies at Le Moyne College in Syracuse, will take office on June 1, 2017.

Dr. DePerro, who holds a doctorate in higher education management from University of Pennsylvania, was unanimously chosen by trustees in November after an eight-month search process.

Dr. DePerro served as vice president for enrollment management at Le Moyne for 18 years before becoming the inaugural dean of the School of Graduate and Professional Studies in 2013. Previously, he was dean of admission and financial aid at Marietta College in Ohio from 1990-1995 and worked in admissions and alumni relations at Canisius College from 1982-1990.

Sarah Millar: FOCUS Award for the Advancement of Women in Medicine

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Sarah E. Millar, the Albert M. Kligman Endowed Professor and vice chair for basic science research in the department of dermatology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has received the 2016 FOCUS Award for the Advancement of Women in Medicine.

The award, presented by Penn Medicine’s FOCUS on Health & Leadership for Women program, recognizes a faculty member whose outstanding efforts and achievements have promoted the career success, leadership and overall quality of life for Penn women in academic medicine.

Dr. Millar is an internationally recognized researcher whose principal focus is the development and renewal of skin, hair follicles, teeth and mammary glands. She has collaborative interests in the areas of lung and heart development.

“Dr. Millar is a highly respected researcher and scholar, outstanding supervisor and exemplary mentor with an ardent commitment to the development and advancement of younger scientists, students, and post-doctoral fellows,” said Stephanie Abbuhl, executive director of FOCUS. “Promoting women’s academic and professional excellence has been a priority throughout her distinguished career. Her mentoring has had a profound effect on numerous Penn-based young researchers, as well as nationally and internationally.  And she regularly plays an active role in many initiatives here at Penn, bringing clear vision and exceptional levels of energy and dedication to every project.”

Dr. Millar was selected for her strong supervising and mentoring record and for serving as chair of the School of Medicine’s Child Care Task Force during 2013-14, when she led the planning of a child care center at Penn Medicine, which is slated to open in 2018. Dr. Millar also has worked extensively with fellow Penn Medicine senior women faculty members and the school’s Office of Inclusion and Diversity to identify and rectify space and salary constraints hindering women’s progress in the basic sciences. In April 2016 she co-organized a symposium on gender bias in scientific publishing, which featured presentations and discussions with editors of the journals Cell, Science and JAMA, examining ways to enhance gender equity in publishing in top-tier journals.

Paul Saint-Amour: Modernist Studies Association Book Prize

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Paul Saint-Amour, professor of English in the School of Arts & Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania, has won the Modernist Studies Association Book Prize for 2016 for his most recent book, Tense Future: Modernism, Total War, Encyclopedic Form (Oxford University Press, 2015). The prize is awarded annually to the author of a book published in the previous year that has made a significant contribution to modernist studies.
Dr. Saint-Amour works on Victorian and modernist literature and has special interests in the novel, law, trauma and visual culture studies.

In Tense Future, Dr. Saint-Amour examines the role of anticipation in trauma, as opposed to the nearly exclusive focus in trauma studies on post-traumatic syndromes. He argues that 20th-century war technologies and practices, such as the aerial bombing of cities, introduced civilians to a coercive and traumatizing expectation or “pre-traumatic stress.”

ShaVon Savage: Henry C. Lea Elementary School Principal

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ShaVon Savage, GSE’02, GrL’07, was named principal of the Henry C. Lea Elementary School, a partnership school with Penn GSE. She began her tenure as principal on July 18, 2016.

Ms. Savage taught for a year in the School District of Philadelphia before enrolling in Penn GSE’s Teacher Education Program. She then spent a year at High Tech High and another at the Penn Alexander School.

The Lea School serves about 540 students in grades K-8; has about 100 students with individualized educational plans (IEPs); and is roughly 16% English-language learners. Penn began collaborating with the Lea School in the 1960s.

Ten Penn Faculty: AAAS Fellows

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Ten professors from the University of Pennsylvania have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). They are among a class of 391 members honored for their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. Election as a Fellow of AAAS, the world’s largest scientific society, is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers.

The new AAAS Fellows from Penn are:

Rajeev Alur, ZismanFamily Professor in the School of Engineering and Applied Science’s department of computer and information science, for fundamental contributions to logics, models and analysis techniques for real-time and hybrid systems. 

Peter F. Davies, a professor of pathology & laboratory medicine in the Perelman School of Medicine’s department of pathology and laboratory medicine, for seminal discoveries in the role of mechanical forces in atherogenesis and for distinguished contributions in vascular biology and vascular pathology in general. 

Ruben C. Gur, professor of psychology in the Perelman School of Medicine’s department of psychiatry, for groundbreaking contributions using neuroimaging as an experimental probe to document sex differences, aging effects and abnormalities in brain function in a variety of disorders.

Jon Martin Lindstrom, Trustee Professor in Neuroscience in the Perelman School of Medicine’s department of neuroscience, for distinguished contributions to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors field, particularly for discovering that receptor autoimmune response causes myasthenia gravis and for elucidating pathology and possible therapies.

Michael S. Marks, professor of physiology and pathology and laboratory medicine in the Perelman School of Medicine’s department of physiology and at CHOP, for dissection of mechanisms by which melanosomes and other lysosome-related organelles form within cells and their implications for general endolysosomal maturation. 

Mary C. Mullins, a professor of cell & developmental biology in the Perelman School of Medicine’s department of cell & developmental biology,  for distinguished contributions in cell and developmental biology, particularly for pioneering zebrafish as a model genetic system to study signaling and polarity in vertebrate development.

Phillip Scott, a professor of microbiology & immunology in the School of Veterinary Medicine’s department of pathobiology and vice dean for research and academic resources,  for distinguished contributions to the field of microbiology, particularly for immunologic research that provides a foundation for developing new vaccines and immunotherapies for cutaneous leishmaniasis. 

Amita Sehgal, John Herr Musser Professor in the department of neuroscience in the Perelman School of Medicine, for distinguished contributions to neuroscience and physiology, particularly in elucidating molecular mechanisms and cellular circuits underlying circadian rhythms and sleep.

Donald A. Tomalia, an adjunct professor in Penn Arts & Sciences’ department of chemistry, for pioneering contributions to nanotechnology and nanomedicine, particularly the discovery of new dendritic macromolecular architectures including dendrimers, poly(oxazolines) and a nanoperiodic concept for unifying nanoscience.

Arjun Yodh, James M. Skinner Professor of Science in Penn Arts & Sciences’ department of physics and astronomy and director of the Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter, for seminal contributions to the field of experimental soft condensed matter physics, especially in optical measurements and applications in biophysics. 

Each new Fellow will be presented an official certificate and a gold and blue rosette pin on February 18, 2017 at the 2017 AAAS Annual Meeting in Boston.

Susan Mandel: President-Elect, Endocrine Society

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Susan J. Mandel, director of clinical endocrinology and diabetes for the University of Pennsylvania Health System, and a professor in the division of diabetes, endocrinology and metabolism in Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine, has been elected president-elect of the Endocrine Society. Dr. Mandel will officially begin her term in April 2017 and will take office as president in 2018.

“Having worked with Susan for nearly 20 years here at Penn, I have seen firsthand her leadership, commitment to education and clinical and research expertise,” said Mitchell A. Lazar, chief of the division of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism. “Susan has delivered first-class care to her patients year after year, and is well-established as an international expert in the diagnosis, evaluation and treatment of thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer. She has also been an innovative leader of Penn’s training program for fellows in endocrinology and metabolism.”

Dr. Mandel is director of the fellowship program in the division of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism where she oversees and educates upwards of eight clinical and research fellows each year. She is associate chief of the division of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism and is director and creator of the Thyroid Nodule Clinic at Penn Medicine.

Fels Collaborative Grants to Eight Penn Professors

  • December 13, 2016
  • vol 63 issue 17
  • Honors
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The Fels Policy Research Initiative in the School of Arts & Sciences (SAS) at the University of Pennsylvania has announced eight collaborative grant recipients. Each will be awarded as much as $15,000 in support of three new working groups and five conferences, designed to further interdisciplinary partnerships. 

The three working groups will research social issues reflecting Penn’s commitment to local, national and global engagement:

• The Immigration and Immigrant Rights: Led by Michael Jones-Correa, professor of political science, and Amada Armenta, assistant professor of sociology, both in SAS, the group will identify Penn scholars focused on immigration and share their research with policy decision-makers.

• Researching and Informing Policies Relating to LGBTQ Youth and Families: Amy Hillier, associate professor in Penn’s School of Design with a secondary appointment in the School of Social Policy & Practice, will partner with Penn’s Alice Paul Center for Research on Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies, bringing together researchers and practitioners to develop policies pertaining to LGBTQ youth and their families, as well as strengthen connections between Penn, the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the Philadelphia Department of Public Health.

• River Research Seminar: Bethany Wiggin, associate professor of German in SAS will connect faculty and students across disciplines from Penn, Drexel and Temple, in conjunction with community partners, to explore the Schuylkill River and Philadelphia’s urban waters.

“This latest round of grants demonstrates that faculty not only want to work together across disciplines to research public policy topics but are eager to find ways to ensure their research reaches policymakers,” Mark Alan Hughes, faculty director for the Fels Policy Research Initiative, said.

The five conferences that were awarded grants will address a variety of issues related to economic policy, infrastructure, housing in the future, diversity and more:

• Dirk Krueger, professor of economics in SAS, will pool academics and researchers from across Penn and policy institutions to present and discuss macroeconomic research and fiscal policies at  the Philadelphia Workshop on Macroeconomics and Economic Policy, at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.

• John MacDonald, professor of criminology and sociology, and the Fels Institute of Government will host the Rebuilding America Summit, addressing the problem of an aging and underfunded infrastructure by assembling Penn faculty, government budget directors and chief financial officers.

• Penn Design’s John Landis and Vincent Reina will join economics and sociology faculty to blend academics, think-tank researchers, federal policy and program managers, local implementers and community-based advocates to identify and develop new priorities for the next generation of housing policy in the United States.

• Dawn Teele, assistant professor of political science in SAS, will amass Penn scholars, faculty from other institutions, campaign training program leaders and politicians to better understand what incentives encourage women to seek political office in Nudging Women to Run.

• Daniel Hopkins, associate professor of political science in SAS, will lead a conference to advance efforts toward integrating the perspectives of social and behavioral science into the City of Philadelphia’s work.

AT PENN

Events

WXPN Meeting: December 13

  • December 13, 2016
  • vol 63 issue 17
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A WXPN Policy Board Meeting will be held today, December 13, at noon at WXPN, 3025 Walnut Street. It is open to the public. For more information, call (215) 898-0628.

 

Toys for Tots Collection: December 15

  • December 13, 2016
  • vol 63 issue 17
  • Events
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The Association of Business Administrators (ABA) at Penn is again participating in the Toys for Tots program. ABA will collect unwrapped new toys on ThursdayDecember 15, from noon to 1:30 p.m. at the Sheraton University City Hotel, 3549 Chestnut Street. The US Marines will be on site to collect the toys.

 

Human Resources: Upcoming January Programs

  • December 13, 2016
  • vol 63 issue 17
  • Events
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Professional & Personal Development Programs

Improve your skills and get ahead in your career by taking advantage of the many development opportunities provided by Human Resources. You can register for programs by visitingknowledgelink.upenn.edu or contacting Learning and Education at (215) 898-3400. 

Learning with Lynda: Building Accountability into Your Culture; 1/10; 12:30-1:30 p.m.; free. In this course, leadership consultant and executive coach Mike Figliuolo reveals how to create a culture of accountability by developing accountability at the individual level, team level and brand level. Along the way, he shows how to set employee expectations, create incentives and align the practice of accountability with the values of your organization.

Learning with Lynda utilizes the University’s enterprise-wide license of Lynda.com to provide a blended learning solution to the Penn campus.  Prior to attending the in-class session, it is strongly recommended that you take the online Lynda module. During the classroom session we apply the concepts from the online module.

Learning with Lynda: Giving Your Elevator Pitch; 1/11; 12:30-1:30 p.m.; free. It’s important to make a good impression in just the first few minutes you spend with potential mentors, clients  or even friends. In this short course, author and business coach Todd Dewett explains how to tell others what you do and make a memorable impression in a short period of time with a personal “elevator pitch.” Maximize your connection in a minimal amount of time, and start making valuable additions to your network from the get-go.

Learning with Lynda utilizes the University’s enterprise-wide license of Lynda.com to provide a blended learning solution to the Penn campus.  Prior to attending the in-class session, it is strongly recommended that you take the online Lynda module. During the classroom session we apply the concepts from the online module.

TED Talk Tuesday: Drew Dudley’s “Everyday Leadership”; 1/24; 12:30-1:30 p.m.; free. Society commonly perceives leaders as individuals who make grand, world-changing decisions. Thus, the vast majority of people are reluctant or shy to identify themselves as leaders. But true leadership is about making the life of another person better, and most people do that every day–perhaps without knowing it. Employing a personal anecdote from his past, leadership trainer Drew Dudley outlines the importance of celebrating everyday leaders.

Project Management;  1/25; 9 a.m.-noon; $75. Managing projects can feel daunting. It requires a focus on defining the initiative, planning for work, managing the initiative and monitoring results. Join us for a seminar to learn about tools and techniques that can help you manage your projects. Learn how to identify the key activities in the project life cycle and how to construct a project timeline. Understand the role of the “triple constraint” in project management and apply it in determining project scope. Learn how to keep projects on track by managing project risks and effectively using a communication plan. Capture valuable project lessons and use them to define and improve project management practices within your organization.

Brown Bag: Getting Work Done; 1/25; 12:30-1:30 p.m.; free. How often is your well-planned day disturbed by interruptions? No matter what skills and strengths you already possess, the skill of acquiring more time cannot be one of them. Get more work done by learning how to develop an effective workflow system, eliminate time and energy wasters. By the end of the course, you will have a toolbox full of strategies to cope with your daily distractions.

Learning with Lynda: Leading Productive One-on-One Meetings; 1/31; 12:30-1:30 p.m.; free.  Regular one-on-one meetings provide managers with an opportunity to head off problems and efficiently answer the many small,  quick questions that arise during the workweek. In this course, Dave Crenshaw shows you how to establish a one-on-one meeting schedule and agenda, assign and review actions items and assess the results of the meeting and follow up on promises. The course also explains how to effectively listen to employees’ needs and when to offer training and development.

Learning with Lynda utilizes the University’s enterprise-wide license of Lynda.com to provide a blended learning solution to the Penn campus.  Prior to attending the in-class session, it is strongly recommended that you take the online Lynda module. During the classroom session we apply the concepts from the online module.   

Quality of Worklife Workshops

Dealing with the demands of work and your personal life can be challenging. These free workshops, sponsored by Human Resources and led by experts from Penn’s Employee Assistance Program and Quality of Worklife Department, offer information and support for your personal and professional life challenges. For complete details and to register, visit www.hr.upenn.edu/myhr/registration or contact Human Resources at (215) 573-2471 or qowl@hr.upenn.edu

Mindfulness Monday: From Mind Full to Mindful; 1/23; 12:30-1:30 p.m.; free.
Mindfulness is “paying attention, on purpose, in the present moment, non-judgmentally,” said Jon Kabat-Zinn. Mindfulness practice develops awareness of your present thoughts and feelings to help you manage different situations. In this once-a-month experiential workshop, you’ll see how mindfulness can help you become more engaged and effective both at home and in the workplace. No prior meditation experience necessary.

Managing Relationships; 1/26; 11:30 a.m. -12:30 p.m.; free. Managing relationships isn’t always easy, especially when conflicts arise. With the right strategies, you can effectively manage even the most difficult relationships. This workshop can show you how. You’ll learn to find “win-win” solutions to personal and professional conflicts with assertiveness, collaboration, handling internal reactions and other skills.

Healthy Living Workshops

Get the tools you need to live well year-round. From expert nutrition and weight loss advice to exercise and disease prevention strategies, we can help you kick-start your body and embrace a healthy lifestyle. These free workshops are sponsored by Human Resources. For complete details and to register, visit www.hr.upenn.edu/myhr/registration Or contact Human Resources at (215) 573-2471 or qowl@hr.upenn.edu

Guided Meditation: Take a Breath and Relax; 1/17; noon-1 p.m.; free. Practice mindful breathing that focuses your attention on the present moment with kindness, compassion and awareness. Self-massage and gentle mindful movements that promote relaxation and reduce stress may also be included in the workshop. No experience necessary.

Division of Human Resources

 

Update: December AT PENN

  • December 13, 2016
  • vol 63 issue 17
  • Events
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Special Event

15 WPPSA Annual Holiday Party; noon-2 p.m.; rm. 111, Hill Pavilion; donations are accepted for the Ronald McDonald Holiday Wish List: http://www.upenn.edu/wpsa/ ; RSVP: mdotson@sas.upenn.edu (WPPSA).

___________

AT PENN Deadlines:

The December AT PENN calendar is here. The deadline for the February AT PENN calendar is January 17.

Info. is on the sponsoring department’s website; sponsors are in parentheses. For locations, call (215) 898-5000 or see www.facilities.upenn.edu

 

Crimes

Weekly Crime Reports

  • December 13, 2016
  • vol 63 issue 17
  • Crimes
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The University of Pennsylvania Police Department Community Crime Report

About the Crime Report: Below are all Crimes Against Persons, Property and Crimes Against Society from the campus report for November 28-December 4, 2016View prior weeks' reports. —Ed.

This summary is prepared by the Division of Public Safety and includes all criminal incidents reported and made known to the University Police Department between the dates of November 28-December 4, 2016. The University Police actively patrol from Market Street to Baltimore Avenue and from the Schuylkill River to 43rd Street in conjunction with the Philadelphia Police. In this effort to provide you with a thorough and accurate report on public safety concerns, we hope that your increased awareness will lessen the opportunity for crime. For any concerns or suggestions regarding this report, please call the Division of Public Safety at (215) 898-4482.

11/30/1610:52 PM4039 Chestnut StTheftFedEx Package taken
12/01/163:15 AM4111 Pine StTheftPackage taken from steps
12/01/1610:24 AM2929 Walnut StTheftVarious property taken
12/01/1612:35 PM200 S 40th StOther OffenseMale cited for public urination
12/01/163:15 PM4109 Pine StTheftPackage taken from porch
12/01/163:58 PM210 S 34th StFraudUnauthorized transactions on credit cards
12/02/161:30 AM3700 Market StVandalismCab window and credit card system damaged
12/02/167:58 AM451 University AveHarassmentComplainant harassed by ex-employee
12/02/168:37 AM240 S 40th StDisorderly ConductMale screaming at staff and causing disturbance/Arrest
12/02/1611:13 AM2929 Walnut StTheftCheck removed from desk
12/03/164:33 PM3701 Walnut StTheftProperty removed from locker
12/03/1610:15 PM220 S 40th StOther OffenseOffender punched complainant/Arrest
12/04/166:15 AM51 N 39th StVandalismWindow broken to 3 vehicles
12/04/165:16 PM4212 Walnut StTheftSecured bike taken

18th District Report

Below are the Crimes Against Persons from the 18th District: 7 incidents with 2 arrests (4 robberies, 2 assaults and 1 aggravated assault) were reported between November 28-December 4, 2016 by the 18th District covering the Schuylkill River to 49th Street & Market Street to Woodland Avenue.

11/28/1612:14 AM42nd & Baltimore AveAggravated Assault/Arrest
11/28/166:50 PM4000 Market StRobbery
11/29/168:54 PM48th & Cedar AveRobbery
12/01/1610:00 AM4700 Baltimore AveRobbery
12/03/1611:03 PM220 S 40th StAssault/Arrest
12/04/166:34 PM42nd & Chester AveAssault
12/04/169:05 PM4500 Regent StRobbery

Bulletins

Almanac Schedule

  • December 13, 2016
  • vol 63 issue 17
  • Bulletins
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This is the last issue for this semester. After the upcoming Winter Break, Almanac will resume publishing weekly starting with the January 10 issue. Submissions for that issue are due no later than Tuesday, January 3, space permitting.

Breaking news will be posted in the Almanac Between Issues section of the Almanac website and sent out to Express Almanac subscribers. To subscribe, see www.upenn.edu/almanac/express.html 

Bookstore Customer Survey

  • December 13, 2016
  • vol 63 issue 17
  • Bulletins
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The Penn Bookstore and the Division of Business Services invite Penn faculty and staff to participate in the 2016 Bookstore Customer Survey. Provide feedback on the bookstore’s services and offerings, and enter to win one of three $100 Penn Bookstore gift certificates. This feedback is important to them. To respond visit: http://bit.ly/2gED5bb

 

DPS Walk Back Program

  • December 13, 2016
  • vol 63 issue 17
  • Bulletins
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The Division of Public Safety, working with the Undergraduate Assembly and the Graduate and Professional Student Assembly, is offering a free Public Safety Walk-Back Program. During Reading Days and Final Exams, from Tuesday, December 13, through Thursday, December 22, an Allied Universal Security Officer will be at the Button in front of Van Pelt Library on Woodland Walk from 10 p.m. to 3 a.m. to offer walking escorts.

Additionally, every half-hour an officer will meet with students at the security desk in the main entrance of the Van Pelt-Dietrich Library to offer walking escorts.

The Division of Public Safety is providing this service in addition to its normal Walking Escort Program. Uniformed Allied Universal Security Officers provide escorts to campus locations, available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, between 30th to 43rd Streets and Market Street to Baltimore Avenue. Escorts will accompany you from one location to another, to your parked vehicle, to a Penn Transit Stop or to an on-campus SEPTA transit stop. The officer will wait with you at your transit stop until you are safely on the vehicle.

Escorts are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. To request a Walking Escort, call (215) 898-9255 (898-WALK).

Escorts are also available in an expanded area, from 10 a.m. until 3 a.m., between 43rd & 50th and Spring Garden Street & Woodland Avenue via the University’s partnership with the University District Ambassador Program.

 

Buzzed Driving is Drunk Driving

  • December 13, 2016
  • vol 63 issue 17
  • Bulletins
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The holidays are known for being merry and bright, but they’re also known for being the deadliest season when it comes to drunk driving. Every holiday season, lives are lost due to drunk drivers.

You have to choose your role before drinking begins: will you drink or will you drive? Remember, even if you only have a little bit to drink and think you’re “okay to drive,” you could still be over the legal limit, because Buzzed Driving is Drunk Driving. 

Remember to always designate a sober driver.

—Division of Public Safety

 

Human Resources: What You Need to Know About IRS Form 1095-C

  • December 13, 2016
  • vol 63 issue 17
  • Bulletins
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This coming tax season, most Penn faculty and staff members will receive an IRS document called Form 1095-C. Required by the Affordable Care Act, Form 1095-C includes information about the health insurance coverage offered to you by Penn.

You will receive this form if you:

•   worked as a full-time benefits-eligible staff or faculty member in 2016, even if you have not enrolled in a Penn plan; 

•   are a part-time benefits eligible staff or faculty member enrolled in a Penn benefit plan at any point in 2016,

•   or you worked at Penn an average of 30 or more hours per week in 2016 and were offered ACA benefits coverage.

The 1095-C form will be mailed to you on or before January 31, 2017. Your form will also be available online on or before January 31, 2017 in the My Pay section of the secure U@Penn portal at www.upenn.edu/u@penn Select “My 1095-C form” to access yours. 

If you have questions about your form, call Equifax at 1-(855)-823-3728.

If you receive a Form 1095-C from Penn, be sure to keep it for your records. You may need the information on the form when you file your tax return or have your tax return prepared.

If your family members—adult children under age 26, for example—are covered under a Penn healthcare plan, they may also need a copy of your Form 1095-C for their tax returns.

To make sure your Form 1095-C is mailed to the correct address, please review and update your home address on the U@Penn Portal at www.upenn.edu/u@penn 

After you log in to the U@Penn Portal with your PennKey username and password, select “My Profile” under the “My Personal Data” tab and proceed to update your home address as needed.

Your Form 1095-C will contain details about your eligibility for Penn health plans. The form will also provide information for each of your family members enrolled under your Penn benefit plan. The IRS will use the information from 1095-C to determine who will need to make a Shared Responsibility Payment for failing to have healthcare coverage as required by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. 

If you worked for other employers during 2016, or had other sources of coverage in 2016, you may receive similar forms from them as well.

For detailed information and updates about Form 1095-C, visit www.irs.gov/form1095c and the IRS Affordable Care Act Tax Provisions for Individuals and Families webpages.
 

—Division of Human Resources

Human Resources: Human Resources Special Winter Vacation Hours

  • December 13, 2016
  • vol 63 issue 17
  • Bulletins
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Resource

Contact Information

Services

Holiday Schedule

Penn Benefits Center

1-888-PENNBEN (1-888-736-6236)

www.hr.upenn.edu/myhr/benefits

Penn’s health and welfare benefits

December 26: closed
January 2: closed

Retirement Call Center

1-877-PENN-RET (1-877-736-6738)

www.hr.upenn.edu/myhr/benefits/retirement

Penn’s retirement plans

December 23: open 8 a.m.–4 p.m. 
December 24 and 26: closed
January 2: closed

Staff and Labor Relations

1-215-898-6093

www.hr.upenn.edu/myhr/payandperform/appraisal/performance-management-programs

www.hr.upenn.edu/myhr/workplaceissues

Emergency employee relations issues

December 26–January 2: closed (voicemails checked daily)

Employee Assistance Program

1-888-321-4433

www.hr.upenn.edu/myhr/worklife/healthy/eap

Personal and professional life issues

Available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

Care.com Backup Care

1-800-688-4697

www.hr.upenn.edu/backupcare

Temporary in-home dependent child and adult care services to help you manage your professional responsibilities

Care available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

Please register and schedule care in advance.

Call Center: 
December 24 and 25: closed
January 1: closed

 
 

 

 

Call for Penn Summer Camps

  • December 13, 2016
  • vol 63 issue 17
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Almanac will run the 2017 list of Summer Camps and Programs at Penn in the January 31 issue. To list a camp or program, send the dates, location and other details to almanac@upenn.edu 

Deadline for submissions is January 17.

 

Special Checks Program

  • December 13, 2016
  • vol 63 issue 17
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Under the special checks program, DPS officers check the exterior of registered properties for signs of criminal activity or security breaches at peak travel times during Thanksgiving, Winter and Spring Breaks.

Winter Break Special Checks will begin at 5 p.m. on Monday, December 19 and continue through 3 p.m. on Sunday, January 8.

The program is available at no charge to residents in the Penn patrol zone, bounded by 30th Street to 43rd Street and from Baltimore Avenue to Market Street.

Students, faculty and staff who live in the patrol zone are encouraged to register their residence using the link below. Be sure to list your contact information, other occupants, landlord if applicable, vacancy dates, scheduled repairs and someone other than a landlord with access or a key to the property. 

Penn Police will periodically check the exterior of registered properties, for signs of criminal activity or security breaches during the break. Special checks cannot be provided for interior areas of apartment complexes. 

To register for a special check, visit: https://www.publicsafety.upenn.edu/contact/propertycheck/

 

Human Resources: Pay Timing Reminder for December and January

  • December 13, 2016
  • vol 63 issue 17
  • Bulletins
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Moving forward, the University will follow the normal payment schedule throughout the year, including the weeks before Special Winter Vacation. Penn faculty and staff will now receive regular, steady payments based on actual time worked, week-to-week or month-to-month, regardless of the season. 

The last pay in December is Friday, December 30, 2016.

 

Winter 2016-2017 Compensation 
Payment Schedule

 

Weekly Paid Staff

Monthly Paid Faculty and Staff

December

Weekly payments throughout the month on Fridays ending December 30, 2016

Payment date: December 30, 2016

January

Weekly payments throughout the month, beginning January 6, 2017

Payment date: January 31, 2017
The schedule change does not affect pay for this month.

 
 

For details about the schedule, please see the Pay Timing in November and December announcement in the August 23, 2016 issue of Almanac at http://www.upenn.edu/almanac/volumes/v63/n02/pay-timing.html